Celebrity Cruises

14-night Vietnam & Thailand

Celebrity Solstice

Celebrity Solstice® is one of our most decorated ships. So it's no wonder that it's full of "firsts." The first Lawn Club at sea.

Explore the ship
Itinerary highlights
Singapore Singapore
Ho Chi Minh City Vietnam
Ko Samui, Thailand Ko Samui Thailand
Ship highlights
Photo of the Tuscan Grille Tuscan Grille
Photo of the Beyond the Podium Beyond the Podium
Photo of the Let's Dance Let's Dance
from
£1,749
per person
from
£125
per night
Free cancellation up to 30 days before you sail through 30 April 2022
21 Nov 2021
£1,779 £1,749
21 Nov 2021
£2,069
21 Nov 2021
£2,339 £2,309
21 Nov 2021
£4,769 £4,669
Book from £1,749 Email me this cruise

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Cancel your cruise for free up to 48 hours before your sail date and get a future cruise credit valid for at least 12 months. Applies to any booking made before 31st January 2021.

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The itinerary

The main island of Singapore is shaped like a flattened diamond, 42 km (26 miles) east to west and 23 km (14 miles) north to south. Near the northern peak is the causeway leading to West Malaysia—Kuala Lumpur is less than four hours away by car. It is at the southern foot where you will find most of the city-state’s action, with its gleaming office towers, working docks, and futuristic "supertrees," which are solar-powered and serve as vertical gardens. Offshore are Sentosa and over 60 smaller islands, most uninhabited, that serve as bases for oil refining or as playgrounds and beach escapes from the city. To the east is Changi International Airport, connected to the city by metro, bus, and a tree-lined parkway. Of the island's total land area, more than half is built up, with the balance made up of parkland, farmland, plantations, swamp areas, and rain forest. Well-paved roads connect all parts of the island, and Singapore city has an excellent, and constantly expanding, public transportation system. The heart of Singapore's history and its modern wealth are in and around the Central Business District. The area includes the skyscrapers in the Central Business District, the 19th-century Raffles Hotel, the convention centers of Marina Square, on up to the top of Ft. Canning. Although most of old Singapore has been knocked down to make way for the modern city, most colonial landmarks have been preserved in the CBD, including early-19th-century buildings designed by the Irish architect George Coleman.

Day 2At sea

Day 3At sea

Day 5At sea

Romantically referred to by the French as the Pearl of the Orient, Ho Chi Minh City today is a super-charged city of sensory overload. Motorbikes zoom day and night along the wide boulevards, through the narrow back alleys and past vendors pushing handcarts hawking goods of all descriptions. Still called Saigon by most residents, this is Vietnam's largest city and the engine driving the country's current economic resurgence, but despite its frenetic pace, it's a friendlier place than Hanoi and locals will tell you the food—simple, tasty, and incorporating many fresh herbs—is infinitely better than in the capital.This is a city full of surprises. The madness of the city's traffic—witness the oddball things that are transported on the back of motorcycles—is countered by tranquil pagodas, peaceful parks, quirky coffee shops, and whole neighborhoods hidden down tiny alleyways, although some of these quiet spots can be difficult to track down. Life in Ho Chi Minh City is lived in public: on the back of motorcycles, on the sidewalks, and in the parks. Even when its residents are at home, they're still on display. With many living rooms opening onto the street, grandmothers napping, babies being rocked, and food being prepared, are all in full view of passersby.Icons of the past endure in the midst of the city’s headlong rush into capitalism. The Hotel Continental, immortalized in Graham Greene's The Quiet American, continues to stand on the corner of old Indochina's most famous thoroughfare, the rue Catinat, known to American G.I.s during the Vietnam War as Tu Do (Freedom) Street and renamed Dong Khoi (Uprising) Street by the Communists. The city still has its ornate opera house and its old French city hall, the Hôtel de Ville. The broad colonial boulevards leading to the Saigon River and the gracious stucco villas are other remnants of the French colonial presence. Grisly reminders of the more recent past can be seen at the city's war-related museums. Residents, however, prefer to look forward rather than back and are often perplexed by tourists' fascination with a war that ended 40 years ago.The Chinese influence on the country is still very much in evidence in the Cholon district, the city's Chinatown, but the modern office towers and international hotels that mark the skyline symbolize Vietnam's fixation on the future.

Day 8At sea

Koh Samui is the most popular tourist destination on the Western Gulf coast, which isn't surprising, considering the island's gorgeous beaches, perfect weather, and sparkling blue, almost turquoise, water. Koh Samui has seen rapid development since the 1990s, and you'll encounter hotels in all price ranges.Koh Samui is half the size of Phuket, so you could easily drive around it in a day. But Koh Samui is best appreciated by those who take a slower, more casual approach. Most people come for the sun and sea, so they head straight to their hotel and rarely venture beyond its beach. But it's worth exploring beyond your lodging. Every beach has its own character, and you might find the perfect one for you. One beach many visitors find to their liking is Chawaeng. On Koh Samui's east coast, this stretch of glistening white sand is divided into two main sections—Chawaeng Yai (yai means "big") and Chawaeng Noi (noi means "little"). You'll find the greatest variety of hotels, restaurants, and bars here. Despite the crowds, Chawaeng is no Pattaya or Patong—the mood is very laid-back. A rocky headland separates Chawaeng Lamai Beach, whose clear water and long stretch of sand were the first place on the island to attract developers. More budget accommodations are available here than in Chawaeng, and there are some happening nightclubs.On the west coast of Koh Samui, Na Thon is the island's primary port and the spot where ferries arrive from the mainland. It's home to the island's governmental offices, including the Tourism Authority of Thailand, and there are banks, foreign-exchange booths, travel agents, shops, restaurants, and cafés by the ferry pier. A few places rent rooms, but there's really no reason to stay here—nicer accommodations can be found a short songthaew ride away.To the north and east of Na Thon lie a few beaches worthy of exploration. Laem Yai, 5 km (3 miles) north, has great seafood. East of here, a small headland separates two low-key communities on the northern shore, Mae Nam and Bophut Beach. Mae Nam is also the departure point for boats bound for Koh Phangan and Koh Tao . Just south of the Samui's northeastern tip you'll find sandy Choengmon Beach, a good area for swimming that's not overdeveloped.

Ko Samui, Thailand

Bangkok, also known as the City of Angels and Venice of the East thrills with energy. There's such a vast array of sightseeing, shopping, and eating possibilities that you'll have little time to rest. When you do find a moment, pamper yourself with spa treatments, skyline-view bars, luxurious hotels, and excellent restaurants. The city is a mesmerizing blend of old and new, East and West, and dizzying contradictions. Temples and red-light districts, languid canals and permanent gridlock, streetside vendors and chic upscale eateries, all make their home together, all at the same time. Bangkok rarely fails to make an impression, and yes, you might need to go spend a few days on the beach to recover from it all. Although Bangkok is not known for jaw-dropping tourist attractions, it does have an endless supply of worthwhile pilgrimages. The Grand Palace, Wat Phra Kaew, and the Emerald Buddha are tops on every visitor's itinerary, and lesser-known temples, such as Wat Benjamabophit, the golden stupa of Wat Sakhet, and Wat Suthat, are all worthy of a stop. Besides temples, there are plenty of other interesting niches and touring possibilities to fit just about every interest. Take in a venom extraction and python feeding show at the Queen Saowapha Snake Farm, or go to the nearby Jim Thompson House to learn all about the famed Thai silk industry. If architecture is your forte, there is the Suan Pakkard Palace with its antique teak house collection, and the even more astounding Vimanmek Palace, which contains the world's largest golden teak building. Bangkok's Chinatown merits at least a day on every travel itinerary—be sure to check out the sprawling labyrinthine Flower and Thieves markets. Thai food is unrivaled for spice, taste, and variation. From multicourse meals to small street vendors, the one constant here is fresh and delicious at every level. You can have superlative roast duck or wonton noodles on a street corner for lunch and then be dining on world-class chef creations in the Oriental or Shangri-La hotels for supper. It doesn't have to be all spicy Thai either, as Bangkok is home to excellent French, Italian, and other world cuisines, and you need a few years just to make a dent in all the options that are available. The Old City is a major destination for travelers, as it's home to opulent temples like Wat Po and Wat Phra Kaew. Across the river is Thonburi, a mostly residential neighborhood, where you can find Wat Arun. At the northern tip of the Old City is Banglamphu, one of Bangkok's older residential neighborhoods. It's best known now for Khao San Road, a backpacker hangout, though the neighborhood has much more to offer, especially when it comes to street food. North of Banglamphu is Dusit, the royal district since the days of Rama V. East of the Old City is Chinatown, a labyrinth of streets with restaurants, shops, and warehouses. Farther down the Chao Phraya River is bustling Silom Road, one of the city's major commercial districts. Patpong, the city's most famous of several red-light districts, is also here. Bang Rak is home to some of the city's leading hotels: the Mandarin Oriental, the Peninsula, the Royal Orchid Sheraton, and the Shangri-La. To the north of Rama IV Road is Bangkok's largest green area, Lumphini Park. Continue north and you reach Sukhumvit Road, once a residential area. More recently, Thong Lor, farther east along Sukhumvit, has become the "in" neighborhood for those want to see and be seen. The Nana and Asok areas of Sukhumvit are now home to the even busier red-light entertainment districts (Nana and Soi Cowboy) than Patpong.

The Bangkok skyline at night

Bangkok, also known as the City of Angels and Venice of the East thrills with energy. There's such a vast array of sightseeing, shopping, and eating possibilities that you'll have little time to rest. When you do find a moment, pamper yourself with spa treatments, skyline-view bars, luxurious hotels, and excellent restaurants. The city is a mesmerizing blend of old and new, East and West, and dizzying contradictions. Temples and red-light districts, languid canals and permanent gridlock, streetside vendors and chic upscale eateries, all make their home together, all at the same time. Bangkok rarely fails to make an impression, and yes, you might need to go spend a few days on the beach to recover from it all. Although Bangkok is not known for jaw-dropping tourist attractions, it does have an endless supply of worthwhile pilgrimages. The Grand Palace, Wat Phra Kaew, and the Emerald Buddha are tops on every visitor's itinerary, and lesser-known temples, such as Wat Benjamabophit, the golden stupa of Wat Sakhet, and Wat Suthat, are all worthy of a stop. Besides temples, there are plenty of other interesting niches and touring possibilities to fit just about every interest. Take in a venom extraction and python feeding show at the Queen Saowapha Snake Farm, or go to the nearby Jim Thompson House to learn all about the famed Thai silk industry. If architecture is your forte, there is the Suan Pakkard Palace with its antique teak house collection, and the even more astounding Vimanmek Palace, which contains the world's largest golden teak building. Bangkok's Chinatown merits at least a day on every travel itinerary—be sure to check out the sprawling labyrinthine Flower and Thieves markets. Thai food is unrivaled for spice, taste, and variation. From multicourse meals to small street vendors, the one constant here is fresh and delicious at every level. You can have superlative roast duck or wonton noodles on a street corner for lunch and then be dining on world-class chef creations in the Oriental or Shangri-La hotels for supper. It doesn't have to be all spicy Thai either, as Bangkok is home to excellent French, Italian, and other world cuisines, and you need a few years just to make a dent in all the options that are available. The Old City is a major destination for travelers, as it's home to opulent temples like Wat Po and Wat Phra Kaew. Across the river is Thonburi, a mostly residential neighborhood, where you can find Wat Arun. At the northern tip of the Old City is Banglamphu, one of Bangkok's older residential neighborhoods. It's best known now for Khao San Road, a backpacker hangout, though the neighborhood has much more to offer, especially when it comes to street food. North of Banglamphu is Dusit, the royal district since the days of Rama V. East of the Old City is Chinatown, a labyrinth of streets with restaurants, shops, and warehouses. Farther down the Chao Phraya River is bustling Silom Road, one of the city's major commercial districts. Patpong, the city's most famous of several red-light districts, is also here. Bang Rak is home to some of the city's leading hotels: the Mandarin Oriental, the Peninsula, the Royal Orchid Sheraton, and the Shangri-La. To the north of Rama IV Road is Bangkok's largest green area, Lumphini Park. Continue north and you reach Sukhumvit Road, once a residential area. More recently, Thong Lor, farther east along Sukhumvit, has become the "in" neighborhood for those want to see and be seen. The Nana and Asok areas of Sukhumvit are now home to the even busier red-light entertainment districts (Nana and Soi Cowboy) than Patpong.

The Bangkok skyline at night

Day 12At sea

Day 13At sea

The main island of Singapore is shaped like a flattened diamond, 42 km (26 miles) east to west and 23 km (14 miles) north to south. Near the northern peak is the causeway leading to West Malaysia—Kuala Lumpur is less than four hours away by car. It is at the southern foot where you will find most of the city-state’s action, with its gleaming office towers, working docks, and futuristic "supertrees," which are solar-powered and serve as vertical gardens. Offshore are Sentosa and over 60 smaller islands, most uninhabited, that serve as bases for oil refining or as playgrounds and beach escapes from the city. To the east is Changi International Airport, connected to the city by metro, bus, and a tree-lined parkway. Of the island's total land area, more than half is built up, with the balance made up of parkland, farmland, plantations, swamp areas, and rain forest. Well-paved roads connect all parts of the island, and Singapore city has an excellent, and constantly expanding, public transportation system. The heart of Singapore's history and its modern wealth are in and around the Central Business District. The area includes the skyscrapers in the Central Business District, the 19th-century Raffles Hotel, the convention centers of Marina Square, on up to the top of Ft. Canning. Although most of old Singapore has been knocked down to make way for the modern city, most colonial landmarks have been preserved in the CBD, including early-19th-century buildings designed by the Irish architect George Coleman.

The main island of Singapore is shaped like a flattened diamond, 42 km (26 miles) east to west and 23 km (14 miles) north to south. Near the northern peak is the causeway leading to West Malaysia—Kuala Lumpur is less than four hours away by car. It is at the southern foot where you will find most of the city-state’s action, with its gleaming office towers, working docks, and futuristic "supertrees," which are solar-powered and serve as vertical gardens. Offshore are Sentosa and over 60 smaller islands, most uninhabited, that serve as bases for oil refining or as playgrounds and beach escapes from the city. To the east is Changi International Airport, connected to the city by metro, bus, and a tree-lined parkway. Of the island's total land area, more than half is built up, with the balance made up of parkland, farmland, plantations, swamp areas, and rain forest. Well-paved roads connect all parts of the island, and Singapore city has an excellent, and constantly expanding, public transportation system. The heart of Singapore's history and its modern wealth are in and around the Central Business District. The area includes the skyscrapers in the Central Business District, the 19th-century Raffles Hotel, the convention centers of Marina Square, on up to the top of Ft. Canning. Although most of old Singapore has been knocked down to make way for the modern city, most colonial landmarks have been preserved in the CBD, including early-19th-century buildings designed by the Irish architect George Coleman.

The ship Celebrity Solstice

Celebrity Solstice® is one of our most decorated ships. So it's no wonder that it's full of "firsts." The first Lawn Club at sea.

Capacity
2850
Cabins
1426
Total crew
1284
Length
1041m

Food and drink

Offering a variety of seating options. Passengers can chose from traditional, set table seating at 6pm or 8.30pm, or Celebrity Select - the choice to dine any time between 6.30pm – 9pm. Advanced bookings are available as is the option to show up when you like.

Tuscan Grille

An Italian ristorante and enoteca with a contemporary twist.

Rustic elegance with a contemporary, minimalistic edge. Guests dining in Tuscan Grille will enjoy... Read more

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Italian

Main Restaurant

A grand stage for fine dining.

This sophisticated restaurant with a wide range of globally-inspired dishes created by a Michelin-starred chef will provide... Read more

Complimentary
Classic

24-hour Room Service

Enjoy Celebrity’s delectable dining delivered right to your stateroom or suite, complimentary and at any time.

Tired from a day of exploring? Whether... Read more

Complimentary
Room

Murano

As timeless as it is modern, the sophisticated ambience of Murano is reflected in the impeccable service and accomplished contemporary take on... Read more

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French

Cafe al Bacio & Gelateria

Traditional European coffeehouse offering guests a variety of traditional gelatos and Italian ices, pastries and specialty coffees.

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Cafe

Blu

AquaClass® guests can enjoy Blu, their own exclusive restaurant for breakfast and dinner. The cuisine at Blu is simply an imaginative way of... Read more

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International

Oceanview Cafe

This café's décor and offerings reflect that of an international marketplace. With a menu influenced by multiple cultures, the cuisine takes diners... Read more
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Cafe

Spa Cafe + Juice Bar

Extend Your Spa Experience.

A creative take on healthy cuisine, featuring an eclectic blend of offerings that are both flavorful and good for... Read more

Complimentary
Cafe

Sushi on Five

Every sushi lovers dream

Sushi restaurants. Wildly popular from the day it appeared, Sushi on Five satisfies your craving for locally sourced, authentically... Read more

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Japanese

Le Petit Chef

A one-of-a-kind dining concept.

Experience the fusion of entertainment and cuisine. We’ve brought the table top to life in a fantastic fusion of... Read more

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Varies

Entertainment

A mixture of contemporary, classic and innovative forms of entertainment can be found onboard. Classic entertainment options include a two-deck library, art gallery, cinema, card room, quizzes and trivia contests. Pool volleyball, lawn games and video games are also on offer.

Passport Bar

Wind down with a cocktail and classical music.

Relaxing and inviting, its position right off the grand foyer means this may be the... Read more

Observation Lounge

The Sky Observation Lounge, with its floor to ceiling windows overlooking the front of the ship, provides guests with breathtaking views to... Read more

Cellar Masters

Cellar Masters, is Solstice's wine bar which allows guests to try a wide range of wines from a collection of both familiar... Read more

Celebrity Central

Celebrity Central, located on deck 4, is the ship's second entertainment venue offering guests a range of lively and diverse entertainment from... Read more

Theatre

The Main Theatre is the place to sit back and be entertained – the talented Celebrity Cruises entertainment team will dazzle you... Read more

Art Gallery

Refined culture at sea is what you will experience in Celebrity's inspiring and thought-provoking Art Gallery. Stop in on your way to... Read more

Fortunes Casino

Feeling lucky? Combining the ambience of Monte Carlo and the energy of Las Vegas, Fortunes Casino is a perfect spot to participate... Read more

Martini Bar & Crush

On the totally cool, ice-topped bar, the talented bartenders put on a high-energy show preparing an intriguing menu of classic and contemporary... Read more

Sunset Bar

Relaxing and inviting, its position right off the Grand Foyer means this may be the first, but not the last, place you... Read more

Ensemble Lounge

The Ensemble Lounge, with its "dressed for dinner" gathering, is the ideal place for a drink before or after dining featuring live... Read more

Quasar

Quasar, is Solstice's vibrant nightclub. During the day events such as Wii and X-Box game competitions take place.

Lawn Club Grill

A half acre of real grass on the top deck, where a casual country club ambience comes as standard. 

World Class Bar

Some drinks are worth waiting for…

Welcome to our “fine drinking” experience, where the ritual of making cocktails is just as exciting as... Read more

Library

With over 2,000 books on subjects ranging from classic to popular biographies, history to contemporary mysteries. A selection of 1,000 DVDs and... Read more

Health and fitness

Whether you want to clear your mind, fine-tune your body, reinvigorate your spirit – or all of the above – The Spa is an indulgent escape where you can do it all. The Spa introduced an array of innovative new firsts in beauty, fitness and wellness that make finding complete bliss on holiday easier than ever. 

The Spa

Begin your spa journey by selecting from more than 120 treatments for a spa experience unlike anything else at sea. Discover ground-breaking... Read more

Fitness Centre

In the fitness centre you can meet with a personal trainer, take a fitness class, try our resistance swimming pool or challenge... Read more

Persian Garden

Accompanied by the calming strains of new age music, enjoy the warmth of a relaxing steam or treat your skin to the... Read more

Solarium

Find true poolside serenity at the Solarium. Featuring a gorgeous pool, sparkling waterfalls, thickly padded lounge chairs, and an adults-only policy, tranquility... Read more

Sports

Practise skills on your own, play with old or new friends, or take part in a tournament with one of the Celebrity... Read more

Pool Area

The Pool Area comprises of two pools separated by a bridge, with the forward one being the deeper sports pool and the... Read more

Kids and teens

Celebrity Cruises offer many unique family-friendly activities, as well as more traditional children’s clubs. Designed for children of all ages and interests, each program is geared towards a specific age group and supervised by an experienced youth staff member.

XClub

Younger cruisers ages 12-17 can cut loose and kick back the way they want in our hip VIP area geared specifically for... Read more

Fun Factory

Designed exclusively for junior cruisers, Fun Factory is a place where magic happens. Children age 3-11 will thrive in this environment, which... Read more

ShipMates

ShipMates offers plenty of games to play and activities to take part in specifically for children age 3-5.

Largest Xbox Experience at Sea

Dedicated Xbox stations and mobile consoles. Solo, tournament and theme nights for kids, teens and adults. The latest releases, all free to... Read more

iTake

Video project just for teens. From story boarding to filming and editing, prizes are awarded for numerous film category winners at the... Read more

Enrichment

In association with Rosetta Stone and Apple, Celebrity offers an impressive range of educational activities and guest speakers during most of their sailings. Learn how to dance, brush up on your language skills, or take in a unique hot glass show - the first at sea.

Beyond the Podium

Speaker series, covering a range of topics exploring the culture, history and biology of some of the destinations visited during each cruise

Let's Dance

A series of salsa, jive, ballroom and modern dance classes.

Ocean's Ahead

Talks from the Ship’s Officers, giving an insight into the workings of the ship; from navigation to recycling and solar power.

Rosetta Stone Language Sessions

Learn the basics of how to order in the local language of the next port of call, brush up on existing language... Read more

Art Classes and Lectures

Held in the art studio, meet resident artists or attend interactive classes and demonstrations, covering topics from jewellery making to sketching and... Read more

Useful info

Disabled Facilities

You may bring and use wheelchairs, mobility scooters and other assistive devices onboard our ships. Due to safety regulations, Segways may not... Read more

Special Dietary Requirements

Celebrity Cruises makes every effort to accommodate guest’s dietary requirements wherever possible. Most dietary needs can be catered for such as:
Vegetarian, Gluten... Read more

Age Restrictions

Drinking:
The minimum drinking age for all alcoholic beverages on all Celebrity Cruises ships is 21 years of age.
However, on ships sailing from... Read more

Dress Code

A Celebrity cruise is a step into luxury, so it’s the perfect opportunity to dress up for dining every evening.
Whether enjoying... Read more

Dining Packages

Onboard Celebrity’s ships you can experience several unique speciality restaurants and enjoy great savings when you purchase one of their Speciality Dining... Read more

Drinks Packages

How do I book a beverage package?

The packages can be pre-reserved up to a minimum of four days before your sail... Read more

Smoking Policy

If you wish to smoke, please use one of the designated areas outdoors. Smoking is not permitted in any of the dining... Read more

WiFi Access

All Celebrity Millennium® and Celebrity Solstice® Class ships are fully wireless and also have an internet area. Celebrity Xpedition has dial up... Read more

Environment

Lighting

We’re replacing higher wattage halogen and incandescent light bulbs with longer lasting fluorescent and Light Emitting Diode (LED) lights throughout our fleet.... Read more

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* Passengers should be aged under 18 at the time of embarkation to qualify as a child.
Prices shown are per person based on two people sharing (unless otherwise specfied) in GBP and subject to availability. Certain restrictions can apply. Prices are updated on a daily basis and may vary when continuing through the booking process.