Holland America Line

21-night Norse Legends & Jewels Of The Baltic

Nieuw Statendam

Launched December 2018, Nieuw Statendam carries forward the nautical heritage, signature service and classic style for which Holland America Line is known—while raising the bar for 21st-century elegance. Sister ship to Koningsdam, she’s the second of our Pinnacle-class ships.

Explore the ship
Itinerary highlights
Amsterdam Netherlands
Molde Norway
Geiranger Norway
Ship highlights
Photo of the Pinnacle Grill Pinnacle Grill
Photo of the Explorations Central Explorations Central
Photo of the BLEND BLEND
from
£3,069
per person
from
£146
per night
Free cancellation up to 30 days before you sail through 31 Dec 2021
2 May 2021
£3,309 £3,069
2 May 2021
£4,099 £3,939
2 May 2021
£4,409 £3,939
2 May 2021
£6,039 £5,589
Book from £3,069 Email me this cruise

Book with Confidence

Cancel your cruise for free up to 30 days before your sail date and get a future cruise credit in the amount of non-refundable fees (the remainder will be refunded to you), valid until 31 December 2021.

Find out more

The itinerary

Amsterdam combines the unrivaled beauty of the 17th-century Golden Age city center with plenty of museums and art of the highest order, not to mention a remarkably laid-back atmosphere. It all comes together to make this one of the world's most appealing and offbeat metropolises in the world. Built on a latticework of concentric canals like an aquatic rainbow, Amsterdam is known as the City of Canals—but it's no Venice, content to live on moonlight serenades and former glory. Quite the contrary: on nearly every street here you'll find old and new side by side—quiet corners where time seems to be holding its breath next to streets like neon-lit Kalverstraat, and Red Light ladies strutting by the city's oldest church. Indeed, Amsterdam has as many lovely facets as a 40-carat diamond polished by one of the city's gem cutters. It's certainly a metropolis, but a rather small and very accessible one. Locals tend to refer to it as a big village, albeit one that happens to pack the cultural wallop of a major world destination. There are scores of concerts every day, numerous museums, summertime festivals, and, of course, a legendary year-round party scene. It's pretty much impossible to resist Amsterdam's charms. With 7,000 registered monuments, most of which began as the residences and warehouses of humble merchants, set on 160 man-made canals, and traversed by 1,500 or so bridges, Amsterdam has the largest historical inner city in Europe. Its famous circle of waterways, the grachtengordel, was a 17th-century urban expansion plan for the rich and is a lasting testament to the city’s Golden Age. This town is endearing because of its kinder, gentler nature—but a reputation for championing sex, drugs, and rock ’n’ roll does not alone account for Amsterdam's being one of the most popular destinations in Europe: consider that within a single square mile the city harbors some of the greatest achievements in Western art, from Rembrandt to Van Gogh. Not to mention that this is one of Europe's great walking cities, with so many of its treasures in the untouted details: tiny alleyways barely visible on the map, hidden garden courtyards, shop windows, floating houseboats, hidden hofjes(courtyards with almshouses), sudden vistas of church spires, and gabled roofs that look like so many unframed paintings. And don’t forget that the joy lies in details: elaborate gables and witty gable stones denoting the trade of a previous owner. Keep in mind that those XXX symbols you see all over town are not a mark of the city's triple-X reputation. They're part of Amsterdam's official coat of arms—three St. Andrew's crosses, believed to represent the three dangers that have traditionally plagued the city: flood, fire, and pestilence. The coat's motto ("Valiant, determined, compassionate") was introduced in 1947 by Queen Wilhelmina in remembrance of the 1941 February Strike in Amsterdam—the first time in Europe that non-Jewish people protested against the persecution of Jews by the Nazi regime.

Day 2At Sea

Day 3Scenic cruising Hardangerfjord

Molde, the 'Town of Roses', is a city and municipality in Romsdal in Møre og Romsdal County, Norway. The municipality is located on the Romsdal Peninsula, surrounding the Fannefjord and Moldefjord. The city is located on the northern shore of the Romsdalsfjord. The city of Molde is the administrative centre of Møre og Romsdal County, administrative center of the municipality of Molde, commercial hub of the Romsdal region and seat of the Diocese of Møre. Molde proper consists of a 6.2-mile (10-kilometre) long and 0.62-1.24 mile (1-2-kilometre) wide strip of urban land running east-west along the north shore of the Moldefjord, an arm of the Romsdalsfjord, on the Romsdal Peninsula. The city is sheltered by Bolsøya and the Molde Archipelago, a chain of low-lying islands and islets, to the south and the wood-clad hills of Moldemarka to the north. The city centre is located just west of the River Moldeelva, which runs into the city from the north, originating in the Lake Moldevatnet and running through the Valley Moldedalen.

The Geirangerfjord, which made the UNESCO World Heritage List in 2005, is Norway's most spectacular and perhaps best-known fjord. The 16-km-long (10-mile-long), 960-foot-deep Geirangerfjord's most stunning attractions are its roaring waterfalls—the Seven Sisters, the Bridal Veil, and the Suitor. Perched on mountain ledges along the fjord, deserted farms at Skageflå and Knivsflå are being restored and maintained by local enthusiasts.The village of Geiranger, at the end of the fjord, is home to fewer than 300 year-round residents, but in spring and summer its population swells to 5,000 due to visitors traveling from Hellesylt to the east. In winter, snow on the mountain roads often makes the village isolated.

Surrounded by mountains and sparkling fjords, the waterside city of Bergen has a spectacular setting. There has been a settlement here since medieval times and the colourful waterfront buildings of the Hanseatic wharf, known as Bryggen, are testament to its fascinating history of trade. As Norway’s best known medieval settlement, the Bryggen is listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site. Our comprehensive selection of excursions allows you to discover the many sides of Bergen, such as the fish market and narrow cobbled streets, as well as stunning views of the city from the summit of Mt Fløyen. Alternatively, those who have visited the city previously may like to experience one of the tours that travel further afield. Just 300 yards from the main piers, you will find the Fortress Museum (Fesningsmuseum), which has an interesting collection of objects related to World War II.

Day 7At Sea

Amsterdam combines the unrivaled beauty of the 17th-century Golden Age city center with plenty of museums and art of the highest order, not to mention a remarkably laid-back atmosphere. It all comes together to make this one of the world's most appealing and offbeat metropolises in the world. Built on a latticework of concentric canals like an aquatic rainbow, Amsterdam is known as the City of Canals—but it's no Venice, content to live on moonlight serenades and former glory. Quite the contrary: on nearly every street here you'll find old and new side by side—quiet corners where time seems to be holding its breath next to streets like neon-lit Kalverstraat, and Red Light ladies strutting by the city's oldest church. Indeed, Amsterdam has as many lovely facets as a 40-carat diamond polished by one of the city's gem cutters. It's certainly a metropolis, but a rather small and very accessible one. Locals tend to refer to it as a big village, albeit one that happens to pack the cultural wallop of a major world destination. There are scores of concerts every day, numerous museums, summertime festivals, and, of course, a legendary year-round party scene. It's pretty much impossible to resist Amsterdam's charms. With 7,000 registered monuments, most of which began as the residences and warehouses of humble merchants, set on 160 man-made canals, and traversed by 1,500 or so bridges, Amsterdam has the largest historical inner city in Europe. Its famous circle of waterways, the grachtengordel, was a 17th-century urban expansion plan for the rich and is a lasting testament to the city’s Golden Age. This town is endearing because of its kinder, gentler nature—but a reputation for championing sex, drugs, and rock ’n’ roll does not alone account for Amsterdam's being one of the most popular destinations in Europe: consider that within a single square mile the city harbors some of the greatest achievements in Western art, from Rembrandt to Van Gogh. Not to mention that this is one of Europe's great walking cities, with so many of its treasures in the untouted details: tiny alleyways barely visible on the map, hidden garden courtyards, shop windows, floating houseboats, hidden hofjes(courtyards with almshouses), sudden vistas of church spires, and gabled roofs that look like so many unframed paintings. And don’t forget that the joy lies in details: elaborate gables and witty gable stones denoting the trade of a previous owner. Keep in mind that those XXX symbols you see all over town are not a mark of the city's triple-X reputation. They're part of Amsterdam's official coat of arms—three St. Andrew's crosses, believed to represent the three dangers that have traditionally plagued the city: flood, fire, and pestilence. The coat's motto ("Valiant, determined, compassionate") was introduced in 1947 by Queen Wilhelmina in remembrance of the 1941 February Strike in Amsterdam—the first time in Europe that non-Jewish people protested against the persecution of Jews by the Nazi regime.

Day 9At Sea

Århus is Denmark's second-largest city, and, with its funky arts and college community, one of the country's most pleasant. Cutting through the center of town is a canal called the Århus Å (Århus Creek). It used to run underground, but was uncovered a few years ago. Since then, an amalgam of bars, cafés, and restaurants has sprouted along its banks. At all hours of the day and night this waterfront strip is abuzz with crowds that hang out on the outdoor terraces and steps that lead down to the creek.The VisitÅrhus tourist office has information about the Århus Passport, which includes passage on buses, free or discounted admission to the 12 most popular museums and sites in the city, and tours.

Warnemünde, officially a suburb of Rostock, is a quaint seaside resort town with the best hotels and restaurants in the area, as well as 20 km (12 miles) of beautiful white-sand beach. It's been a popular summer getaway for families in eastern Germany for years.There is little to do in Warnemünde except relax, and the town excels brilliantly at that. However, Warnemünde is a major cruise-ship terminal. Whenever there is more than one ship at dock, the town explodes with a county fair–like atmosphere, and shops and restaurants stay open until the ships leave at midnight. The city celebrates the dreifache Anlauf, when three ships dock simultaneously, with fireworks.

Warnemünde, Rostock in Germany

Day 12At Sea

Estonia's history is sprinkled liberally with long stretches of foreign domination, beginning in 1219 with the Danes, followed without interruption by the Germans, Swedes, and Russians. Only after World War I, with Russia in revolutionary wreckage, was Estonia able to declare its independence. Shortly before World War II, in 1940, that independence was usurped by the Soviets, who—save for a brief three-year occupation by Hitler's Nazis—proceeded to suppress all forms of national Estonian pride for the next 50 years. Estonia finally regained independence in 1991. In the early 1990s, Estonia's own Riigikogu (Parliament), not some other nation's puppet ruler, handed down from the Upper City reforms that forced Estonia to blaze its post-Soviet trail to the European Union. Estonia has been a member of the EU since 2004, and in 2011, the country and its growing economy joined the Eurozone. Tallinn was also named the European City of Culture in 2011, cementing its growing reputation as a cultural hot spot.

Commissioned by Tsar Peter the Great (1672–1725) as "a window looking into Europe," St. Petersburg is a planned city whose elegance is reminiscent of Europe's most alluring capitals. Little wonder it's the darling of fashion photographers and travel essayists today: built on more than a hundred islands in the Neva Delta linked by canals and arched bridges, it was called the "Venice of the North" by Goethe, and its stately embankments are reminiscent of those in Paris. A city of golden spires and gilded domes, of pastel palaces and candlelit cathedrals, this city conceived by a visionary emperor is filled with pleasures and tantalizing treasures. With its strict geometric lines and perfectly planned architecture, so unlike the Russian cities that came before it, St. Petersburg is almost too European to be Russian. And yet it's too Russian to be European. The city is a powerful combination of both East and West, springing from the will and passion of its founder to guide a resistant Russia into the greater fold of Europe, and consequently into the mainstream of history. That he accomplished, and more. With a population of nearly 5 million, St. Petersburg is the fourth largest city in Europe after Paris, Moscow, and London. Without as many of the fashionably modern buildings that a business center like Moscow acquires, the city has managed to preserve much more of its history. Here, you can imagine yourself back in the time of the tsars and Dostoyevsky. Although it's a close race, it's safe to say that most visitors prefer St. Petersburg's culture, history, and beauty to Moscow's glamour and power. That said, St. Petersburg has begun to play a more active role in politics in recent years, as if it were the country's northern capital. St. Petersburg revels in its historic beauty but also embraces the new.

Commissioned by Tsar Peter the Great (1672–1725) as "a window looking into Europe," St. Petersburg is a planned city whose elegance is reminiscent of Europe's most alluring capitals. Little wonder it's the darling of fashion photographers and travel essayists today: built on more than a hundred islands in the Neva Delta linked by canals and arched bridges, it was called the "Venice of the North" by Goethe, and its stately embankments are reminiscent of those in Paris. A city of golden spires and gilded domes, of pastel palaces and candlelit cathedrals, this city conceived by a visionary emperor is filled with pleasures and tantalizing treasures. With its strict geometric lines and perfectly planned architecture, so unlike the Russian cities that came before it, St. Petersburg is almost too European to be Russian. And yet it's too Russian to be European. The city is a powerful combination of both East and West, springing from the will and passion of its founder to guide a resistant Russia into the greater fold of Europe, and consequently into the mainstream of history. That he accomplished, and more. With a population of nearly 5 million, St. Petersburg is the fourth largest city in Europe after Paris, Moscow, and London. Without as many of the fashionably modern buildings that a business center like Moscow acquires, the city has managed to preserve much more of its history. Here, you can imagine yourself back in the time of the tsars and Dostoyevsky. Although it's a close race, it's safe to say that most visitors prefer St. Petersburg's culture, history, and beauty to Moscow's glamour and power. That said, St. Petersburg has begun to play a more active role in politics in recent years, as if it were the country's northern capital. St. Petersburg revels in its historic beauty but also embraces the new.

A city of the sea, Helsinki was built along a series of oddly shaped peninsulas and islands jutting into the Baltic coast along the Gulf of Finland. Streets and avenues curve around bays, bridges reach to nearby islands, and ferries ply among offshore islands.Having grown dramatically since World War II, Helsinki now absorbs more than one-tenth of the Finnish population. The metro area covers 764 square km (474 square miles) and 315 islands. Most sights, hotels, and restaurants cluster on one peninsula, forming a compact central hub. The greater Helsinki metropolitan area, which includes Espoo and Vantaa, has a total population of more than a million people.Helsinki is a relatively young city compared with other European capitals. In the 16th century, King Gustav Vasa of Sweden decided to woo trade from the Estonian city of Tallinn and thus challenge the Hanseatic League's monopoly on Baltic trade. Accordingly, he commanded the people of four Finnish towns to pack up their belongings and relocate to the rapids on the River Vantaa. The new town, founded on June 12, 1550, was named Helsinki.For three centuries, Helsinki (Helsingfors in Swedish) had its ups and downs as a trading town. Turku, to the west, remained Finland's capital and intellectual center. However, Helsinki's fortunes improved when Finland fell under Russian rule as an autonomous grand duchy. Czar Alexander I wanted Finland's political center closer to Russia and, in 1812, selected Helsinki as the new capital. Shortly afterward, Turku suffered a disastrous fire, forcing the university to move to Helsinki. The town's future was secure.Just before the czar's proclamation, a fire destroyed many of Helsinki's traditional wooden structures, precipitating the construction of new buildings suitable for a nation's capital. The German-born architect Carl Ludvig Engel was commissioned to rebuild the city, and as a result, Helsinki has some of the purest neoclassical architecture in the world. Add to this foundation the influence of Stockholm and St. Petersburg with the local inspiration of 20th-century Finnish design, and the result is a European capital city that is as architecturally eye-catching as it is distinct from other Scandinavian capitals. You are bound to discover endless engaging details—a grimacing gargoyle; a foursome of males supporting a balcony's weight on their shoulders; a building painted in striking colors with contrasting flowers in the windows. The city's 400 or so parks make it particularly inviting in summer.Today, Helsinki is still a meeting point of eastern and western Europe, which is reflected in its cosmopolitan image, the influx of Russians and Estonians, and generally multilingual population. Outdoor summer bars ("terrassit" as the locals call them) and cafés in the city center are perfect for people watching on a summer afternoon.

Day 17Cruising Stockholm Archipelago

Stockholm is a city in the flush of its second youth. Since the mid-1990s, Sweden's capital has emerged from its cold, Nordic shadow to take the stage as a truly international city. What started with entry into the European Union in 1995 gained pace with the extraordinary IT boom of the late 1990s, strengthened with the Skype-led IT second wave of 2003, and solidified with the hedge-fund invasion that is still happening today as Stockholm gains even more global confidence. And despite more recent economic turmoil, Stockholm's 1 million or so inhabitants have, almost as one, realized that their city is one to rival Paris, London, New York, or any other great metropolis.With this realization comes change. Stockholm has become a city of design, fashion, innovation, technology, and world-class food, pairing homegrown talent with an international outlook. The streets are flowing with a young and confident population keen to drink in everything the city has to offer. The glittering feeling of optimism, success, and living in the here and now is rampant in Stockholm.Stockholm also has plenty of history. Positioned where the waters of Lake Mälaren rush into the Baltic, it’s been an important trading site and a wealthy international city for centuries. Built on 14 islands joined by bridges crossing open bays and narrow channels, Stockholm boasts the story of its history in its glorious medieval old town, grand palaces, ancient churches, sturdy edifices, public parks, and 19th-century museums—its history is soaked into the very fabric of its airy boulevards, built as a public display of trading glory.

Day 18At Sea

Known for the Kiel Canal and Kiel Week, the city boasts an important maritime history. Kiel is also a great place to sight-see, do some shopping and take part in one of the many festivals taking place there.

Copenhagen is the largest city in Scandinavia and the capital of Denmark. The city is regularly named one of the best cities to visit and live in the world. Some of its famous attractions including the Gefion Fountain and Amalienborg Palace, take a river boat along the city’s waterways, visit Rosenborg Castle or explore the medieval fishing village of Dragoer. Once the home of Hans Christian Andersen, Copenhagen features many reminders of its fairytale heritage, the most famous being The Little Mermaid statue on the Langelinie promenade. Copenhagen has three cruise terminals, most large ships dock in Ocean Quay, which is located around two miles outside of the city centre.

Nyhavn 17, Copenhagen

Day 21At Sea

Amsterdam combines the unrivaled beauty of the 17th-century Golden Age city center with plenty of museums and art of the highest order, not to mention a remarkably laid-back atmosphere. It all comes together to make this one of the world's most appealing and offbeat metropolises in the world. Built on a latticework of concentric canals like an aquatic rainbow, Amsterdam is known as the City of Canals—but it's no Venice, content to live on moonlight serenades and former glory. Quite the contrary: on nearly every street here you'll find old and new side by side—quiet corners where time seems to be holding its breath next to streets like neon-lit Kalverstraat, and Red Light ladies strutting by the city's oldest church. Indeed, Amsterdam has as many lovely facets as a 40-carat diamond polished by one of the city's gem cutters. It's certainly a metropolis, but a rather small and very accessible one. Locals tend to refer to it as a big village, albeit one that happens to pack the cultural wallop of a major world destination. There are scores of concerts every day, numerous museums, summertime festivals, and, of course, a legendary year-round party scene. It's pretty much impossible to resist Amsterdam's charms. With 7,000 registered monuments, most of which began as the residences and warehouses of humble merchants, set on 160 man-made canals, and traversed by 1,500 or so bridges, Amsterdam has the largest historical inner city in Europe. Its famous circle of waterways, the grachtengordel, was a 17th-century urban expansion plan for the rich and is a lasting testament to the city’s Golden Age. This town is endearing because of its kinder, gentler nature—but a reputation for championing sex, drugs, and rock ’n’ roll does not alone account for Amsterdam's being one of the most popular destinations in Europe: consider that within a single square mile the city harbors some of the greatest achievements in Western art, from Rembrandt to Van Gogh. Not to mention that this is one of Europe's great walking cities, with so many of its treasures in the untouted details: tiny alleyways barely visible on the map, hidden garden courtyards, shop windows, floating houseboats, hidden hofjes(courtyards with almshouses), sudden vistas of church spires, and gabled roofs that look like so many unframed paintings. And don’t forget that the joy lies in details: elaborate gables and witty gable stones denoting the trade of a previous owner. Keep in mind that those XXX symbols you see all over town are not a mark of the city's triple-X reputation. They're part of Amsterdam's official coat of arms—three St. Andrew's crosses, believed to represent the three dangers that have traditionally plagued the city: flood, fire, and pestilence. The coat's motto ("Valiant, determined, compassionate") was introduced in 1947 by Queen Wilhelmina in remembrance of the 1941 February Strike in Amsterdam—the first time in Europe that non-Jewish people protested against the persecution of Jews by the Nazi regime.

The ship Nieuw Statendam

Launched December 2018, Nieuw Statendam carries forward the nautical heritage, signature service and classic style for which Holland America Line is known—while raising the bar for 21st-century elegance. Sister ship to Koningsdam, she’s the second of our Pinnacle-class ships.

Capacity
2650
Total crew
1025
Length
975m

Food and drink

Grab one of our signature burgers by the pool at Dive-In, choose sophisticated ambiance in our elegant dining room, spend a romantic evening in the Pinnacle Grill or enjoy in-room dining any time of day. 

Rudi's Sel de Mer

Sel de Mer ("sea salt," in French) is an intimate seafood brasserie offering a contemporary twist on French seafood classics, with à... Read more

Cover
French

Canaletto

This authentic Italian restaurants offers a menu that celebrates spartire (Italian for "sharing"). Try Braised Chicken Cacciatore "al Forno," Branzino ai Ferri... Read more

Cover
Italian

Tamarind

Tamarind delights with exotic menus evoking the culinary traditions of Southeast Asia, China and Japan. Menus created by Master Chef Rudi Sodamin... Read more

Cover
Asian

Pinnacle Grill

Enjoy dishes inspired by America’s Pacific Northwest, such as king salmon from Alaska and choice, responsibly raised beef from Washington State’s Double... Read more

Cover
American

The Dining Room

For an elegant breakfast, leisurely lunch or unforgettable multi-course dinner, The Dining Room is your destination. Behind the scenes, our Culinary Council,®... Read more

Complimentary
Varies

Lido Market

Lido Market provides a fresh, new approach to casual dining for breakfast, lunch or dinner, with a panoramic view of the sea.... Read more

Complimentary
Buffet

Dive-In

Dive in to a grilled burger on brioche or a Nathan’s Famous gourmet hot dog. For alfresco dining by the pool, Dive-In... Read more

Complimentary
American

New York Pizza & Deli

Served up poolside: crisp Italian salads and personal pan pizzas made with a thin crust and a sauce so savory it does... Read more

Complimentary
Pizzeria

Grand Dutch Cafe

Inspired by our Dutch heritage and complemented with blue-and-white Delftware, the Grand Dutch Cafe is the perfect place to enjoy a fine... Read more

Complimentary
Regional

G Gelato

Enjoy this classic European dessert on ms Koningsdam, made fresh on board in a variety of delicious flavors and styles.

Gelato

Entertainment

Dazzling entertainment options abound on board Nieuw Statendam. The new Lincoln Center Stage and Billboard Onboard venues join the already popular B.B. King’s Blues Club for a complete new “Music Walk” experience. 

Onboard activities abound, including intimate tasting and wine-blending classes at BLEND by Chateau Ste. Michelle. 

B.B King's Blues Club

Direct from Beale Street, the B.B. King’s All-Stars Band brings the best of Memphis music to sea. From funky and fast to... Read more

Lincoln Centre Stage

In an exclusive partnership with the world’s leading center for the performing arts, Lincoln Center Stage showcases outstanding live chamber music performances.

Rolling Stone Bar

Guests are part of the show as live musicians rock the crowd with 50 years of chart-topping hits. Between nightly sets, guests... Read more

World Stage

With its two-story, 270-degree wraparound LED screen surrounding you in high-definition, our World Stage is a dazzling, trendsetting theater where innovation meets... Read more

Casino

From perennially popular slot machines and blackjack tables to the latest in sophisticated gaming, the Casino offers games for all levels, staffed... Read more

Movies Poolside

Complimentary films and popcorn are waiting for you in your ship's movie theatre. Movies can also be enjoyed from the comfort of... Read more

Ocean Bar

Enjoy cocktails and ocean views while listening to live string music.

Notes

With its impressive collection of more than 130 labels, Notes, a dedicated whiskey bar on MS Nieuw Statendam, is an aficionado’s paradise.

Gallery Bar

In this unique art-themed bar, order from a menu created by Master Mixologist Dale DeGroff, a 2015 James Beard Who's Who Inductee.

Piano Bar

Gather around and sing along as our pianist plays your favorites.

Tamarind Bar

Partake in exotic cocktails and sakétinis amid wraparound ocean views.

Lido and Seaview Bars

Sip refreshments poolside in shaded seating around the bar or delivered to your sunny chaise lounge.

Crow's Nest

Enjoy cocktails and breathtaking sunsets in this unique lounge, which features sweeping panoramic views.

Explorer's Lounge

Savor refined coffees, drinks and liqueurs to the sounds of Adagio, a classical ensemble.

Mix

Explore a lively mix of three specialty bars — Champagne, Martinis, and Spirits and Ales.

Holland America Shops

Enjoy a wide variety of duty-free shopping in the Signature Shops such as Merabella, a luxury jewelry boutique featuring high-end watches and... Read more

Health and fitness

Whether you want to workout in the Fitness Centre, learn yoga, pamper yourself with a massage and spa treatment, or enjoy a game of basketball, there's a perfect onboard activity for everyone.

Rejuvenate at our Greenhouse Spa, take a Pilates class or simply relax and unwind.

Greenhouse Spa & Salon

During a leisurely day at sea, few places help you refresh, relax and rejuvenate like the Greenhouse Spa & Salon and Fitness... Read more

Fitness Centre

Take a class in our professionally staffed Fitness Center* equipped with the latest cardio and weight machines. On deck are basketball and... Read more

Kids and teens

Club HAL® provides a wide variety of exciting youth and teen-friendly activities for guests ages 3 to 17, supervised by full-time staff with degrees in education, recreation, childhood development or related fields.

Kids ages 3–7: Younger cruisers enjoy activities such as pirate treasure hunts, ice cream parties, storytelling and “Little Artists” crafts.

'Tweens ages 8 –12: 'Tweens can take part in video game tournaments, relay races, karaoke dance parties and more.

Teens ages 13–17: Enjoy mocktail mixology classes, late night sporting competitions, hip hop classes, guys verses girls scavenger hunts, tech classes and teen-only night club events. 

Enrichment

Boasting an expansive range of enrichment facilities and opportunity, Holland America Line's ships are bound to offer something you'll want to know more about. 


Explorations Central

Explorations Central™ (EXC®), Holland America Line’s exclusive destination programming, is designed to deepen your understanding of the places you visit. Its indispensable... Read more

BLEND

Wine connoisseurs and novices alike can experience the art of winemaking at BLEND by Chateau Ste. Michelle, Washington State’s oldest and most... Read more

BBC Earth Experiences

We have partnered with BBC Earth to bring you unforgettable new ways to experience the world's natural wonders. Through the innovative and... Read more

Port To Table

Each voyage brings a guest chef on board to guide you through the culinary traditions of your destinations. Try local flavors at... Read more

EXC Culture

Join us for entertaining performances that reflect the cultures and traditions of the destinations you visit. From elaborate stage shows highlighting Tahitian... Read more

O, The Oprah Magazine Partnership

Holland America Line has partnered with O, The Oprah Magazine to combine the eye-opening, life-changing wonder of travel with the soul-expanding content... Read more

Useful info

Disabled Facilities

Service Animals

Holland America Line only permits service animals onboard, defined as those animals that are individually trained to provide assistance to an... Read more

Special Dietary Requirements

For guests with food intolerances or allergies that are not life-threatening, please contact the Ship Services Department. For guests with life-threatening food... Read more

Age Restrictions

Guests under 21 years of age must be accompanied by a parent, guardian or chaperone who is at least 21 years old;... Read more

Dress Code

The right clothing can make a big difference in the enjoyment of your cruise. First and foremost, dress for comfort. Daily life... Read more

E-Cigarette Policy

Electronic cigarettes are permitted in staterooms but not in other public areas of the ship other than on outside decks designated as... Read more

Sailing
Cabin
Details
Payment

Choose a sailing to book

Interior
Window
Balcony
Suite
Book with confidence

We know these are uncertain times, but don't fret. All bookings are covered by our Financial Protection Guarantee and we only work with cruise lines that are members of ATOL and ABTA. For more information about cancellation cover, visit the Coronavirus Cancellation Policies page.

How many people will be travelling?


* Passengers should be aged under 18 at the time of embarkation to qualify as a child.
Prices shown are per person based on two people sharing (unless otherwise specfied) in GBP and subject to availability. Certain restrictions can apply. Prices are updated on a daily basis and may vary when continuing through the booking process.