Celebrity Cruises

12-night Portugal, Spain & France

Celebrity Reflection

The newest ship in the fleet, Celebrity Reflection offers the finest Solstice Class features and amenities to create a relaxing, premium cruise experience

Explore the ship
Itinerary highlights
Amsterdam Netherlands
Riverside view in Bruges, Belgium Bruges Belgium
Le Havre France
Ship highlights
Photo of the Tuscan Grille Tuscan Grille
Photo of the Library Library
Photo of the Celebrity iLounge Celebrity iLounge
from
£1,554
per person
from
£130
per night
Free cancellation up to 30 days before you sail through 30 April 2022
4 Sep 2021
£1,569 £1,554
4 Sep 2021
£1,788
4 Sep 2021
£2,100 £1,788
4 Sep 2021
£4,014 £3,894
Book from £1,554 Email me this cruise

Cruise with Confidence

Cancel your cruise for free up to 48 hours before your sail date and get a future cruise credit valid for at least 12 months. Applies to any booking made before 31st January 2021.

Find out more

The itinerary

Amsterdam combines the unrivaled beauty of the 17th-century Golden Age city center with plenty of museums and art of the highest order, not to mention a remarkably laid-back atmosphere. It all comes together to make this one of the world's most appealing and offbeat metropolises in the world. Built on a latticework of concentric canals like an aquatic rainbow, Amsterdam is known as the City of Canals—but it's no Venice, content to live on moonlight serenades and former glory. Quite the contrary: on nearly every street here you'll find old and new side by side—quiet corners where time seems to be holding its breath next to streets like neon-lit Kalverstraat, and Red Light ladies strutting by the city's oldest church. Indeed, Amsterdam has as many lovely facets as a 40-carat diamond polished by one of the city's gem cutters. It's certainly a metropolis, but a rather small and very accessible one. Locals tend to refer to it as a big village, albeit one that happens to pack the cultural wallop of a major world destination. There are scores of concerts every day, numerous museums, summertime festivals, and, of course, a legendary year-round party scene. It's pretty much impossible to resist Amsterdam's charms. With 7,000 registered monuments, most of which began as the residences and warehouses of humble merchants, set on 160 man-made canals, and traversed by 1,500 or so bridges, Amsterdam has the largest historical inner city in Europe. Its famous circle of waterways, the grachtengordel, was a 17th-century urban expansion plan for the rich and is a lasting testament to the city’s Golden Age. This town is endearing because of its kinder, gentler nature—but a reputation for championing sex, drugs, and rock ’n’ roll does not alone account for Amsterdam's being one of the most popular destinations in Europe: consider that within a single square mile the city harbors some of the greatest achievements in Western art, from Rembrandt to Van Gogh. Not to mention that this is one of Europe's great walking cities, with so many of its treasures in the untouted details: tiny alleyways barely visible on the map, hidden garden courtyards, shop windows, floating houseboats, hidden hofjes(courtyards with almshouses), sudden vistas of church spires, and gabled roofs that look like so many unframed paintings. And don’t forget that the joy lies in details: elaborate gables and witty gable stones denoting the trade of a previous owner. Keep in mind that those XXX symbols you see all over town are not a mark of the city's triple-X reputation. They're part of Amsterdam's official coat of arms—three St. Andrew's crosses, believed to represent the three dangers that have traditionally plagued the city: flood, fire, and pestilence. The coat's motto ("Valiant, determined, compassionate") was introduced in 1947 by Queen Wilhelmina in remembrance of the 1941 February Strike in Amsterdam—the first time in Europe that non-Jewish people protested against the persecution of Jews by the Nazi regime.

Le Havre, founded by King Francis I of France in 1517, is located inUpper Normandy on the north bank of the mouth of the River Seine, which isconsidered the most frequented waterway in the world. Its port is ranked thesecond largest in France. The city was originally built on marshland andmudflats that were drained in the 1500’s. During WWII most of Le Havre wasdestroyed by Allied bombing raids. Post war rebuilding of the city followed thedevelopment plans of the well-known Belgian architect Auguste Perre. Thereconstruction was so unique that the entire city was listed as a UNESCO WorldHeritage Site in 2005. 

Day 4At sea

Time in Bilbao (Bilbo, in Euskera) may be recorded as BG or AG (Before Guggenheim or After Guggenheim). Never has a single monument of art and architecture so radically changed a city. Frank Gehry's stunning museum, Norman Foster's sleek subway system, the Santiago Calatrava glass footbridge and airport, the leafy César Pelli Abandoibarra park and commercial complex next to the Guggenheim, and the Philippe Starck AlhóndigaBilbao cultural center have contributed to an unprecedented cultural revolution in what was once the industry capital of the Basque Country.Greater Bilbao contains almost 1 million inhabitants, nearly half the total population of the Basque Country. Founded in 1300 by Vizcayan noble Diego López de Haro, Bilbao became an industrial center in the mid-19th century, largely because of the abundance of minerals in the surrounding hills. An affluent industrial class grew up here, as did the working class in suburbs that line the Margen Izquierda (Left Bank) of the Nervión estuary.Bilbao's new attractions get more press, but the city's old treasures still quietly line the banks of the rust-color Nervión River. The Casco Viejo (Old Quarter)—also known as Siete Calles (Seven Streets)—is a charming jumble of shops, bars, and restaurants on the river's Right Bank, near the Puente del Arenal bridge. This elegant proto-Bilbao nucleus was carefully restored after devastating floods in 1983. Throughout the Casco Viejo are ancient mansions emblazoned with family coats of arms, wooden doors, and fine ironwork balconies. The most interesting square is the 64-arch Plaza Nueva, where an outdoor market is pitched every Sunday morning.Walking the banks of the Nervión is a satisfying jaunt. After all, this was how—while out on a morning jog—Guggenheim director Thomas Krens first discovered the perfect spot for his project, nearly opposite the right bank's Deusto University. From the Palacio de Euskalduna upstream to the colossal Mercado de la Ribera, parks and green zones line the river. César Pelli's Abandoibarra project fills in the half mile between the Guggenheim and the Euskalduna bridge with a series of parks, the Deusto University library, the Meliá Bilbao Hotel, and a major shopping center.On the left bank, the wide, late-19th-century boulevards of the Ensanche neighborhood, such as Gran Vía (the main shopping artery) and Alameda de Mazarredo, are the city's more formal face. Bilbao's cultural institutions include, along with the Guggenheim, a major museum of fine arts (the Museo de Bellas Artes) and an opera society (Asociación Bilbaína de Amigos de la Ópera, or ABAO) with 7,000 members from Spain and southern France. In addition, epicureans have long ranked Bilbao's culinary offerings among the best in Spain. Don't miss a chance to ride the trolley line, the Euskotram, for a trip along the river from Atxuri Station to Basurto's San Mamés soccer stadium, reverently dubbed "la Catedral del Fútbol" (the Cathedral of Football).

Nighttime view of Bilbao, Spain

Time in Bilbao (Bilbo, in Euskera) may be recorded as BG or AG (Before Guggenheim or After Guggenheim). Never has a single monument of art and architecture so radically changed a city. Frank Gehry's stunning museum, Norman Foster's sleek subway system, the Santiago Calatrava glass footbridge and airport, the leafy César Pelli Abandoibarra park and commercial complex next to the Guggenheim, and the Philippe Starck AlhóndigaBilbao cultural center have contributed to an unprecedented cultural revolution in what was once the industry capital of the Basque Country.Greater Bilbao contains almost 1 million inhabitants, nearly half the total population of the Basque Country. Founded in 1300 by Vizcayan noble Diego López de Haro, Bilbao became an industrial center in the mid-19th century, largely because of the abundance of minerals in the surrounding hills. An affluent industrial class grew up here, as did the working class in suburbs that line the Margen Izquierda (Left Bank) of the Nervión estuary.Bilbao's new attractions get more press, but the city's old treasures still quietly line the banks of the rust-color Nervión River. The Casco Viejo (Old Quarter)—also known as Siete Calles (Seven Streets)—is a charming jumble of shops, bars, and restaurants on the river's Right Bank, near the Puente del Arenal bridge. This elegant proto-Bilbao nucleus was carefully restored after devastating floods in 1983. Throughout the Casco Viejo are ancient mansions emblazoned with family coats of arms, wooden doors, and fine ironwork balconies. The most interesting square is the 64-arch Plaza Nueva, where an outdoor market is pitched every Sunday morning.Walking the banks of the Nervión is a satisfying jaunt. After all, this was how—while out on a morning jog—Guggenheim director Thomas Krens first discovered the perfect spot for his project, nearly opposite the right bank's Deusto University. From the Palacio de Euskalduna upstream to the colossal Mercado de la Ribera, parks and green zones line the river. César Pelli's Abandoibarra project fills in the half mile between the Guggenheim and the Euskalduna bridge with a series of parks, the Deusto University library, the Meliá Bilbao Hotel, and a major shopping center.On the left bank, the wide, late-19th-century boulevards of the Ensanche neighborhood, such as Gran Vía (the main shopping artery) and Alameda de Mazarredo, are the city's more formal face. Bilbao's cultural institutions include, along with the Guggenheim, a major museum of fine arts (the Museo de Bellas Artes) and an opera society (Asociación Bilbaína de Amigos de la Ópera, or ABAO) with 7,000 members from Spain and southern France. In addition, epicureans have long ranked Bilbao's culinary offerings among the best in Spain. Don't miss a chance to ride the trolley line, the Euskotram, for a trip along the river from Atxuri Station to Basurto's San Mamés soccer stadium, reverently dubbed "la Catedral del Fútbol" (the Cathedral of Football).

Nighttime view of Bilbao, Spain

Day 7At sea

Set on seven hills on the banks of the River Tagus, Lisbon has been the capital of Portugal since the 13th century. It is a city famous for its majestic architecture, old wooden trams, Moorish features and more than twenty centuries of history. Following disastrous earthquakes in the 18th century, Lisbon was rebuilt by the Marques de Pombal who created an elegant city with wide boulevards and a great riverfront and square, Praça do Comércio. Today there are distinct modern and ancient sections, combining great shopping with culture and sightseeing in the Old Town, built on the city's terraced hillsides. The distance between the ship and your tour vehicle may vary. This distance is not included in the excursion grades.

The city of Lisbon, Portugal

Believed to be the oldest town on the Iberian Peninsula, the Andalusian port of Cádiz enjoys a stunning location at the edge of a six-mile promontory. The town itself, with 3,000 years of history, is characterised by pretty white houses with balconies often adorned with colourful flowers. As you wander around be sure to take a stroll through the sizeable Plaza de Espãna, with its large monument dedicated to the first Spanish constitution, which was signed here in 1812. Cádiz has two pleasant seafront promenades which boast fine views of the Atlantic Ocean, and has a lovely park, the Parque Genoves, located close to the sea with an open-air theatre and attractive palm garden. Also notable is the neo-Classical cathedral, capped by a golden dome.

Málaga is the gateway to the Andalusian countryside and the Costa del Sol, some of the region’s most impressive beaches. It also is home to a number of magnificent palaces, including the Moorish Alcabaza and Gibralfaro.

Cartagena's magnificent city walls and fortresses, now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, enclose a well-restored historic center (the Cuidad Amurallada, or walled city) with plazas, churches, museums, and shops that have made it a lively coastal vacation spot for South Americans and others. New hotels and restaurants make the walled city a desirable place to stay, and the formerly down-at-the-heels Getsemaní neighborhood attracts those seeking a bohemian buzz. The historic center is a small section of Cartagena; many hotels are in the Bocagrande district, an elongated peninsula where high-rise hotels overlook a long, gray-sand beach.When it was founded in 1533 by Spanish conquistador Pedro de Heredia, Cartagena was the only port on the South American mainland. Gold and silver looted from indigenous peoples passed through here en route to Spain and attracted pirates, including Sir Francis Drake, who in 1586 torched 200 buildings. Cartagena's walls protected the city's riches as well as the New World's most important African slave market.

Day 12At sea

Civitavecchia is the cruise gateway to Rome. Italy's vibrant capital lives in the present, but no other city on earth evokes its past so powerfully. For over 2,500 years, emperors, popes, artists, and common citizens have left their mark here. Archaeological remains from ancient Rome, art-stuffed churches, and the treasures of Vatican City vie for your attention, but Rome is also a wonderful place to practice the Italian-perfected il dolce far niente, the sweet art of idleness. Your most memorable experiences may include sitting at a caffè in the Campo de' Fiori or strolling in a beguiling piazza.

The ship Celebrity Reflection

The newest ship in the fleet, Celebrity Reflection offers the finest Solstice Class features and amenities to create a relaxing, premium cruise experience

Capacity
3030
Cabins
1523
Total crew
1293
Length
1047m

Food and drink

Offering a variety of seating options. Passengers can chose from traditional, set table seating at 6pm or 8.30pm, or Celebrity Select - the choice to dine any time between 6.30pm – 9pm. Advanced bookings are available∘ as is the option to show up when you like.

Tuscan Grille

Vibrant and flavoursome – just two of the words used to describe Tuscan Grille. In both the menu and the ambience, the... Read more

Cover
Italian

Qsine

Cool, contemporary and a little offbeat, the trailblazing Qsine offers a culinary adventure with a Uniquely Unordinary edge designed to surprise and... Read more

Cover
Fusion

Main Dining

Right at the heart of the Celebrity Cruises dining experience is the grand main dining room. Eat, drink, laugh and take your... Read more

Complimentary
Classic

24-hour Room Service

Enjoy Celebrity’s delectable dining delivered right to your stateroom or suite, complimentary and at any time.
Complimentary in-stateroom dining.
Tired from a day of... Read more

Complimentary
Room

Murano

As timeless as it is modern, the sophisticated ambience of Murano is reflected in the impeccable service and accomplished contemporary take on... Read more

Cover
French

The Lawn Club

Indulge in a day of luxurious relaxation as you unwind in your own private, cabana-styled haven on The Lawn Club.

The chic Alcoves... Read more

Cover
Varies

The Lawn Club Grill

Enjoy hands-on outdoor grilling with ocean views in an open air setting overlooking The Lawn Club.
The bright, modern environment of The Lawn... Read more

Cover
Bbq

Casual Dining

Oceanview Café
The Oceanview Café reflects the fantastic choice and value of an international marketplace. Help yourself and take a voyage around the... Read more

Complimentary
Cafe

Entertainment

A mixture of contemporary, classic and innovative forms of entertainment can be found onboard. Classic entertainment∘ options include a two-deck library, art gallery, cinema, card room, quizzes and trivia contests. Pool volleyball, lawn games and video games are also on offer.

Library

With over 2,000 books on subjects ranging from classic to popular biographies, history to contemporary mysteries. A selection of 1,000 DVDs and... Read more

Celebrity iLounge

This is Celebrity's chic, new approach to the Internet lounge that's also the first Authorised Apple Reseller at Sea. It's the modern... Read more

Theatre

The Main Theatre is the place to sit back and be entertained – our talented Celebrity Cruises entertainment team will dazzle you... Read more

Art Gallery

Refined culture at sea is what you will experience in Celebrity's inspiring and thought-provoking Art Gallery. Stop in on your way to... Read more

Fortunes Casino

Feeling lucky? Combining the ambience of Monte Carlo and the energy of Las Vegas, Fortunes Casino is a perfect spot to participate... Read more

Passport Bar

Relaxing and inviting, its position right off the Grand Foyer means this may be the first, but not the last, place you... Read more

Health and fitness

Whether you want to clear your mind, fine-tune your body, reinvigorate your spirit – or all of the above – The Spa is an indulgent escape where you can do it all. The Spa introduced an array of innovative new firsts in beauty, fitness and wellness that make finding complete bliss on holiday easier than ever. 

The Spa

Begin your spa journey by selecting from more than 120 treatments for a spa experience unlike anything else at sea. Discover ground-breaking... Read more

Fitness Centre

In the fitness centre you can meet with a personal trainer, take a fitness class, try our resistance swimming pool or challenge... Read more

Persian Garden

Accompanied by the calming strains of new age music, enjoy the warmth of a relaxing steam or treat your skin to the... Read more

Solarium

Find true poolside serenity at the Solarium. Featuring a gorgeous pool, sparkling waterfalls, thickly padded lounge chairs, and an adults-only policy, tranquility... Read more

Sports

Practise skills on your own, play with old or new friends, or take part in a tournament with one of the Celebrity... Read more

Kids and teens

Celebrity Cruises offer many unique family-friendly activities, as well as more traditional children’s clubs. Designed for children of all ages and interests, each program is geared towards a specific age group and supervised∘ by an experienced youth staff member.

Largest Xbox Experience at Sea

Dedicated Xbox stations and mobile consoles. Solo, tournament and theme nights for kids, teens and adults. The latest releases, all free to... Read more

iTake

Video project just for teens. From story boarding to filming and editing, prizes are awarded for numerous film category winners at the... Read more

Fun Factory & Ship Mates

Designed exclusively for junior cruisers, Fun Factory is a place where magic happens. Children age 3-11 will thrive in this environment, which... Read more

XClub

Younger cruisers ages 12-17 can cut loose and kick back the way they want in our hip VIP area geared specifically for... Read more

Enrichment

In association with Rosetta Stone and Apple, Celebrity offers an impressive range of educational activities and guest speakers during most of their sailings. Learn how to dance, brush up on your language skills, or take in a unique hot glass show - the first at sea.

Useful info

Disabled Facilities

You may bring and use wheelchairs, mobility scooters and other assistive devices onboard our ships. Due to safety regulations, Segways may not... Read more

Special Dietary Requirements

Celebrity Cruises makes every effort to accommodate guest’s dietary requirements wherever possible. Most dietary needs can be catered for such as:
Vegetarian, Gluten... Read more

Age Restrictions

Drinking: The minimum drinking age for all alcoholic beverages on all Celebrity Cruises ships is 21 years of age.
However, on ships sailing from... Read more

Dress Code

A Celebrity cruise is a step into luxury, so it’s the perfect opportunity to dress up for dining every evening.
Whether enjoying... Read more

WiFi Access

All Celebrity Millennium® and Celebrity Solstice® Class ships are fully wireless and also have an internet area. Celebrity Xpedition has dial up... Read more

Environment

Lighting

We’re replacing higher wattage halogen and incandescent light bulbs with longer lasting fluorescent and Light Emitting Diode (LED) lights throughout our fleet.... Read more

Sailing
Cabin
Details
Payment

Choose a sailing to book

Interior
Window
Balcony
Suite
Book with confidence

We know these are uncertain times, but don't fret. All bookings are covered by our Financial Protection Guarantee and we only work with cruise lines that are members of ATOL and ABTA. For more information about cancellation cover, visit the Coronavirus Cancellation Policies page.

How many people will be travelling?


* Passengers should be aged under 18 at the time of embarkation to qualify as a child.
Prices shown are per person based on two people sharing (unless otherwise specfied) in GBP and subject to availability. Certain restrictions can apply. Prices are updated on a daily basis and may vary when continuing through the booking process.