Cunard

16-night New Zealand and South Australia

Queen Elizabeth

Join us on Queen Elizabeth and immerse yourself in her evocative art deco elegance. Our newest Queen exudes style and has an especially refined feel. Prepare yourself for a truly remarkable voyage.

Explore the ship
Itinerary highlights
The skyline in Melbourne, Australia Melbourne Australia
Auckland New Zealand
Ship highlights
Photo of the Queen's Grill Queen's Grill
Photo of the Cunard Insights Cunard Insights
Photo of the Book Club Book Club
from
£2,399
per person
from
£150
per night
11 Feb 2022
£2,499 £2,399
11 Feb 2022
£2,649
11 Feb 2022
£2,799
11 Feb 2022
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The itinerary

Australians think of Adelaide as a city of churches, but Adelaide has outgrown its reputation as a sleepy country town dotted with cathedrals and spires. The Adelaide of this millennium is infinitely more complex, with a large, multiethnic population and thriving urban art and music scenes supported by a "space activation program" that encourages pop-up shops, markets, performances, street food, mini festivals, art exhibitions, and other "off-the-cuff" experiences in the cities underutilized streets and public spaces.Bright and clean, leafy and beautiful Adelaide is a breeze to explore, with a grid pattern of streets encircled by parkland. The heart of the greenbelt is divided by the meandering River Torrens, which passes the Festival Centre in its prettiest stretch.

Kangaroo Island is with 1,740 square miles the third largest island off the coast of Australia. It is 96 miles long and 34 miles wide, and known for its outstanding natural beauty. Due to its remote location, Kangaroo Island was less affected than the mainland by the impact of European development. To this day, the island is rich in diverse flora and fauna seldom found elsewhere. As one of the world’s last unspoiled wilderness places, about 30 percent of the island has been designated as National Parks. The most important one is Flinders Chase at the western end of Kangaroo Island, with Seal Bay Conservation Park following close behind. Its large sandy beach and dune area is home to Australian sea lions where they come to rest and nurse their young. Kingscote, formerly known as Queenscliffe, is the largest town on the island and its main supply depot. Tourism is a significant element in the local economy. A mix of attractive small townships, wildlife sanctuaries and fascinating wilderness areas guarantee a steady stream of visitors each year.

Day 3At Sea

Consistently rated among the "world's most livable cities" in quality-of-life surveys, Melbourne is built on a coastal plain at the top of the giant horseshoe of Port Phillip Bay. The city center is an orderly grid of streets where the state parliament, banks, multinational corporations, and splendid Victorian buildings that sprang up in the wake of the gold rush now stand. This is Melbourne's heart, which you can explore at a leisurely pace in a couple of days.In Southbank, one of the newer precincts south of the city center, the Southgate development of bars, restaurants, and shops has refocused Melbourne's vision on the Yarra River. Once a blighted stretch of factories and run-down warehouses, the southern bank of the river is now a vibrant, exciting part of the city, and the river itself is finally taking its rightful place in Melbourne's psyche.Just a hop away, Federation Square—with its host of galleries—has become a civic landmark for Melburnians. Stroll along the Esplanade in the suburb of St. Kilda, amble past the elegant houses of East Melbourne, enjoy the shops and cafés in Fitzroy or Carlton, rub shoulders with locals at the Victoria Market, nip into the Windsor for afternoon tea, or rent a canoe at Studley Park to paddle along one of the prettiest stretches of the Yarra—and you may discover Melbourne's soul as well as its heart.

The skyline in Melbourne, Australia

Day 5At Sea

Day 6At Sea

Clinging to the walls of the natural amphitheater at the west end of Otago Harbour, the South Island's second-largest city is enriched with inspiring nearby seascapes and wildlife. Because Dunedin is a university town, floods of students give the city a vitality far greater than its population of 122,000 might suggest. Its manageable size makes it easy to explore on foot—with the possible exception of Baldwin Street, the world's steepest residential street and home to the annual "gutbuster" race, in which people run up it, and the "Jaffa" race, in which people roll the namesake spherical chocolate candy down it.Dunedin, the Gaelic name for Edinburgh, was founded in 1848 by settlers of the Free Church of Scotland, a breakaway group from the Presbyterian Church. The city's Scottish roots are still visible; you'll find New Zealand's first and only (legal) whisky distillery, a statue of Scottish poet Robert Burns, and more kilts, sporrans, and gillies than you can shake a stick at! The Scottish settlers and local Māori came together in relative peace, but this wasn't true of the European whalers who were here three decades before, as places with names such as Murdering Beach illustrate.Dunedin has always had a reputation for the eccentric. Wearing no shoes and a big beard here marks a man as bohemian rather than destitute, and the residents wouldn't have it any other way. The University of Otago was the country's first university and has been drawing writers ever since its founding in 1871, most notably Janet Frame and the poet James K. Baxter. Dunedin also has a musical heritage, which blossomed into the "Dunedin Sound" of the 1970s and '80s.

Your initial impression of Christchurch will likely be one of a genteel, green city. Joggers loop through shady Hagley Park, and punters ply the narrow Avon River, which bubbles between banks lined with willows and oaks. With a population approaching 350,000, Christchurch is the largest South Island city, and the second-largest in the country. It is also the forward supply depot for the main U.S. Antarctic base at McMurdo Sound. The face of Christchurch is changing rapidly, fueled by both internal and international immigration. The Māori community, although still below the national average in size, is growing. Ngai Tahu, the main South Island Māori tribe, settled Treaty of Waitangi claims in 1997 and have been investing in tourism ventures. Old wooden bungalows are making way for town houses, the arts scene is flourishing, and the city's university attracts cutting-edge technology companies. In short, there's plenty of fresh energy percolating underneath the English veneer.

The maritime township of Picton (population 4,000) lies at the head of Queen Charlotte Sound and is the arrival point for ferries from the North Island, as well as a growing number of international cruise ships. It plays a major role in providing services and transport by water taxi to a multitude of remote communities in the vast area of islands, peninsulas, and waterways that make up the Marlborough Sounds Maritime Park. There's plenty to do in town, with crafts markets in summer, historical sights to see, and walking tracks to scenic lookouts over the sounds. The main foreshore is lined by London Quay, which looks up Queen Charlotte Sound to the bays beyond. High Street runs down to London Quay from the hills, and between them these two streets make up the center of town.

Day 11At Sea

Auckland is called the City of Sails, and visitors flying in will see why. On the East Coast is the Waitemata Harbour—a Māori word meaning sparkling waters—which is bordered by the Hauraki Gulf, an aquatic playground peppered with small islands where many Aucklanders can be found "mucking around in boats."Not surprisingly, Auckland has some 70,000 boats. About one in four households in Auckland has a seacraft of some kind, and there are 102 beaches within an hour's drive; during the week many are quite empty. Even the airport is by the water; it borders the Manukau Harbour, which also takes its name from the Māori language and means solitary bird.According to Māori tradition, the Auckland isthmus was originally peopled by a race of giants and fairy folk. When Europeans arrived in the early 19th century, however, the Ngāti-Whātua tribe was firmly in control of the region. The British began negotiations with the Ngāti-Whātua in 1840 to purchase the isthmus and establish the colony's first capital. In September of that year the British flag was hoisted to mark the township's foundation, and Auckland remained the capital until 1865, when the seat of government was moved to Wellington. Aucklanders expected to suffer from the shift; it hurt their pride but not their pockets. As the terminal for the South Sea shipping routes, Auckland was already an established commercial center. Since then the urban sprawl has made this city of approximately 1.3 million people one of the world's largest geographically.A couple of days in the city will reveal just how developed and sophisticated Auckland is—the Mercer City Survey 2012 saw it ranked as the third-highest city for quality of life—though those seeking a New York in the South Pacific will be disappointed. Auckland is more get-up and go-outside than get-dressed-up and go-out. That said, most shops are open daily, central bars and a few nightclubs buzz well into the wee hours, especially Thursday through Saturday, and a mix of Māori, Pacific people, Asians, and Europeans contributes to the cultural milieu. Auckland has the world's largest single population of Pacific Islanders living outside their home countries, though many of them live outside the central parts of the city and in Manukau to the south. The Samoan language is the second most spoken in New Zealand. Most Pacific people came to New Zealand seeking a better life. When the plentiful, low-skilled work that attracted them dried up, the dream soured, and the population has suffered with poor health and education. Luckily, policies are now addressing that, and change is slowly coming. The Pacifica Festival in March is the region's biggest cultural event, attracting thousands to Western Springs. The annual Pacific Island Secondary Schools’ Competition, also in March, sees young Pacific Islander and Asian students compete in traditional dance, drumming, and singing. This event is open to the public.At the geographical center of Auckland city is the 1,082-foot Sky Tower, a convenient landmark for those exploring on foot and some say a visible sign of the city's naked aspiration. It has earned nicknames like the Needle and the Big Penis—a counterpoint to a poem by acclaimed New Zealand poet James K. Baxter, which refers to Rangitoto Island as a clitoris in the harbor.The Waitemata Harbour has become better known since New Zealand staged its first defense of the America's Cup in 2000 and the successful Louis Vuitton Pacific Series in early 2009. The first regatta saw major redevelopment of the waterfront. The area, where many of the city's most popular bars, cafés, and restaurants are located, is now known as Viaduct Basin or, more commonly, the Viaduct. A recent expansion has created another area, Wynyard Quarter, which is slowly adding restaurants.These days, Auckland is still considered too bold and brash for its own good by many Kiwis who live "south of the Bombay Hills," the geographical divide between Auckland and the rest of New Zealand (barring Northland). "Jafa," an acronym for "just another f—ing Aucklander," has entered the local lexicon; there's even a book out called Way of the Jafa: A Guide to Surviving Auckland and Aucklanders. A common complaint is that Auckland absorbs the wealth from the hard work of the rest of the country. Most Aucklanders, on the other hand, still try to shrug and see it as the parochial envy of those who live in small towns. But these internal identity squabbles aren't your problem. You can enjoy a well-made coffee in almost any café, or take a walk on a beach—knowing that within 30 minutes' driving time you could be cruising the spectacular harbor, playing a round at a public golf course, or even walking in subtropical forest while listening to the song of a native tûî bird.

The Tasman Sea on the west and the Pacific Ocean on the east meet at thetop of North Island at Cape Reinga. No matter what route you take, you'll passfarms and forests, marvellous beaches, and great open spaces. The East Coast,up to the Bay of Islands, is Northland's most densely populated, often withrefugees from bigger cities—looking for a more relaxed life—clustered aroundbreathtaking beaches. The first decision on the drive north comes at the footof the Brynderwyn Hills. Turning left will take you up the West Coast throughareas once covered with forests and now used for either agricultural orhorticulture. Driving over "the Brynderwyns," as they are known,takes you to Whangarei, the only city in Northland. If you're in the mood for adiversion, you can slip to the beautiful coastline and take in Waipu Cove, anarea settled by Scots, and Laings Beach, where million-dollar homes sit next tosmall Kiwi beach houses.An hour's drive farther north is the Bay of Islands, known all over theworld for its beauty. There you will find lush forests, splendid beaches, andshimmering harbors. The Treaty of Waitangi was signed here in 1840 betweenMāoriand the British Crown, establishing the basis for the modern New Zealandstate. Every year on February 6, the extremely beautiful Waitangi Treaty Ground(the name means weeping waters) is the sight of a celebration of the treaty andprotests by Māori unhappy with it. Continuing north on the East Coast, theagricultural backbone of the region is even more evident and a series ofwinding loop roads off the main highway will take you to beaches that are bothbeautiful and isolated where you can swim, dive, picnic, or just laze. .The West Coast is even less populated, and the coastline is rugged andwindswept. In the Waipoua Forest, you will find some of New Zealand's oldestand largest kauri trees; the winding road will also take you past mangroveswamps. Crowning the region is the spiritually significant Cape Reinga, theheadland at the top of the vast stretch of 90 Mile Beach, where it's believedMāori souls depart after death. Today Māori make up roughly a quarter of thearea's population (compared with the national average of about 15%). The legendaryMāori navigator Kupe was said to have landed on the shores of Hokianga Harbour,where the first arrivals made their home. Many different wi (tribes) livedthroughout Northland, including Ngapuhi (the largest), Te Roroa, Ngati Wai,Ngati Kuri, Te Aupouri, Ngaitakoto, Ngati Kahu, and Te Rarawa. Many Māoriherecan trace their ancestry to the earliest inhabitants

Day 14At Sea

Day 15At Sea

Day 16At Sea

Consistently rated among the "world's most livable cities" in quality-of-life surveys, Melbourne is built on a coastal plain at the top of the giant horseshoe of Port Phillip Bay. The city center is an orderly grid of streets where the state parliament, banks, multinational corporations, and splendid Victorian buildings that sprang up in the wake of the gold rush now stand. This is Melbourne's heart, which you can explore at a leisurely pace in a couple of days.In Southbank, one of the newer precincts south of the city center, the Southgate development of bars, restaurants, and shops has refocused Melbourne's vision on the Yarra River. Once a blighted stretch of factories and run-down warehouses, the southern bank of the river is now a vibrant, exciting part of the city, and the river itself is finally taking its rightful place in Melbourne's psyche.Just a hop away, Federation Square—with its host of galleries—has become a civic landmark for Melburnians. Stroll along the Esplanade in the suburb of St. Kilda, amble past the elegant houses of East Melbourne, enjoy the shops and cafés in Fitzroy or Carlton, rub shoulders with locals at the Victoria Market, nip into the Windsor for afternoon tea, or rent a canoe at Studley Park to paddle along one of the prettiest stretches of the Yarra—and you may discover Melbourne's soul as well as its heart.

The skyline in Melbourne, Australia

The ship Queen Elizabeth

Join us on Queen Elizabeth and immerse yourself in her evocative art deco elegance. Our newest Queen exudes style and has an especially refined feel. Prepare yourself for a truly remarkable voyage.

Capacity
2081
Cabins
1043
Total crew
1005
Length
964m

Food and drink

A range of complimentary and speciality dining restaurants are available, with menus created by Jean-Marie Zimmermann, Cunard’s Global Culinary Ambassador. Tables for 4-8 are typical, with seating allocated prior to cruising. Limited numbers of tables for two are available on request.

Queen's Grill

The Queen's Grill is a luxurious, fine-dining venue reserved exclusively for Queens Grill Suite passengers. The elegant restaurant is open for breakfast,... Read more

Complimentary
Fine

Princess Grill

The Princess Grill offers an intimate, fine dining experience, reserved exclusively for Princess Grill Suite passengers. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner,... Read more

Complimentary
Fine

Britannia & Britannia Club Restaurant

Make a dramatic entrance down the grand staircase into the elegant Britannia two tier dining room and revel in the sumptuous menus... Read more

Complimentary
Fine

The Verandah

The Verandah is Queen Elizabeth's formal alternative dining venue and is your invitation to savour contemporary French cuisine that uses traditional ingredients... Read more

Cover
French

The Lido Restaurant

Should you prefer a club sandwich or a light bite in the afternoon head for the Lido restaurant where buffet dining is... Read more

Cover
Regional

Queen's Room

The elegant tradition of Afternoon Tea is a Cunard signature not to be missed. White-gloved waiters serve delightful cucumber sandwiches, fresh scones... Read more

Complimentary
Classic

Entertainment

Queen Elizabeth provides you with a wealth of engaging experiences to keep you entertained day and night. From spectacular theatrical performances to the excitement of the casino, there's something to keep everyone happy.

Yacht Club

Venture into the Yacht Club in the after hours and dance the night away. Named after the lively QE2 venue, with its... Read more

The Royal Court Theatre

Designed in an elegant opera house style, The Royal Court Theatre showcases classic and modern films during the afternoon, with fantastic live... Read more

Empire Casino

This elegant casino will set your heart racing as you spin the roulette wheel, play the slots or try your hand at... Read more

Galleries

Art connoisseurs can enjoy a choice of three galleries. Cladendon Fine Art features original artwork and lithographs by 20th and 21st century... Read more

Shopping

The ship features a variety of shops for those who enjoy a spot of retail therapy. Passengers can find designer brands in... Read more

Queens Room

The wonderful Queens Room provides the opportunity to foxtrot in the largest ballroom at sea. There is no better place to hone... Read more

Royal Night Theme Balls

Royal night themed balls in the magnificent Queens Room Ballroom are your chance to don your formal dancing attire and take to... Read more

The Commodore Club

Located on deck 10 at the front of the ship, the Commodore Club provides magnificent views across the ocean or your delightful... Read more

The Golden Lion

A Cunard favourite, choose from a wide selection of beer, cider and wine to compliment the delicious gastro pub style menus in... Read more

Cafe Carinthia

Located in a central position on Deck 2, overlooking the Grand Lobby, Cafe Carinthia is the perfect place to sit and relax... Read more

The Garden Lounge

A light and sociable room, inspired by Kew Gardens. Spend a lazy afternoon reading a book or relaxing with a Garden Lounge... Read more

Health and fitness

The ship features a fantastic array of health and fitness facilities for passengers that wish to stay active or relax and be pampered. These include a spa, fitness centre, games deck and sports courts.

Royal Spa

The Royal Spa, takes you on a blissful journey of relaxation, thanks to its range of innovative and indulgent treatments, massages and... Read more

Fitness Centre

Passengers who wish to stay active can make use of the fully equipped gymnasium. As well as state of the art gym... Read more

Games Deck

When the warm weather entices you onto the spacious Games Deck you’ll notice a definite English country garden ambience, with the gentle... Read more

Sports

The ship also offers a wide variety of sports facilities for passengers who want to stay active during their cruise. These fantastic... Read more

Swimming Pools

In warm weather, deck 9 is the place to be with a choice of two inviting swimming pools, The Pavilion and The... Read more

Kids and teens

For younger cruise passengers, there are a number of facilities available to keep them entertained. Running primarily during the school holidays, kids clubs are available for children or teens travelling on Queen Elizabeth.

Night Nursery

Open between 6pm – 11pm, the Night Nursery operates on a first come, first served basis. Providing trained childcare for 12-23 month... Read more

Play Zone

Designed for 2-7's, Play Zone provides a supervised play area for some of Cunard’s youngest passengers. The club features arts and crafts,... Read more

Kids Zone

A supervised play area for 8-12's, Kids Zone provides games, consoles, activities, arts and crafts for kids to enjoy, along with sports... Read more

Teen Zone

Providing a space for teens to relax, 13-17's can take part in team games, deck sports and tennis tournaments. Trained staff also... Read more

Enrichment

Enrichment programs and lectures on contemporary and classical subjects are popular features on Cunard cruises. Queen Elizabeth covers a wide range of activities from ballroom dancing to computing lessons.

Cunard Insights

Explore a number of historical and contemporary issues presented by a wide range of speakers. These can include explorers, academics, former ambassadors... Read more

Book Club

The Cunard Book Club offers the opportunity for thought-provoking literary discussions among guests during each voyage. It is led by the Librarian... Read more

Cunard ConneXions

Cunard ConneXions offers a programme of activities all day every day from watercolour to computer lessons, wine tasting to ballroom dancing as... Read more

Useful info

Special Dietary Requirements

The ship can cater for the following dietary requirements on request: Vegetarian, low /no fat, low salt /no salt, lactose intolerant ,... Read more

Dress Code

During the day casual shirts, shorts, trousers and beachwear are ideal. The main restaurants require a casual dress code for breakfast and... Read more

Disabled Facilites

Fully accessible adapted cabins are available onboard the ship and some suites are also suitable for wheelchair users as the cabin door... Read more

Smoking & E-cigarette Policy

There are dedicated areas on the ship where passengers are permitted to smoke. Smoking is not permitted in any public room, inside... Read more

Age Restrictions

Children older than six months may travel with Cunard, however Transatlantic crossings have a minimum age requirement of 12 months. Guests under... Read more

A world of beauty and wonder

Our commitment to preserving the environment.

Cunard and our parent company Carnival Corporation and plc take our environmental stewardship very seriously and are... Read more

Carnival's 2020 targets

Carbon footprint

Committed to sustainability and environmental protection in the communities it visits, Carnival Corporation and plc has effectively reduced its carbon footprint... Read more

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* Passengers should be aged under 18 at the time of embarkation to qualify as a child.
Prices shown are per person based on two people sharing (unless otherwise specfied) in GBP and subject to availability. Certain restrictions can apply. Prices are updated on a daily basis and may vary when continuing through the booking process.