Cunard

49-night Southampton To Sydney

Queen Victoria

Queen Victoria will delight you with her special appeal, where elegance and unique features combine seamlessly with outstanding hospitality. You’ll discover an extraordinary way to see the world.

Explore the ship
Itinerary highlights
Boats in Southampton Harbour Southampton United Kingdom
King's Wharf Bermuda
Port Canaveral, Florida United States of America
Ship highlights
Photo of the Queen's Grill Queen's Grill
Photo of the Cunard Insights Cunard Insights
Photo of the Cunard ConneXions Cunard ConneXions
from
£7,599
per person
from
£155
per night
10 Jan 2022
£7,599
10 Jan 2022
£8,339
10 Jan 2022
£10,909
10 Jan 2022
Book from £7,599 Email me this cruise

The itinerary

Southampton is the UK's largest and busiest cruise port, catering for over 1.5 million passengers every year. Located just a two hour drive out of London, or an 80-minute train journey, Southampton has a rich history on display across the city's museums and cultural venues, as well as leading shopping shopping outlets, many restaurants and bars, and award-winning public parks. Walking around the city centre, you'll see many remnants of the ancient city walls, don't miss the Bargate Monument – a Grade I-listed medieval gatehouse. Further afield, you can take in the sights of nearby cities of Portsmouth and Winchester, or visit the world-renowned heritage site of Stonehenge.

Boats in Southampton Harbour

Day 2At Sea

Day 3At Sea

Day 4At Sea

Day 5At Sea

Day 6At Sea

Day 7At Sea

You go to heaven if you want - I'd rather stay here in Bermuda!' So gushed Mark Twain in the 19th century, and Bermuda's promise of sun and sea still lures holiday-makers to its shores. Settled by the English Virginia Company in 1609, Bermuda is the oldest and most populous of Britain's remaining overseas territories. These days, celebrities like Michael Douglas and Catherine Zeta-Jones call Bermuda home. The island is surrounded by a fantastic coral reef that harbours colourful fish and has ensnared scores of shipwrecks, making for memorable diving and snorkelling.

Day 9At Sea

Day 10At Sea

Widely known for the Kennedy Space Center, Port Canaveral is located in the city of Cape Canaveral, home to beautiful beaches and Brevard Zoo. It's now the fastest-growing cruise port in Florida and is located just 45 miles east of Orlando. This makes it the perfect opportunity to arrive a few days early for your cruise and combine it with some theme park thrills or some futuristic space adventures!

With over 480km of waterways, Fort Lauderdale is the 'Venice of America' and the yachting capital of the world. The city's cruise port, Port Everglades is the third busiest in the world, catering to almost four million passengers every year. Before you head to your ship, check out the 2-mile Las Olas Boulevard, filled with chic cafés, independent boutiques and entertainment venues. A stroll along the tree-lined promenade and beautiful sand beaches, will give you the perfect taster of what's in store on your sun-soaked cruise itinerary.

Day 13At Sea

Day 14At Sea

Day 15At Sea

Oranjestad, Aruba's capital, is easily explored on foot. Its palm-lined central thoroughfare runs between old and new pastel-painted buildings of typical Dutch design (Spanish influence is also evident in some of the architecture). There are a lot of malls with boutiques and shops—the Renaissance mall carries high-end luxury items and designer fashions. A massive renovation in downtown has given Main Street (a.k.a. Caya G. F. Betico Croes) a whole new lease on life: boutique malls, shops, and restaurants have opened next to well-loved family-run businesses. Stroll along the boardwalk from the city centre to the Palm Beach area of Aruba, filled with resorts, restaurants, nightclubs and more. Cruise ships dock at Aruba Port Authority, around a 10 minute walk from the centre of Oranjestad.

Day 17At Sea

Day 18Daylight transit of Panama Canal

Day 19At Sea

Impenetrable forests, impassable mountains, and endless fields of ice define Chilean Patagonia, and meant that the region went largely unexplored until the beginning of the 20th century. Located in the southernmost part of the country, this area is still sparsely inhabited, though you will find a few populated places—like the colorful provincial city of Punta Arenas, which looks like it's about to be swept into the Strait of Magellan. Some unique wildlife, particularly colonies of elephant seals and penguins, call this breathtaking topography home. To the north is Parque Nacional Torres del Paine, the country's most magnificent natural wonder, and whose snow-covered peaks seem to rise vertically from the plains below. The vistas, such as the fantastic Avenue of the Glaciers, are breathtaking; along this stretch of the Beagle Channel, you can pass six tremendous glaciers all within a stone's throw of each other.Cruise SightsPunta Arenas. Founded a little more than 150 years ago, Punta Arenas (Sandy Point) was Chile's first permanent settlement in Patagonia. Plaza Muñoz Gamero, the central square, is surrounded by evidence of that early prosperity: buildings whose then-opulent brick exteriors recall a time when this was one of Chile's wealthiest cities. The newer houses here have colorful tin roofs, best appreciated when seen from a high vantage point such as the Mirador Cerro la Cruz. Although the city as a whole may not be particularly attractive, look for details: the pink-and-white house on a corner, the bay window full of potted plants, parking attendants wearing the regional blue and yellow colors, and schoolchildren in identical naval pea coats that remind you that the city's fate is tied to the sea.The Museo Naval y Marítimo extols Chile's high-seas prowess, particularly concerning Antarctica. Its exhibits are worth a visit for anyone with an interest in ships and sailing, merchant and military alike. Part of the second floor is designed like the interior of a ship, including a map and radio room. Pedro Montt 989. Admission charged.Housed in what was once the mansion of the powerful Braun-Menéndez family, the Museo Regional de Magallanes is an intriguing glimpse into the daily life of a wealthy provincial family at the beginning of the 20th century. Lavish Carrara marble hearths, English bath fixtures, and cordovan leather walls are among the original accoutrements. The museum also has an excellent group of displays depicting Punta Arenas's past, from the first European contact to the town's decline after the opening of the Panama Canal. The museum is half a block north of the main square. Magallanes 949. Admission charged.The resplendent 1895 Palacio Sara Braun is a national landmark and an architectural showpiece of southern Patagonia. Designed by a French architect, the house was built from materials and by craftsmen imported from Europe during the four years of construction. The city's central plaza and surrounding buildings soon followed, ushering in the region's golden era. Noteworthy are the lavish bedrooms, magnificent parquet floors, marble fireplaces, and hand-painted ceilings. Don't miss the portraits of Braun and her husband José Nogueira in the music room. Afterwards, head to the cellar for a drink or snack in the warm public tavern (a good portion of the mansion is leased to a hotel). Plaza Muñoz Gamero 716. Admission charged.Commonly referred to simply as "El Salesiano," the Museo Salesiano de Maggiorino Borgatello is operated by Italian missionaries whose order arrived in Punta Arenas in the 19th century. The Salesians, most of whom spoke no Spanish, proved to be daring explorers. Traveling throughout the region, they collected the artifacts made by indigenous tribes that are currently on display. Av. Bulnes 398. Admission charged.Isla Magdalena. Punta Arenas is the launching point for a boat trip to the Isla Magdalena to see the more than 100,000 Magellanic penguins at the Monumento Natural Los Pingúinos. A single trail, marked off by rope, is accessible to humans. The boat trip to the island, in the middle of the Estrecho de Magallanes, takes about two hours. Make sure to bring along warm clothing, even in summer; the island can be chilly, particularly if a breeze is blowing across the water.Parque Nacional Torres del Paine. Some 12 million years ago, lava flows pushed up through the thick sedimentary crust that covered the southwestern coast of South America, cooling to form a granite mass. Glaciers then swept through the region, grinding away all but the ash-gray spires that rise over the landscape of one of the world's most beautiful natural phenomena, now the Parque Nacional Torres del Paine (established in 1959). Snow formations dazzle along every turn of road, and the sunset views are spectacular.Among the 2,420-square-km (934-square-mi) park's most beautiful attractions are its lakes of turquoise, aquamarine, and emerald green waters. Another draw is its unusual wildlife. Creatures like the guanaco (a woollier version of the llama) and the ñandú (resembling a small ostrich) abound. They are used to visitors and don't seem to be bothered by the proximity of automobile traffic and the snapping of cameras. Predators, like the gray fox, make less frequent appearances. You may also spot the dramatic aerobatics of a falcon and the graceful soaring of the endangered condor. The beautiful puma is especially elusive, but sightings have become more common. Admission charged.Pingúinera de Seno Otway. The road to this penguin sanctuary begins 30 km (18 mi) north of Punta Arenas. Magellanic penguins, which live up to 20 years in the wild, return to their birthplace here every year to mate with the same partner. For about 2,000 penguin couples—no single penguins make the trip—home is this desolate and windswept land off the Otway Sound. In late September, the penguins begin to arrive from the southern coast of Brazil and the Falkland Islands. They mate and lay their eggs in early October, and brood their eggs in November. Offspring hatch between mid-November and early December. If you're lucky, you may catch sight of one of the downy gray chicks that stick their heads out of the burrows when their parents return to feed them. Otherwise you might see scores of the ungainly adult penguins waddling to the ocean from their nesting burrows. They swim for food every eight hours and dive up to 100 feet deep. The penguins depart from the sound in late March. Note that the sanctuary is a 1-km (1/2-mi) walk from the parking lot. It gets chilly, so bring a windbreaker. Admission charged.Reserva Nacional Laguna Parillar. This 47,000-acre reserve lies west of Puerto Hambre, a tranquil fishing village, and is centered around a shimmering lake in a valley flanked by hills. It's a great place for a picnic, and there are a number of well-marked paths that offer sweeping vistas over the Estrecho de Magallanes. About 2 km (1 mi) west of Puerto Hambre is a small white monolith that marks the geographical center of Chile, the midway point between Chile's northern port Arica and the South Pole.Cruise ShoppingWool may no longer be king of the economy, but vast flocks of sheep still yield a high-quality product that is woven into the clothing here. Leather products are also common, but the prices are not necessarily low. About 3 km (2 mi) north of Punta Arenas is the Zona Franca (Av. Bulnes). This duty-free zone is where people from all around the region come for low-priced electronics and other consumer items.

Day 21At Sea

Day 22At Sea

Day 23At Sea

Cabo San Lucas is the jewel of Mexico's Baja peninsula. The arching stone cliffs, known as Land's End, are one of Cabo's most famous landmarks and is the point where the Pacific becomes the Gulf of California. Watersport opportunites in Cabo are endless – kitesurfing, horseback riding, diving, jet-skiing, banana-boat riding are all available right from the beautiful white sand beaches. If you're visiting in the winter, look out for pods of whales who migrate to the warm waters near Cabo to birth their calves.

Day 25At Sea

Day 26At Sea

With its myriad hills and spectacular bay, San Francisco beguiles with natural beauty, vibrant neighborhoods, and contagious energy. From the hipster Mission District to the sassy Castro, from bustling Union Square to enduring Chinatown, this dynamic town thrives on variety. The city makes it wonderfully easy to tap into the good life, too: between San Francisco's hot arts scene, tempting boutiques, parks perfect for jogging or biking, and all those stellar locavore restaurants and cocktail bars, it's the ultimate destination for relaxed self-indulgence.

Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco, United States

With its myriad hills and spectacular bay, San Francisco beguiles with natural beauty, vibrant neighborhoods, and contagious energy. From the hipster Mission District to the sassy Castro, from bustling Union Square to enduring Chinatown, this dynamic town thrives on variety. The city makes it wonderfully easy to tap into the good life, too: between San Francisco's hot arts scene, tempting boutiques, parks perfect for jogging or biking, and all those stellar locavore restaurants and cocktail bars, it's the ultimate destination for relaxed self-indulgence.

Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco, United States

Day 29At Sea

Day 30At Sea

Day 31At Sea

Day 32At Sea

Capital of Hawaii on the island of Oahu, and a popular tourist destination, Honolulu is renowned for its world-beating surfing and water sports spots. However, there's far more to the city than surfing; with museums, the only royal palace in the country, and even the world's largest open-air shopping mall, there's bound to be something to entice any visitor. There are two cruise terminals at Honolulu Harbour – Pier 11 is located in the heart of the city, next to the iconic Aloha Tower, whilst Pier 2 is located a little further out of town.

Day 34At Sea

Day 35At Sea

Day 36At Sea

Day 37At Sea

Day 38At Sea

Day 39At Sea

Samoa is a group of ten islands located in the South Pacific. The tropical climate and volcanic landscape create a picturesque location for visitors to explore, together with the experience of Fa'a Samoa, the three thousand year old way of life on Samoa.

Day 41At Sea

Fiji is a collection of tropical islands in the South Pacific and is well known for soft coral diving, white sandy beaches, and idyllic and peaceful surroundings. Because of its paradisiac surroundings, Fiji is a popular location for weddings and honeymoons. Suva is the capital of the Fiji archipelago, located on the southeastern coast of the island of Viti Levu and is the second most populated city of Fiji.

Day 43At Sea

Day 44At Sea

Day 45At Sea

The population center of the Bay of Plenty, Tauranga is one of New Zealand's fastest-growing cities. Along with its neighbor, Whakatane, this seaside city claims to be one of the country's sunniest towns. Unlike most local towns, Tauranga doesn't grind to a halt in the off-season, because it has one of the busiest ports in the country, and the excellent waves at the neighboring beach resort of Mount Maunganui—just across Tauranga's harbor bridge—always draw surfers and holiday folk.

Auckland is called the City of Sails, and visitors flying in will see why. On the East Coast is the Waitemata Harbour—a Māori word meaning sparkling waters—which is bordered by the Hauraki Gulf, an aquatic playground peppered with small islands where many Aucklanders can be found "mucking around in boats."Not surprisingly, Auckland has some 70,000 boats. About one in four households in Auckland has a seacraft of some kind, and there are 102 beaches within an hour's drive; during the week many are quite empty. Even the airport is by the water; it borders the Manukau Harbour, which also takes its name from the Māori language and means solitary bird.According to Māori tradition, the Auckland isthmus was originally peopled by a race of giants and fairy folk. When Europeans arrived in the early 19th century, however, the Ngāti-Whātua tribe was firmly in control of the region. The British began negotiations with the Ngāti-Whātua in 1840 to purchase the isthmus and establish the colony's first capital. In September of that year the British flag was hoisted to mark the township's foundation, and Auckland remained the capital until 1865, when the seat of government was moved to Wellington. Aucklanders expected to suffer from the shift; it hurt their pride but not their pockets. As the terminal for the South Sea shipping routes, Auckland was already an established commercial center. Since then the urban sprawl has made this city of approximately 1.3 million people one of the world's largest geographically.A couple of days in the city will reveal just how developed and sophisticated Auckland is—the Mercer City Survey 2012 saw it ranked as the third-highest city for quality of life—though those seeking a New York in the South Pacific will be disappointed. Auckland is more get-up and go-outside than get-dressed-up and go-out. That said, most shops are open daily, central bars and a few nightclubs buzz well into the wee hours, especially Thursday through Saturday, and a mix of Māori, Pacific people, Asians, and Europeans contributes to the cultural milieu. Auckland has the world's largest single population of Pacific Islanders living outside their home countries, though many of them live outside the central parts of the city and in Manukau to the south. The Samoan language is the second most spoken in New Zealand. Most Pacific people came to New Zealand seeking a better life. When the plentiful, low-skilled work that attracted them dried up, the dream soured, and the population has suffered with poor health and education. Luckily, policies are now addressing that, and change is slowly coming. The Pacifica Festival in March is the region's biggest cultural event, attracting thousands to Western Springs. The annual Pacific Island Secondary Schools’ Competition, also in March, sees young Pacific Islander and Asian students compete in traditional dance, drumming, and singing. This event is open to the public.At the geographical center of Auckland city is the 1,082-foot Sky Tower, a convenient landmark for those exploring on foot and some say a visible sign of the city's naked aspiration. It has earned nicknames like the Needle and the Big Penis—a counterpoint to a poem by acclaimed New Zealand poet James K. Baxter, which refers to Rangitoto Island as a clitoris in the harbor.The Waitemata Harbour has become better known since New Zealand staged its first defense of the America's Cup in 2000 and the successful Louis Vuitton Pacific Series in early 2009. The first regatta saw major redevelopment of the waterfront. The area, where many of the city's most popular bars, cafés, and restaurants are located, is now known as Viaduct Basin or, more commonly, the Viaduct. A recent expansion has created another area, Wynyard Quarter, which is slowly adding restaurants.These days, Auckland is still considered too bold and brash for its own good by many Kiwis who live "south of the Bombay Hills," the geographical divide between Auckland and the rest of New Zealand (barring Northland). "Jafa," an acronym for "just another f—ing Aucklander," has entered the local lexicon; there's even a book out called Way of the Jafa: A Guide to Surviving Auckland and Aucklanders. A common complaint is that Auckland absorbs the wealth from the hard work of the rest of the country. Most Aucklanders, on the other hand, still try to shrug and see it as the parochial envy of those who live in small towns. But these internal identity squabbles aren't your problem. You can enjoy a well-made coffee in almost any café, or take a walk on a beach—knowing that within 30 minutes' driving time you could be cruising the spectacular harbor, playing a round at a public golf course, or even walking in subtropical forest while listening to the song of a native tûî bird.

The Tasman Sea on the west and the Pacific Ocean on the east meet at thetop of North Island at Cape Reinga. No matter what route you take, you'll passfarms and forests, marvellous beaches, and great open spaces. The East Coast,up to the Bay of Islands, is Northland's most densely populated, often withrefugees from bigger cities—looking for a more relaxed life—clustered aroundbreathtaking beaches. The first decision on the drive north comes at the footof the Brynderwyn Hills. Turning left will take you up the West Coast throughareas once covered with forests and now used for either agricultural orhorticulture. Driving over "the Brynderwyns," as they are known,takes you to Whangarei, the only city in Northland. If you're in the mood for adiversion, you can slip to the beautiful coastline and take in Waipu Cove, anarea settled by Scots, and Laings Beach, where million-dollar homes sit next tosmall Kiwi beach houses.An hour's drive farther north is the Bay of Islands, known all over theworld for its beauty. There you will find lush forests, splendid beaches, andshimmering harbors. The Treaty of Waitangi was signed here in 1840 betweenMāoriand the British Crown, establishing the basis for the modern New Zealandstate. Every year on February 6, the extremely beautiful Waitangi Treaty Ground(the name means weeping waters) is the sight of a celebration of the treaty andprotests by Māori unhappy with it. Continuing north on the East Coast, theagricultural backbone of the region is even more evident and a series ofwinding loop roads off the main highway will take you to beaches that are bothbeautiful and isolated where you can swim, dive, picnic, or just laze. .The West Coast is even less populated, and the coastline is rugged andwindswept. In the Waipoua Forest, you will find some of New Zealand's oldestand largest kauri trees; the winding road will also take you past mangroveswamps. Crowning the region is the spiritually significant Cape Reinga, theheadland at the top of the vast stretch of 90 Mile Beach, where it's believedMāori souls depart after death. Today Māori make up roughly a quarter of thearea's population (compared with the national average of about 15%). The legendaryMāori navigator Kupe was said to have landed on the shores of Hokianga Harbour,where the first arrivals made their home. Many different wi (tribes) livedthroughout Northland, including Ngapuhi (the largest), Te Roroa, Ngati Wai,Ngati Kuri, Te Aupouri, Ngaitakoto, Ngati Kahu, and Te Rarawa. Many Māoriherecan trace their ancestry to the earliest inhabitants

Day 49At Sea

Day 50At Sea

Sydney belongs to the exclusive club of cities that generate excitement. At the end of a marathon flight there's renewed vitality in the cabin as the plane circles the city, where thousands of yachts are suspended on the dark water and the sails of the Opera House glisten in the distance. Blessed with dazzling beaches and a sunny climate, Sydney is among the most beautiful cities on the planet.With 4.6 million people, Sydney is the biggest and most cosmopolitan city in Australia. A wave of immigration from the 1950s has seen the Anglo-Irish immigrants who made up the city's original population joined by Italians, Greeks, Turks, Lebanese, Chinese, Vietnamese, Thais, and Indonesians. This intermingling has created a cultural vibrancy and energy—and a culinary repertoire—that was missing only a generation ago.Sydneysiders embrace their harbor with a passion. Indented with numerous bays and beaches, Sydney Harbour is the presiding icon for the city, and urban Australia. Captain Arthur Phillip, commander of the 11-ship First Fleet, wrote in his diary when he first set eyes on the harbor on January 26, 1788: "We had the satisfaction of finding the finest harbor in the world."Although a visit to Sydney is an essential part of an Australian experience, the city is no more representative of Australia than Los Angeles is of the United States. Sydney has joined the ranks of the great cities whose characters are essentially international. What Sydney offers is style, sophistication, and great looks—an exhilarating prelude to the continent at its back door.

The ship Queen Victoria

Queen Victoria will delight you with her special appeal, where elegance and unique features combine seamlessly with outstanding hospitality. You’ll discover an extraordinary way to see the world.

Capacity
2061
Cabins
1037
Total crew
981
Length
964m

Food and drink

Queen Victoria maintains Cunard's proud culinary traditions, with three main restaurants and the elegant new Verandah Restaurant. All offering delicious menus created by Cunard’s Global Culinary Ambassador, Jean-Marie Zimmermann.

There's also a host of alternative dining options from the relaxed Lido Buffet and Golden Lion Pub, through to a variety of tempting global cuisines.

Queen's Grill

The Queen's Grill is a luxurious, fine-dining venue reserved exclusively for Queens Grill Suite passengers. The elegant restaurant is open for breakfast,... Read more

Complimentary
Fine

Princess Grill

The Princess Grill offers an intimate, fine dining experience, reserved exclusively for Princess Grill Suite passengers. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner,... Read more

Complimentary
Fine

Britannia & Britannia Club Restaurant

Make a dramatic entrance down the grand staircase into the elegant Britannia two tier dining room and revel in the sumptuous menus... Read more

Complimentary
Fine

The Verandah

The Verandah is Queen Victoria's formal alternative dining venue and is your invitation to savour contemporary French cuisine that uses traditional ingredients... Read more

Cover
French

The Lido Restaurant

Should you prefer a club sandwich or a light bite in the afternoon head for the Lido restaurant where buffet dining is... Read more

Cover
Regional

Golden Lion Pub

The Golden Lion is an authentic British pub with a great selection of beer and cider. This is complemented by a traditional... Read more

Cover
British

Entertainment

Queen Victoria provides you with a wealth of engaging experiences to keep you entertained day and night. From the glamorous Royal Night Balls, to the excitement of the Empire Casino, there's something to keep everyone happy.

The Royal Court Theatre

Designed in an elegant opera house style, The Royal Court Theatre showcases classic and modern films during the afternoon, with fantastic live... Read more

Queens Room

The wonderful Queens Room provides the opportunity to foxtrot in the largest ballroom at sea. There is no better place to hone... Read more

Hemispheres

By day admire the expansive panoramic views that stretch from horizon to horizon, and by night dance to the beat of the... Read more

Empire Casino

This elegant casino will set your heart racing as you spin the roulette wheel, play the slots or try your hand at... Read more

Galleries

Art connoisseurs can enjoy a choice of three galleries. Cladendon Fine Art features original artwork and lithographs by 20th and 21st century... Read more

Shopping

The ship features a variety of shops for those who enjoy a spot of retail therapy. Passengers can find designer brands in... Read more

Commodore Club

Located on deck 10 at the front of the ship, the Commodore Club provides magnificent views across the ocean or your delightful... Read more

Cafe Carinthia

Located in a central position on Deck 2, overlooking the Grand Lobby, Cafe Carinthia is the perfect place to sit and relax... Read more

Champagne Bar

In the Veuve Cliquot Champagne Bar on deck 2, guests may choose from an extensive range of Veuve Cliquot Champagnes, served by... Read more

The Golden Lion Pub

A Cunard favourite, choose from a wide selection of beer, cider and wine to compliment the delicious gastro pub style menus in... Read more

Churchill's Cigar Lounge

Churchill's Cigar Lounge is located on deck 10.

Winter Garden

The Winter Garden is the grand conservatory filled with greenery, offering views across the horizon in almost every direction. 

Health and fitness

The ship features a fantastic array of health and fitness facilities for passengers that wish to stay active or relax and be pampered. These include, a spa, a fitness centre, a games deck, sports courts and much more.

Royal Spa

The Royal Spa, takes you on a blissful journey of relaxation, thanks to its range of innovative and indulgent treatments, massages and... Read more

Fitness Centre

Passengers who wish to stay active can make use of the fully equipped gymnasium. As well as state of the art gym... Read more

Swimming Pools

In warm weather, deck 9 is the place to be with a choice of two inviting swimming pools, The Pavilion and The... Read more

Sports

The ship also offers a wide variety of sports facilities for passengers who want to stay active during their cruise. These fantastic... Read more

Games Deck

When the warm weather entices you onto the spacious Games Deck you’ll notice a definite English country garden ambience, with the gentle... Read more

Kids and teens

For younger cruise passengers, there are a number of facilities available to keep them entertained. Running primarily during the school holidays, kids clubs are available for children or teens travelling on Queen Victoria.

Night Nursery

Open between 6pm – 11pm, the Night Nursery operates on a first come, first served basis. Providing trained childcare for 12-23 month... Read more

Play Zone

Designed for 2-7s, Play Zone provides a supervised play area for some of Cunard’s youngest passengers. The club features arts and crafts,... Read more

Kids Zone

A supervised play area for 8-12s, Kids Zone provides games, consoles, activities, arts and crafts for kids to enjoy, along with sports... Read more

Teen Zone

The Teen Zone is a club for the 13-17 year olds. Activities will include table tennis tournaments, team games and deck sports... Read more

Enrichment

Enrichment programs and lectures on contemporary and classical subjects are popular features on Cunard cruises. Queen Victoria covers a wide range of activities from ballroom dancing to computing lessons.

Cunard Insights

Explore a number of historical and contemporary issues presented by a wide range of speakers including explorers, academics, former ambassadors and politicians,... Read more

Cunard ConneXions

Cunard ConneXions offers a programme of activities all day every day from watercolour to computer lessons, wine tasting to ballroom dancing as... Read more

Book Club

The Cunard Book Club offers the opportunity for thought-provoking literary discussions among guests during each voyage. It is led by the Librarian... Read more

Useful info

Special Dietary Requirements

The ship can cater for the following dietary requirements on request: vegetarian, low /no fat low salt /no salt, lactose intolerant ,... Read more

Dress Code

During the day casual shirts, shorts, trousers and beachwear are ideal. The main restaurants require a casual dress code for breakfast and... Read more

Disabled Facilites

Fully accessible adapted cabins are available onboard the ship and some suites are also suitable for wheelchair users as the cabin door... Read more

Smoking & E-cigarette Policy

There are dedicated areas on the ship where passengers are permitted to smoke. Smoking is not permitted in any public room, inside... Read more

Age Restrictions

Children older than six months may travel, however Transatlantic crossings have a minimum age requirement of 12 months. Guests under 16 years... Read more

Sailing
Cabin
Details
Payment

Choose a sailing to book

Interior
Window
Balcony
Suite
Flights available from Any London airport
Book with confidence

We know these are uncertain times, but don't fret. All bookings are covered by our Financial Protection Guarantee and we only work with cruise lines that are members of ATOL and ABTA. For more information about cancellation cover, visit the Coronavirus Cancellation Policies page.

How many people will be travelling?


* Passengers should be aged under 18 at the time of embarkation to qualify as a child.
Prices shown are per person based on two people sharing (unless otherwise specfied) in GBP and subject to availability. Certain restrictions can apply. Prices are updated on a daily basis and may vary when continuing through the booking process.