Azamara

11-night Wine & Culture Voyage

Azamara Quest

Your boutique hotel at sea, the Azamara Quest® is a mid-sized ship with a deck plan that’s intimate but never crowded, and offers everything modern voyagers are looking for—plus some unexpected extras.

Explore the ship
Itinerary highlights
The city of Lisbon, Portugal Lisbon Portugal
Nighttime view of Bilbao, Spain Bilbao Spain
Bordeaux France
Ship highlights
Photo of the Aqualina Aqualina
Photo of the Enrichment Program & Classes Enrichment Program & Classes
Photo of the Mosaic Cafe and Mosaic @ Night Mosaic Cafe and Mosaic @ Night
from
£2,135
per person
from
£194
per night
Free cancellation up to 30 days before you sail through 30 April 2022
13 Jun 2021
£2,969 £2,135
13 Jun 2021
£3,519 £2,436
13 Jun 2021
£4,189 £2,940
13 Jun 2021
£5,979 £4,445
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The itinerary

Set on seven hills on the banks of the River Tagus, Lisbon has been the capital of Portugal since the 13th century. It is a city famous for its majestic architecture, old wooden trams, Moorish features and more than twenty centuries of history. Following disastrous earthquakes in the 18th century, Lisbon was rebuilt by the Marques de Pombal who created an elegant city with wide boulevards and a great riverfront and square, Praça do Comércio. Today there are distinct modern and ancient sections, combining great shopping with culture and sightseeing in the Old Town, built on the city's terraced hillsides. The distance between the ship and your tour vehicle may vary. This distance is not included in the excursion grades.

The city of Lisbon, Portugal

Ever since the Romans constructed a fort here and began using it as a trading post, Oporto has been a prosperous commercial centre. In the 15th and 16th centuries the city benefited from the wealth generated by Portugal’s maritime discoveries, and later, the establishment of a lucrative wine trade with Britain compensated for the loss of the spice trade. Today, Portugal’s second-largest city is a thriving, cosmopolitan place and is famous for its production of the fortified, sweet 'port' wine. Its historic centre is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and the city was also awarded the status of European Capital of Culture in 2001. A large sandbar prevents ships from sailing into Oporto itself, so for over a century they have used nearby Leixões instead, a man-made seaport constructed nine miles from the city. Leixões is one of Portugal's major sea ports and is also home to one of the country's oldest football clubs, winners of the Taça de Portugal cup in 1961.

Day 3At Sea

Time in Bilbao (Bilbo, in Euskera) may be recorded as BG or AG (Before Guggenheim or After Guggenheim). Never has a single monument of art and architecture so radically changed a city. Frank Gehry's stunning museum, Norman Foster's sleek subway system, the Santiago Calatrava glass footbridge and airport, the leafy César Pelli Abandoibarra park and commercial complex next to the Guggenheim, and the Philippe Starck AlhóndigaBilbao cultural center have contributed to an unprecedented cultural revolution in what was once the industry capital of the Basque Country.Greater Bilbao contains almost 1 million inhabitants, nearly half the total population of the Basque Country. Founded in 1300 by Vizcayan noble Diego López de Haro, Bilbao became an industrial center in the mid-19th century, largely because of the abundance of minerals in the surrounding hills. An affluent industrial class grew up here, as did the working class in suburbs that line the Margen Izquierda (Left Bank) of the Nervión estuary.Bilbao's new attractions get more press, but the city's old treasures still quietly line the banks of the rust-color Nervión River. The Casco Viejo (Old Quarter)—also known as Siete Calles (Seven Streets)—is a charming jumble of shops, bars, and restaurants on the river's Right Bank, near the Puente del Arenal bridge. This elegant proto-Bilbao nucleus was carefully restored after devastating floods in 1983. Throughout the Casco Viejo are ancient mansions emblazoned with family coats of arms, wooden doors, and fine ironwork balconies. The most interesting square is the 64-arch Plaza Nueva, where an outdoor market is pitched every Sunday morning.Walking the banks of the Nervión is a satisfying jaunt. After all, this was how—while out on a morning jog—Guggenheim director Thomas Krens first discovered the perfect spot for his project, nearly opposite the right bank's Deusto University. From the Palacio de Euskalduna upstream to the colossal Mercado de la Ribera, parks and green zones line the river. César Pelli's Abandoibarra project fills in the half mile between the Guggenheim and the Euskalduna bridge with a series of parks, the Deusto University library, the Meliá Bilbao Hotel, and a major shopping center.On the left bank, the wide, late-19th-century boulevards of the Ensanche neighborhood, such as Gran Vía (the main shopping artery) and Alameda de Mazarredo, are the city's more formal face. Bilbao's cultural institutions include, along with the Guggenheim, a major museum of fine arts (the Museo de Bellas Artes) and an opera society (Asociación Bilbaína de Amigos de la Ópera, or ABAO) with 7,000 members from Spain and southern France. In addition, epicureans have long ranked Bilbao's culinary offerings among the best in Spain. Don't miss a chance to ride the trolley line, the Euskotram, for a trip along the river from Atxuri Station to Basurto's San Mamés soccer stadium, reverently dubbed "la Catedral del Fútbol" (the Cathedral of Football).

Nighttime view of Bilbao, Spain

Bordeaux as a whole, rather than any particular points within it, is what you'll want to visit in order to understand why Victor Hugo described it as Versailles plus Antwerp, and why the painter Francisco de Goya, when exiled from his native Spain, chose it as his last home (he died here in 1828). The capital of southwest France and the region's largest city, Bordeaux remains synonymous with the wine trade: wine shippers have long maintained their headquarters along the banks of the Garonne, while buyers from around the world arrive for the huge biennial Vinexpo show (held in odd-number years).Bordeaux is, admittedly, a less exuberant city than many others in France, but lively and stylish elements are making a dent in its conservative veneer. The cleaned-up riverfront is said by some, after a bottle or two, to exude an elegance reminiscent of St. Petersburg, and that aura of 18th-century élan also permeates the historic downtown sector—“le vieux Bordeaux"—where fine shops invite exploration. To the south of the city center are old docklands undergoing renewal—one train station has now been transformed into a big multiplex movie theater—but the area is still a bit shady. To get a feel for the historic port of Bordeaux, take the 90-minute boat trip that leaves Quai Louis-XVIII every weekday afternoon, or the regular passenger ferry that plies the Garonne between Quai Richelieu and the Pont d'Aquitaine in summer. A nice time to stroll around the city center is the first Sunday of the month, when it's pedestrian-only and vehicles are banned.

Bordeaux as a whole, rather than any particular points within it, is what you'll want to visit in order to understand why Victor Hugo described it as Versailles plus Antwerp, and why the painter Francisco de Goya, when exiled from his native Spain, chose it as his last home (he died here in 1828). The capital of southwest France and the region's largest city, Bordeaux remains synonymous with the wine trade: wine shippers have long maintained their headquarters along the banks of the Garonne, while buyers from around the world arrive for the huge biennial Vinexpo show (held in odd-number years).Bordeaux is, admittedly, a less exuberant city than many others in France, but lively and stylish elements are making a dent in its conservative veneer. The cleaned-up riverfront is said by some, after a bottle or two, to exude an elegance reminiscent of St. Petersburg, and that aura of 18th-century élan also permeates the historic downtown sector—“le vieux Bordeaux"—where fine shops invite exploration. To the south of the city center are old docklands undergoing renewal—one train station has now been transformed into a big multiplex movie theater—but the area is still a bit shady. To get a feel for the historic port of Bordeaux, take the 90-minute boat trip that leaves Quai Louis-XVIII every weekday afternoon, or the regular passenger ferry that plies the Garonne between Quai Richelieu and the Pont d'Aquitaine in summer. A nice time to stroll around the city center is the first Sunday of the month, when it's pedestrian-only and vehicles are banned.

Bordeaux as a whole, rather than any particular points within it, is what you'll want to visit in order to understand why Victor Hugo described it as Versailles plus Antwerp, and why the painter Francisco de Goya, when exiled from his native Spain, chose it as his last home (he died here in 1828). The capital of southwest France and the region's largest city, Bordeaux remains synonymous with the wine trade: wine shippers have long maintained their headquarters along the banks of the Garonne, while buyers from around the world arrive for the huge biennial Vinexpo show (held in odd-number years).Bordeaux is, admittedly, a less exuberant city than many others in France, but lively and stylish elements are making a dent in its conservative veneer. The cleaned-up riverfront is said by some, after a bottle or two, to exude an elegance reminiscent of St. Petersburg, and that aura of 18th-century élan also permeates the historic downtown sector—“le vieux Bordeaux"—where fine shops invite exploration. To the south of the city center are old docklands undergoing renewal—one train station has now been transformed into a big multiplex movie theater—but the area is still a bit shady. To get a feel for the historic port of Bordeaux, take the 90-minute boat trip that leaves Quai Louis-XVIII every weekday afternoon, or the regular passenger ferry that plies the Garonne between Quai Richelieu and the Pont d'Aquitaine in summer. A nice time to stroll around the city center is the first Sunday of the month, when it's pedestrian-only and vehicles are banned.

The gateway to the Atlantic Ocean and the country’s seventh largest city, Nantes is located on the north bank of the Loire River. Although officially no longer the capital of Brittany since Nantes was included in the Pays de Loire administrative region, many of the city’s inhabitants regard themselves still an integral part of Brittany. During medieval times, much of the city’s prosperity resulted from colonial expeditions and the slave trade. Today Nantes is the most important commercial and industrial centre in west-central France, and appears as a particularly well-managed city with fine museums and carefully tended parks and gardens. One of the museums is dedicated to Jules Verne, born here in 1828. The Loire, foundation of Nantes’ riches, has dwindled from the city centre. As recently as the 1930s the river crossed the city in seven separate channels. However, they were filled in after World War II but, fortunately, left the area’s 18th-century mansions intact. They once were the trademark of rich merchants who made their fortunes from the slave trade. French influence was brought to Nantes by the Loire and its trade from the end of the 18th century when the city became known as "Little Paris." The Place Royale and the Place Graslin were first laid out during that time. One of the most impressive landmarks is the Chateau des Ducs, most of which is preserved in its original form built by the last two rulers of independent Brittany, Francois II, and his daughter Duchess Anne, born here in 1477.

Cathedral of Saint-Pierre-et-Saint-Paul in Nantes, France

The gateway to the Atlantic Ocean and the country’s seventh largest city, Nantes is located on the north bank of the Loire River. Although officially no longer the capital of Brittany since Nantes was included in the Pays de Loire administrative region, many of the city’s inhabitants regard themselves still an integral part of Brittany. During medieval times, much of the city’s prosperity resulted from colonial expeditions and the slave trade. Today Nantes is the most important commercial and industrial centre in west-central France, and appears as a particularly well-managed city with fine museums and carefully tended parks and gardens. One of the museums is dedicated to Jules Verne, born here in 1828. The Loire, foundation of Nantes’ riches, has dwindled from the city centre. As recently as the 1930s the river crossed the city in seven separate channels. However, they were filled in after World War II but, fortunately, left the area’s 18th-century mansions intact. They once were the trademark of rich merchants who made their fortunes from the slave trade. French influence was brought to Nantes by the Loire and its trade from the end of the 18th century when the city became known as "Little Paris." The Place Royale and the Place Graslin were first laid out during that time. One of the most impressive landmarks is the Chateau des Ducs, most of which is preserved in its original form built by the last two rulers of independent Brittany, Francois II, and his daughter Duchess Anne, born here in 1477.

Cathedral of Saint-Pierre-et-Saint-Paul in Nantes, France

Day 10At Sea

Cobblestone streets, blooming floral displays, and tiny churches welcome you to this wonderfully pretty harbour. The town of St Peter Port is as pretty as they come, with glowing flower displays painting practically every street corner and window-ledge with colour. As the capital, and main port of Guernsey, St Peter Port puts all of the island’s gorgeous beaches, wonderful history and inspiring stories at your fingertips. Feel the gut punch of the midday gun firing at Castle Cornet, which stands guard over one of the world's prettiest ports. This 800-year-old, Medieval castle offers staggering views of the harbour from its imposing, craggy island location, and you can look out across to the looming shorelines of the other Channel Islands from its weathered battlements. With four well-tended gardens, and five museums offering a rich overview of Guernsey's history, you’ll want to leave a few hours aside to explore the many treasures that lie within the castle’s walls.

Bluebell woods on the island of Guernsey

Southampton is the UK's largest and busiest cruise port, catering for over 1.5 million passengers every year. Located just a two hour drive out of London, or an 80-minute train journey, Southampton has a rich history on display across the city's museums and cultural venues, as well as leading shopping shopping outlets, many restaurants and bars, and award-winning public parks. Walking around the city centre, you'll see many remnants of the ancient city walls, don't miss the Bargate Monument – a Grade I-listed medieval gatehouse. Further afield, you can take in the sights of nearby cities of Portsmouth and Winchester, or visit the world-renowned heritage site of Stonehenge.

Boats in Southampton Harbour

The ship Azamara Quest

Your boutique hotel at sea, the Azamara Quest® is a mid-sized ship with a deck plan that’s intimate but never crowded, and offers everything modern voyagers are looking for—plus some unexpected extras.

Capacity
690
Total crew
408
Length
592m

Food and drink

At Azamara Club Cruises® we take you to remarkable destinations. We also give you more time to fall in love with them. It’s what we call Destination Immersion® experiences, and it's what happens when you can stay longer and experience more local life and culture in every port.

But Destination Immersion® experiences don't just happen on shore. They happen onboard, too. What does that mean for dining with Azamara Club Cruises®? We incorporate the flavors of a destination into our food and drink menus. What does that mean for you? An exclusive, local, and personalized culinary experience. It’s time to get a real taste for travel.

NEW VEGAN MENU

Plant-based diet? Now there’s a menu just for you – available at Discoveries, Prime C, and Aqualina.

Aqualina

At Aqualina, you’ll find some of Italy’s most authentic dishes. Pastas made from scratch, traditional and authentic recipes, and scrumptious vegetarian dishes... Read more

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Fusion

Prime C

Steaks cooked to perfection. Crab cakes with remoulade. Lobster bisque. Lamb, game hens and seafood. And last but certainly not least, our... Read more

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Surf Turf

The Wine Cellar

You’ll be hard-pressed to find such a collection of limited production, small label and rare vintage wines anywhere on the high seas!... Read more

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Wine

Discoveries Restaurant

Discover the world through dishes and flavors from the places we visit. Whether it’s our Destination Immersion dinner buffet or the Destination... Read more

Complimentary
Classic

Windows Café

The best way to see where you are in the world is not by looking at your itinerary. It’s by checking out... Read more

Complimentary
Buffet

The Patio and Swirl & Top

Casual “pool grill” by day. Then, fine tablecloths and flickering candles will set the mood for a sit-down al fresco dining experience... Read more

Complimentary
Casual

Mosaic Cafe

Casual “pool grill” by day. Then, fine tablecloths and flickering candles will set the mood for a sit-down al fresco dining experience... Read more

Complimentary
Cafe

The Living Room

Mid-afternoon is teatime in the Looking Glass Lounge. Refresh yourself with elegant pastries, handmade tea sandwiches, and tea or champagne while enjoying... Read more

Cover
Cafe

Room Service

The best time for room service? Whenever you say it is, 24-hours a day. Order from the full breakfast menu between 6.30am... Read more

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Room

Entertainment

A cozy nook to sip coffee. An intimate space to raise a glass and celebrate. A lively setting to catch the latest shows and international entertainment. Watch the world go by, drink in hand from any of Azamara’s bars, lounges, and gathering spaces. From port to port, our onboard venues are the perfect place to unwind after a day of onshore discovery, to connect over drinks both before and after dinner, or take in a one of a kind show. And, with Azamara’s Beverage Packages you can indulge in a superb collection of fine wines, premium spirits, and more—without reaching for your wallet.

Discoveries Lounge

Located just outside Azamara’s main restaurant, this congenial bar is a favorite gathering place for pre- and post-dinner conversation and drinks. Bar... Read more

The Living Room

The idea of the Living Room is just that. To “live in” and to enjoy time with friends and fellow guests! Much... Read more

Cabaret Lounge

Enjoy live performances of professional full-stage musical revues, classical soloists, bands and other entertainment in a cabaret nightclub with a full bar... Read more

Casino Luxe

Test your skill, or prove to your shipmates that Lady Luck stands by your side. The Casino will keep you entertained with... Read more

Mosaic Cafe and Mosaic @ Night

Our onboard coffee corner may very well become your favorite nook on the ship. And with brand new furniture on the Journey,... Read more

Boutiques

You’ll find a tasteful collection of merchandise, beautiful jewelry and watches—and the promise of discovery and delight—in our signature shops. Window shop... Read more

Poolside Parties

Don’t think of missing Azamara’s famous poolside buffet and party, held at least once on every cruise (weather permitting). Colourful décor and... Read more

Spirits

And for all you sports fans, the Spirits bar adjacent to the Casino features a flat-screen TV and full bar, making it... Read more

The Den

Azamara Pursuit and Quest’s newest lounge exemplifies our dedication to Destination Immersion® experiences. The Den inspires you with tools to travel to... Read more

The Drawing Room

This library is one of the quiet jewels of Azamara, a peaceful and beautifully appointed space for reading or relaxing after dinner.... Read more

Health and fitness

LOOK BETTER. FEEL BETTER. GO HOME INVIGORATED.

If you’ve ever wished for a week or two to reboot, this is it. Treat yourself to health, beauty, and restorative treatments in our all new Sanctum Spa. With a focus on wellness and vigour, our relaxing spa offers you the chance to focus on you—something you don’t always have time to do at home. Enjoy an oceanfront massage, a quick manicure before hitting the town to explore, teeth whitening, barber services, or even a healing acupuncture treatment.

But beyond the Sanctum Spa, Azamara is also pleased to offer a full range of complimentary onboard fitness and nutrition classes, including one-on-one personal training for an additional cost. An Azamara voyage is the perfect opportunity to focus on your health—so let us treat you to some rest, relaxation, and rejuvenation.

The Spa

Staffed by professional aestheticians and therapists, the Azamara Spa is an oasis of tranquility. Choose from an extensive menu of services including:

  • The... Read more

The Salon

Our full service salon offers a menu of professional services for men and women, including:

  • Hair styling and care including cuts, colouring, highlights... Read more

Fitness Centre & Personal Training

The secret to maintaining vitality? Exercise more. Many Azamara guests are eager to do just that, and we make it easy with... Read more

Acupuncture

A voyage is a great time to experience the benefits of this ancient Chinese system of healing. Acupuncture strengthens the immune system,... Read more

Kids and teens

Please note: There are no child or teen specific facilities available onboard Azamara Quest.

Enrichment

When you have a passion for authentic travel, you let it take you where you long to go. For Azamara, that means coming aboard, setting sail out on the open sea, and then exploring well beyond it. Azamara has always taken travelers where no one else goes—unrivaled destinations, smaller ports, longer stays—now we venture further ashore. Beyond scratching the surface, so you can discover more history, more arts, more wilderness, more local cuisine, and more local culture than ever before.

Land Programs

Our expanded Land Programs portfolio pairs us up with some of the most reputable independent travel experts in the world, so you... Read more

Enrichment Program & Classes

Your quest to learn continues with destination lecturers offering their expertise throughout each voyage with Azamara®. These leading destination experts will participate... Read more

Useful info

Special Dietary Requirements

With advance notice, we can accommodate most special dietary needs. Please submit your request in writing to our Access Department no later... Read more

Smoking Policy

Each of Azamaras ships have a designated smoking area, located on the starboard forward section of the pool deck. This area is... Read more

Age Restrictions

The minimum drinking age for all alcoholic beverages on all Azamara ships is 21. On European and South American sailings where the... Read more

Disabilities and Special Needs

We welcome guests with disabilities and special needs and work hard to assist them throughout their vacation. To receive appropriate assistance, be... Read more

Service Animals

Cruising with your Companion

Your service dog is welcome onboard, and we make every effort to ensure your comfort and theirs. Please note... Read more

Medical Facilities

Each Azamara vessel is equipped with a medical facility. At least one licensed physician and one nurse are generally in attendance on... Read more

Health & Safety

Fire Risks
Even though fire risk is minimal, fire suppression systems are installed throughout all areas of the vessel. The primary fire suppression... Read more

Dress Code

Guests are encouraged to follow a 'resort casual' dress code, following good taste and common sense. Bare feet, tank tops, baseball caps,... Read more

Room Service

The best time for room service? Whenever you say it is, 24-hours a day.

Order from the full breakfast menu between 6:30 AM... Read more

Internet / WiFi

Prepaid Internet packages can be purchased in incremental packages, based on the number of minutes you plan to use. Internet access on... Read more
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* Passengers should be aged under 18 at the time of embarkation to qualify as a child.
Prices shown are per person based on two people sharing (unless otherwise specfied) in GBP and subject to availability. Certain restrictions can apply. Prices are updated on a daily basis and may vary when continuing through the booking process.