Cunard

59-night Sydney To Southampton

Queen Victoria

Queen Victoria will delight you with her special appeal, where elegance and unique features combine seamlessly with outstanding hospitality. You’ll discover an extraordinary way to see the world.

Explore the ship
Itinerary highlights
Sydney Australia
Brisbane Australia
Manila, Philippines Manila Philippines
Ship highlights
Photo of the Queen's Grill Queen's Grill
Photo of the Cunard Insights Cunard Insights
Photo of the Cunard ConneXions Cunard ConneXions
from
£7,569
per person
from
£128
per night
1 Mar 2022
£7,729 £7,569
1 Mar 2022
£8,269 £8,019
1 Mar 2022
£10,449 £10,189
1 Mar 2022
£21,579 £20,499
Book from £7,569 Email me this cruise

The itinerary

Sydney belongs to the exclusive club of cities that generate excitement. At the end of a marathon flight there's renewed vitality in the cabin as the plane circles the city, where thousands of yachts are suspended on the dark water and the sails of the Opera House glisten in the distance. Blessed with dazzling beaches and a sunny climate, Sydney is among the most beautiful cities on the planet.With 4.6 million people, Sydney is the biggest and most cosmopolitan city in Australia. A wave of immigration from the 1950s has seen the Anglo-Irish immigrants who made up the city's original population joined by Italians, Greeks, Turks, Lebanese, Chinese, Vietnamese, Thais, and Indonesians. This intermingling has created a cultural vibrancy and energy—and a culinary repertoire—that was missing only a generation ago.Sydneysiders embrace their harbor with a passion. Indented with numerous bays and beaches, Sydney Harbour is the presiding icon for the city, and urban Australia. Captain Arthur Phillip, commander of the 11-ship First Fleet, wrote in his diary when he first set eyes on the harbor on January 26, 1788: "We had the satisfaction of finding the finest harbor in the world."Although a visit to Sydney is an essential part of an Australian experience, the city is no more representative of Australia than Los Angeles is of the United States. Sydney has joined the ranks of the great cities whose characters are essentially international. What Sydney offers is style, sophistication, and great looks—an exhilarating prelude to the continent at its back door.

Sydney belongs to the exclusive club of cities that generate excitement. At the end of a marathon flight there's renewed vitality in the cabin as the plane circles the city, where thousands of yachts are suspended on the dark water and the sails of the Opera House glisten in the distance. Blessed with dazzling beaches and a sunny climate, Sydney is among the most beautiful cities on the planet.With 4.6 million people, Sydney is the biggest and most cosmopolitan city in Australia. A wave of immigration from the 1950s has seen the Anglo-Irish immigrants who made up the city's original population joined by Italians, Greeks, Turks, Lebanese, Chinese, Vietnamese, Thais, and Indonesians. This intermingling has created a cultural vibrancy and energy—and a culinary repertoire—that was missing only a generation ago.Sydneysiders embrace their harbor with a passion. Indented with numerous bays and beaches, Sydney Harbour is the presiding icon for the city, and urban Australia. Captain Arthur Phillip, commander of the 11-ship First Fleet, wrote in his diary when he first set eyes on the harbor on January 26, 1788: "We had the satisfaction of finding the finest harbor in the world."Although a visit to Sydney is an essential part of an Australian experience, the city is no more representative of Australia than Los Angeles is of the United States. Sydney has joined the ranks of the great cities whose characters are essentially international. What Sydney offers is style, sophistication, and great looks—an exhilarating prelude to the continent at its back door.

Day 3At Sea

Founded in 1824 on the banks of the wide, meandering Brisbane River, the former penal colony of Brisbane was for many years regarded as just a big country town. Many beautiful timber Queenslander homes, built in the 1800s, still dot the riverbanks and inner suburbs, and in spring the city's numerous parks erupt in a riot of colorful jacaranda, poinciana, and bougainvillea blossoms. Today the Queensland capital is one of Australia's most up-and-coming cities: glittering high-rises mark its polished business center, slick fashion boutiques and restaurants abound, and numerous outdoor attractions beckon. In summer, temperatures here are broilingly hot and days are often humid, a reminder that this city is part of a subtropical region. Wear SPF 30-plus sunscreen and a broad-brimmed hat outdoors, even on overcast days.Brisbane's inner suburbs, a 5- to 10-minute drive or 15- to 20-minute walk from the city center, have a mix of intriguing eateries and quiet accommodations. Fortitude Valley combines Chinatown with a cosmopolitan mix of clubs, cafés, and boutiques. Spring Hill has several high-quality hotels, and Paddington, New Farm, Petrie Terrace, West End, and Woolloongabba are full of an eclectic mix of restaurants and bars. Brisbane is also a convenient base for trips to the Sunshine and Gold coasts, the mountainous hinterlands, and the Moreton Bay islands.

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Tourism is the lifeblood of Cairns (pronounced Caans). The city makes a good base for exploring the wild top half of Queensland, and tens of thousands of international travelers use it as a jumping-off point for activities such as scuba diving and snorkeling trips to the Barrier Reef, as well as boating, fishing, parasailing, scenic flights, and rain-forest treks.It's a tough environment, with intense heat and fierce wildlife. Along with wallabies and grey kangaroos in the savannah and tree kangaroos in the rain forest, you'll find stealthy saltwater crocodiles, venomous snakes, and jellyfish so deadly they put the region’s stunning beaches off- limits to swimmers for nearly half the year. Yet despite this formidable setting, Cairns and tropical North Queensland are far from intimidating places. The people are warm and friendly, the sights spectacular, and—at the right time of year—the beachside lounging is world-class.

Day 8At Sea

Alotau is the provincial capital of the Milne Bay Province located in the southeast bay of Papua New Guinea. The town and surrounding area has been an important staging ground during World War II and we will see remains and memorials dating back or referring to the war. On a tour of the town, visitors will appreciate lovely vistas of the bay and experience the markets, which are frequented not only by locals, but also by islanders selling their products or looking for produce to take back into Milne Bay. Alotau is an important port facility for the islands and attracts many vendors of handicrafts from different islands.

Rabaul, the former provincial capital, has quite a remarkable location. The town is inside the flooded caldera of a giant volcano and several sub-vents are still quite active today! The fumes of the volcano Tavurvur can be seen continually and the town suffered greatly during the last major eruption of 1994 when some 80% of the houses collapsed due to the ash raining down onto their roofs. Rabaul has a Volcano Observatory sitting atop the town’s center, monitoring the 14 active and 23 dormant volcanoes in Papua New Guinea. A small museum opposite the bunker used by Yamamoto during World War II shows exhibits relating to Rabaul’s local, German, Australian and Japanese past from the 19th century to Papua New Guinea’s independence in the 1970s.

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Manila, the capital city of the Philippines, was founded in, 1571 by Spanish conquistador Miguel López de Legazpi. It is one of the oldest cities in the country and was the seat of power for most of the colonial rules of the Philippines. It is situated on the eastern shore of Manila Bay and contains a multitude of landmarks, some of which date back to the 16th century. It is home to the baroque 16th-century San Agustin Church as well as Fort Santiago, a storied citadel and military prison. In the 19th century Manila became one of the most modern cities in Asia. Before the Spanish–American War, Manila saw the rise of the Philippine Revolution. Under the American rule following the Spanish-American War, the United States changed the official language from Spanish to English. Towards the end of World War II, during the Battle of Manila, most of the city was flattened by intensive aerial bombardment. Today, tourism is a vital industry in Manila. Major shopping malls and bazaars thrive around Manila.

Manila, Philippines

Day 19At Sea

The Hong Kong Island skyline, with its ever-growing number of skyscrapers, speaks to ambition and money. Paris, London, even New York were centuries in the making, while Hong Kong's towers, bright lights, and glitzy shopping emporia weren't yet part of the urban scene when many of the young investment bankers who fuel one of the world's leading financial centers were born. Commerce is concentrated in the glittering high-rises of Central, tucked between Victoria Harbor and forested peaks on Hong Kong Island's north shore. While it's easy to think all the bright lights are the sum of today's Hong Kong, you need only walk or board a tram for the short jaunt west into Western to discover a side of Hong Kong that is more traditionally Chinese but no less high-energy. You'll discover the real Hong Kong to the east of Central, too, in Wan Chai, Causeway Bay, and beyond. Amid the residential towers are restaurants, shopping malls, bars, convention centers, a nice smattering of museums, and—depending on fate and the horse you wager on—one of Hong Kong's luckiest or unluckiest spots, the Happy Valley Racecourse. Kowloon sprawls across a generous swath of the Chinese mainland across Victoria Harbour from Central. Tsim Sha Tsui, at the tip of Kowloon peninsula, is packed with glitzy shops, first-rate museums, and eye-popping views of the skyline across the water. Just to the north are the teeming market streets of Mong Kok and in the dense residential neighborhoods beyond, two of Hong Kong's most enchanting spiritual sights, Wong Tai Sin Temple and Chi Lin Nunnery. As you navigate this huge metropolis (easy to do on the excellent transportation network), keep in mind that streets are usually numbered odd on one side, even on the other. There's no baseline for street numbers and no block-based numbering system, but street signs indicate building numbers for any given block.

Hong Kong skyline view from Victoria Peak

The Hong Kong Island skyline, with its ever-growing number of skyscrapers, speaks to ambition and money. Paris, London, even New York were centuries in the making, while Hong Kong's towers, bright lights, and glitzy shopping emporia weren't yet part of the urban scene when many of the young investment bankers who fuel one of the world's leading financial centers were born. Commerce is concentrated in the glittering high-rises of Central, tucked between Victoria Harbor and forested peaks on Hong Kong Island's north shore. While it's easy to think all the bright lights are the sum of today's Hong Kong, you need only walk or board a tram for the short jaunt west into Western to discover a side of Hong Kong that is more traditionally Chinese but no less high-energy. You'll discover the real Hong Kong to the east of Central, too, in Wan Chai, Causeway Bay, and beyond. Amid the residential towers are restaurants, shopping malls, bars, convention centers, a nice smattering of museums, and—depending on fate and the horse you wager on—one of Hong Kong's luckiest or unluckiest spots, the Happy Valley Racecourse. Kowloon sprawls across a generous swath of the Chinese mainland across Victoria Harbour from Central. Tsim Sha Tsui, at the tip of Kowloon peninsula, is packed with glitzy shops, first-rate museums, and eye-popping views of the skyline across the water. Just to the north are the teeming market streets of Mong Kok and in the dense residential neighborhoods beyond, two of Hong Kong's most enchanting spiritual sights, Wong Tai Sin Temple and Chi Lin Nunnery. As you navigate this huge metropolis (easy to do on the excellent transportation network), keep in mind that streets are usually numbered odd on one side, even on the other. There's no baseline for street numbers and no block-based numbering system, but street signs indicate building numbers for any given block.

Hong Kong skyline view from Victoria Peak

Day 22At Sea

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The main island of Singapore is shaped like a flattened diamond, 42 km (26 miles) east to west and 23 km (14 miles) north to south. Near the northern peak is the causeway leading to West Malaysia—Kuala Lumpur is less than four hours away by car. It is at the southern foot where you will find most of the city-state’s action, with its gleaming office towers, working docks, and futuristic "supertrees," which are solar-powered and serve as vertical gardens. Offshore are Sentosa and over 60 smaller islands, most uninhabited, that serve as bases for oil refining or as playgrounds and beach escapes from the city. To the east is Changi International Airport, connected to the city by metro, bus, and a tree-lined parkway. Of the island's total land area, more than half is built up, with the balance made up of parkland, farmland, plantations, swamp areas, and rain forest. Well-paved roads connect all parts of the island, and Singapore city has an excellent, and constantly expanding, public transportation system. The heart of Singapore's history and its modern wealth are in and around the Central Business District. The area includes the skyscrapers in the Central Business District, the 19th-century Raffles Hotel, the convention centers of Marina Square, on up to the top of Ft. Canning. Although most of old Singapore has been knocked down to make way for the modern city, most colonial landmarks have been preserved in the CBD, including early-19th-century buildings designed by the Irish architect George Coleman.

The main island of Singapore is shaped like a flattened diamond, 42 km (26 miles) east to west and 23 km (14 miles) north to south. Near the northern peak is the causeway leading to West Malaysia—Kuala Lumpur is less than four hours away by car. It is at the southern foot where you will find most of the city-state’s action, with its gleaming office towers, working docks, and futuristic "supertrees," which are solar-powered and serve as vertical gardens. Offshore are Sentosa and over 60 smaller islands, most uninhabited, that serve as bases for oil refining or as playgrounds and beach escapes from the city. To the east is Changi International Airport, connected to the city by metro, bus, and a tree-lined parkway. Of the island's total land area, more than half is built up, with the balance made up of parkland, farmland, plantations, swamp areas, and rain forest. Well-paved roads connect all parts of the island, and Singapore city has an excellent, and constantly expanding, public transportation system. The heart of Singapore's history and its modern wealth are in and around the Central Business District. The area includes the skyscrapers in the Central Business District, the 19th-century Raffles Hotel, the convention centers of Marina Square, on up to the top of Ft. Canning. Although most of old Singapore has been knocked down to make way for the modern city, most colonial landmarks have been preserved in the CBD, including early-19th-century buildings designed by the Irish architect George Coleman.

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Sri Lanka's capital and largest city, Colombo offers fine restaurants, a buzzing nightlife scene, and good museums, parks, and beautiful Buddhist temples that are all worth visiting. The beach resort of Mt. Lavinia is only a short taxi ride from the downtown area and offers a golden, sandy beach and sunset views to die for. As an exciting blur of colors and cultures, Colombo presents a neatly packaged microcosm of this island nation.

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Mauritius’ largest city, Port Louis is a vibrant and exciting place whose culture is a mix of African, Chinese and Indian influences. There are activities and sights to keep you busy and explore the different aspects of the city.

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Originally the home of the San and Khoisan people and later the Xhosa tribe, the area now known as Port Elizabeth became a landing place for passing European ships after Portuguese navigator Bartolomew Diaz arrived in Algoa Bay in 1488. As part of the Cape Colony, the British occupied the area during the Napoleonic Wars and it was they who built Fort Frederick here in 1799. Twenty-one years later 4,000 settlers arrived, becoming the first permanent British residents of South Africa and Port Elizabeth. Sir Rufane Donkin, Acting Governor of the Cape Colony, founded Port Elizabeth, naming the settlement after his late wife. The town underwent rapid growth after 1873 following the construction of the railway to Kimberley, and is now one of the country’s major seaports. Like most South African cities, miles of beautiful coastline surround Port Elizabeth. Algoa Bay combines warm water and fair breezes, making it a mecca for swimmers and water sports enthusiasts. Those interested in history can follow the Donkin Heritage Trail, past a succession of Victorian and Edwardian town houses, trim gardens and neo-Gothic churches. Just outside the town are a number of game reserves, including the famous Addo Elephant National Park.

Day 43At Sea

Sometimes referred to as the Mother City, Cape Town is the most famous port in South Africa and is influenced by many different cultures, including Dutch, British and Malay. The port was founded in 1652 by Dutch explorer Jan Van Riebeeck, and evidence of Dutch colonial rule remains throughout the region. The port is located on one of the world's most important trade routes, and is mainly a container port and handler of fresh fruit. Fishing is another vital industry, with large Asian fishing fleets using Cape Town as a logistical repair base for much of the year. The region is famous for its natural beauty, with the imposing Table Mountain and Lions Head, as well as the many nature reserves and botanical gardens such as Kirstenbosch which boasts an extensive range of indigenous plant life, including proteas and ferns. Cape Town's weather is mercurial, and can change from beautiful sunshine to dramatic thunderstorms within a short period. A local adage is that in Cape Town you can experience four seasons in one day.

Sometimes referred to as the Mother City, Cape Town is the most famous port in South Africa and is influenced by many different cultures, including Dutch, British and Malay. The port was founded in 1652 by Dutch explorer Jan Van Riebeeck, and evidence of Dutch colonial rule remains throughout the region. The port is located on one of the world's most important trade routes, and is mainly a container port and handler of fresh fruit. Fishing is another vital industry, with large Asian fishing fleets using Cape Town as a logistical repair base for much of the year. The region is famous for its natural beauty, with the imposing Table Mountain and Lions Head, as well as the many nature reserves and botanical gardens such as Kirstenbosch which boasts an extensive range of indigenous plant life, including proteas and ferns. Cape Town's weather is mercurial, and can change from beautiful sunshine to dramatic thunderstorms within a short period. A local adage is that in Cape Town you can experience four seasons in one day.

Day 46At Sea

Once a whaling station, Walvis Bay provides a gateway to the extraordinary desert landscapes of Namibia and is itself an area of unusual natural beauty. The showpiece of the Walvis Bay area is the natural lagoon where you can see flamingos in their thousands at certain times of the year, along with a variety of other wading birds such as the white pelican. Further inland you will find the stunning Namib Desert, which provides an unlikely home for a diverse array of wildlife. Alternatively, you could venture into the desert of Sossusvlei, whose mountainous ochre sand dunes are said to be the highest in the world, or visit the colonial town of Swakopmund.

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The largest of the Canary Islands, Tenerife is a beautiful and scenic island which enjoys year-round sunshine and is dominated by Mount Teide. The mountain range runs through the centre of the island, with fertile valleys on the northern side. In the central part of the range is the gigantic natural crater of the Cañadas del Teide, about 14 miles in diameter. Santa Cruz, the island’s pretty capital, was originally a small fishing village but has now grown into a modern city, and also contains 16th-century civic buildings and ornate private mansions. Near the pier is the Santa Cruz Palmetum, a Botanical Garden covering an area of 29 acres, specialising in palms.

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Southampton is the UK's largest and busiest cruise port, catering for over 1.5 million passengers every year. Located just a two hour drive out of London, or an 80-minute train journey, Southampton has a rich history on display across the city's museums and cultural venues, as well as leading shopping shopping outlets, many restaurants and bars, and award-winning public parks. Walking around the city centre, you'll see many remnants of the ancient city walls, don't miss the Bargate Monument – a Grade I-listed medieval gatehouse. Further afield, you can take in the sights of nearby cities of Portsmouth and Winchester, or visit the world-renowned heritage site of Stonehenge.

Boats in Southampton Harbour

The ship Queen Victoria

Queen Victoria will delight you with her special appeal, where elegance and unique features combine seamlessly with outstanding hospitality. You’ll discover an extraordinary way to see the world.

Capacity
2061
Cabins
1037
Total crew
981
Length
964m

Food and drink

Queen Victoria maintains Cunard's proud culinary traditions, with three main restaurants and the elegant new Verandah Restaurant. All offering delicious menus created by Cunard’s Global Culinary Ambassador, Jean-Marie Zimmermann.

There's also a host of alternative dining options from the relaxed Lido Buffet and Golden Lion Pub, through to a variety of tempting global cuisines.

Queen's Grill

The Queen's Grill is a luxurious, fine-dining venue reserved exclusively for Queens Grill Suite passengers. The elegant restaurant is open for breakfast,... Read more

Complimentary
Fine

Princess Grill

The Princess Grill offers an intimate, fine dining experience, reserved exclusively for Princess Grill Suite passengers. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner,... Read more

Complimentary
Fine

Britannia & Britannia Club Restaurant

Make a dramatic entrance down the grand staircase into the elegant Britannia two tier dining room and revel in the sumptuous menus... Read more

Complimentary
Fine

The Verandah

The Verandah is Queen Victoria's formal alternative dining venue and is your invitation to savour contemporary French cuisine that uses traditional ingredients... Read more

Cover
French

The Lido Restaurant

Should you prefer a club sandwich or a light bite in the afternoon head for the Lido restaurant where buffet dining is... Read more

Cover
Regional

Golden Lion Pub

The Golden Lion is an authentic British pub with a great selection of beer and cider. This is complemented by a traditional... Read more

Cover
British

Entertainment

Queen Victoria provides you with a wealth of engaging experiences to keep you entertained day and night. From the glamorous Royal Night Balls, to the excitement of the Empire Casino, there's something to keep everyone happy.

The Royal Court Theatre

Designed in an elegant opera house style, The Royal Court Theatre showcases classic and modern films during the afternoon, with fantastic live... Read more

Queens Room

The wonderful Queens Room provides the opportunity to foxtrot in the largest ballroom at sea. There is no better place to hone... Read more

Hemispheres

By day admire the expansive panoramic views that stretch from horizon to horizon, and by night dance to the beat of the... Read more

Empire Casino

This elegant casino will set your heart racing as you spin the roulette wheel, play the slots or try your hand at... Read more

Galleries

Art connoisseurs can enjoy a choice of three galleries. Cladendon Fine Art features original artwork and lithographs by 20th and 21st century... Read more

Shopping

The ship features a variety of shops for those who enjoy a spot of retail therapy. Passengers can find designer brands in... Read more

Commodore Club

Located on deck 10 at the front of the ship, the Commodore Club provides magnificent views across the ocean or your delightful... Read more

Cafe Carinthia

Located in a central position on Deck 2, overlooking the Grand Lobby, Cafe Carinthia is the perfect place to sit and relax... Read more

Champagne Bar

In the Veuve Cliquot Champagne Bar on deck 2, guests may choose from an extensive range of Veuve Cliquot Champagnes, served by... Read more

The Golden Lion Pub

A Cunard favourite, choose from a wide selection of beer, cider and wine to compliment the delicious gastro pub style menus in... Read more

Churchill's Cigar Lounge

Churchill's Cigar Lounge is located on deck 10.

Winter Garden

The Winter Garden is the grand conservatory filled with greenery, offering views across the horizon in almost every direction. 

Health and fitness

The ship features a fantastic array of health and fitness facilities for passengers that wish to stay active or relax and be pampered. These include, a spa, a fitness centre, a games deck, sports courts and much more.

Royal Spa

The Royal Spa, takes you on a blissful journey of relaxation, thanks to its range of innovative and indulgent treatments, massages and... Read more

Fitness Centre

Passengers who wish to stay active can make use of the fully equipped gymnasium. As well as state of the art gym... Read more

Swimming Pools

In warm weather, deck 9 is the place to be with a choice of two inviting swimming pools, The Pavilion and The... Read more

Sports

The ship also offers a wide variety of sports facilities for passengers who want to stay active during their cruise. These fantastic... Read more

Games Deck

When the warm weather entices you onto the spacious Games Deck you’ll notice a definite English country garden ambience, with the gentle... Read more

Kids and teens

For younger cruise passengers, there are a number of facilities available to keep them entertained. Running primarily during the school holidays, kids clubs are available for children or teens travelling on Queen Victoria.

Night Nursery

Open between 6pm – 11pm, the Night Nursery operates on a first come, first served basis. Providing trained childcare for 12-23 month... Read more

Play Zone

Designed for 2-7s, Play Zone provides a supervised play area for some of Cunard’s youngest passengers. The club features arts and crafts,... Read more

Kids Zone

A supervised play area for 8-12s, Kids Zone provides games, consoles, activities, arts and crafts for kids to enjoy, along with sports... Read more

Teen Zone

The Teen Zone is a club for the 13-17 year olds. Activities will include table tennis tournaments, team games and deck sports... Read more

Enrichment

Enrichment programs and lectures on contemporary and classical subjects are popular features on Cunard cruises. Queen Victoria covers a wide range of activities from ballroom dancing to computing lessons.

Cunard Insights

Explore a number of historical and contemporary issues presented by a wide range of speakers including explorers, academics, former ambassadors and politicians,... Read more

Cunard ConneXions

Cunard ConneXions offers a programme of activities all day every day from watercolour to computer lessons, wine tasting to ballroom dancing as... Read more

Book Club

The Cunard Book Club offers the opportunity for thought-provoking literary discussions among guests during each voyage. It is led by the Librarian... Read more

Useful info

Special Dietary Requirements

The ship can cater for the following dietary requirements on request: vegetarian, low /no fat low salt /no salt, lactose intolerant ,... Read more

Dress Code

During the day casual shirts, shorts, trousers and beachwear are ideal. The main restaurants require a casual dress code for breakfast and... Read more

Disabled Facilites

Fully accessible adapted cabins are available onboard the ship and some suites are also suitable for wheelchair users as the cabin door... Read more

Smoking & E-cigarette Policy

There are dedicated areas on the ship where passengers are permitted to smoke. Smoking is not permitted in any public room, inside... Read more

Age Restrictions

Children older than six months may travel, however Transatlantic crossings have a minimum age requirement of 12 months. Guests under 16 years... Read more

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* Passengers should be aged under 18 at the time of embarkation to qualify as a child.
Prices shown are per person based on two people sharing (unless otherwise specfied) in GBP and subject to availability. Certain restrictions can apply. Prices are updated on a daily basis and may vary when continuing through the booking process.