Princess Cruises

6-night Korea & Japan Getaway

Diamond Princess

As one of only two Princess Cruises cruise ships built in Japan, it’s not surprising this exotic gem can often be found sailing to the most intriguing vacation destinations abroad.

Explore the ship
Itinerary highlights
Yokohama Japan
Nagasaki Japan
Busan South Korea
Ship highlights
Photo of the Traditional Dining Room- International Dining Room Traditional Dining Room- International Dining Room
Photo of the Edutainment Edutainment
from
£699
per person
from
£117
per night
Free cancellation up to 30 days before you sail through 30 April 2021
Free Balcony Upgrade
7 Jul 2021
£739 £699
13 Jul 2021
£739 £699
7 Jul 2021
£759 £749
13 Jul 2021
£759 £749
7 Jul 2021
£1,149
13 Jul 2021
£1,149
7 Jul 2021
£1,259
13 Jul 2021
£1,259
Book from £699 Email me this cruise

Cruise with Confidence

Cancel your cruise for free up to 30 days before your sail date and get a future cruise credit in the amount of non-refundable fees (the remainder will be refunded to you). Applies to sailings departing through 30 April 2021.

Find out more

The itinerary

In 1853, a fleet of four American warships under Commodore Matthew Perry sailed into the bay of Tokyo (then Edo) and presented the reluctant Japanese with the demands of the U.S. government for the opening of diplomatic and commercial relations. The following year Perry returned and first set foot on Japanese soil at Yokohama—then a small fishing village on the mudflats of Tokyo bay. Two years later New York businessman Townsend Harris became America's first diplomatic representative to Japan. In 1858 he was finally able to negotiate a commercial treaty between the two countries; part of the deal designated four locations—one of them Yokohama—as treaty ports. In 1859 the shogunate created a special settlement in Yokohama for the growing community of merchants, traders, missionaries, and other assorted adventurers drawn to this exotic new land of opportunity. The foreigners (predominantly Chinese and British, plus a few French, Americans, and Dutch) were confined here to a guarded compound about 5 square km (2 square miles)—placed, in effect, in isolation—but not for long. Within a few short years the shogunal government collapsed, and Japan began to modernize. Western ideas were welcomed, as were Western goods, and the little treaty port became Japan's principal gateway to the outside world. In 1872 Japan's first railway was built, linking Yokohama and Tokyo. In 1889 Yokohama became a city; by then the population had grown to some 120,000. As the city prospered, so did the international community and by the early 1900s Yokohama was the busiest and most modern center of international trade in all of East Asia. Then Yokohama came tumbling down. On September 1, 1923, the Great Kanto Earthquake devastated the city. The ensuing fires destroyed some 60,000 homes and took more than 40,000 lives. During the six years it took to rebuild the city, many foreign businesses took up quarters elsewhere, primarily in Kobe and Osaka, and did not return. Over the next 20 years Yokohama continued to grow as an industrial center—until May 29, 1945, when in a span of four hours, some 500 American B-29 bombers leveled nearly half the city and left more than half a million people homeless. When the war ended, what remained became—in effect—the center of the Allied occupation. General Douglas MacArthur set up headquarters here, briefly, before moving to Tokyo; the entire port facility and about a quarter of the city remained in the hands of the U.S. military throughout the 1950s. By the 1970s Yokohama was once more rising from the debris; in 1978 it surpassed Osaka as the nation's second-largest city, and the population is now inching up to the 3.5 million mark. Boosted by Japan's postwar economic miracle, Yokohama has extended its urban sprawl north to Tokyo and south to Kamakura—in the process creating a whole new subcenter around the Shinkansen Station at Shin-Yokohama. The development of air travel and the competition from other ports have changed the city's role in Japan's economy. The great liners that once docked at Yokohama's piers are now but a memory, kept alive by a museum ship and the occasional visit of a luxury vessel on a Pacific cruise. Modern Large as Yokohama is, the central area is very negotiable. As with any other port city, much of what it has to offer centers on the waterfront—in this case, on the west side of Tokyo Bay. The downtown area is called Kannai (literally, "within the checkpoint"); this is where the international community was originally confined by the shogunate. Though the center of interest has expanded to include the waterfront and Ishikawa-cho, to the south, Kannai remains the heart of town. Think of that heart as two adjacent areas. One is the old district of Kannai, bounded by Basha-michi on the northwest and Nippon-odori on the southeast, the Keihin Tohoku Line tracks on the southwest, and the waterfront on the northeast. This area contains the business offices of modern Yokohama. The other area extends southeast from Nippon-odori to the Moto-machi shopping street and the International Cemetery, bordered by Yamashita Koen and the waterfront to the northeast; in the center is Chinatown, with Ishikawa-cho Station to the southwest. This is the most interesting part of town for tourists. Whether you're coming from Tokyo, Nagoya, or Kamakura, make Ishikawa-cho Station your starting point. Take the South Exit from the station and head in the direction of the waterfront.

Day 2At Sea

Nagasaki city has developed into one of the most important port cities in Japan. During Japan’s period of isolation in the 17th century, Nagasaki played a prominent role in foreign trade relation and only a very few ports were open to restricted numbers of foreign traders. Even though Holland was a major country who conducted trading during this period, Dutch people were only allowed to stay in Dejima Island and were not allowed to have contact with the Japanese people. Today, you will still find the strong influence of Dutch and Chinese culture in the city which is very different from all other cities in Japan. In the more recent history, Nagasaki became the second city after Hiroshima to be destroyed by an atomic bomb towards the end of World War II. From the visit to Atomic bomb museum and peace memorial park, people could understand how chaotic the situation was and the agony that the people in the days have experienced from the damage inflicted by the atomic bomb. It continues to appeal to the world with their wish for world peace.

White-sand city beaches and hot-spring resorts may not be everyone's first image of Korea, but these are what Koreans flock to Busan for all year. And there are plenty of opportunities for rest, relaxation, retail therapy, and even a touch of glamour every October with the Busan International Film Festival. Busan's beaches are the big summertime draw but there is plenty to be seen year round. Quintessential experiences include taking some rest and relaxation at a local spa and exploring the Beomeosa temple complex.

Kagoshima city is the capital of Kagoshima prefecture and also Kyushu’s southernmost major city. This city is often compared to its Italian sister city Naples, due to its’s similarities such as mild climate and active volcano, Sakurajima. Sakurajima is one of the most renowned active volcanos not only in Japan but also in the whole entire world. This smoking Sakurajima is centred in Kinko Bay and is one of the main symbols of this prefecture. We cannot talk about Sakurajima without the history of continuous eruption. Sakurajima used to be an isolated island; however, the land has banded together with Osumi peninsula from the eruption in 1914. You may have a chance to see the smoke coming from the top of Sakurajima depending on the weather condition. Not only does the scenery of Sakurajima represent the beauty of Kagoshima City but Senganen garden is also symbolic to elegance in the Kagoshima region. This Japanese garden was constructed by a feudal lord, Mitsuhisa Shimazu, as a guest house of the Kagoshima castle which attracts many visitors for its splendid view.

Day 6At Sea

In 1853, a fleet of four American warships under Commodore Matthew Perry sailed into the bay of Tokyo (then Edo) and presented the reluctant Japanese with the demands of the U.S. government for the opening of diplomatic and commercial relations. The following year Perry returned and first set foot on Japanese soil at Yokohama—then a small fishing village on the mudflats of Tokyo bay. Two years later New York businessman Townsend Harris became America's first diplomatic representative to Japan. In 1858 he was finally able to negotiate a commercial treaty between the two countries; part of the deal designated four locations—one of them Yokohama—as treaty ports. In 1859 the shogunate created a special settlement in Yokohama for the growing community of merchants, traders, missionaries, and other assorted adventurers drawn to this exotic new land of opportunity. The foreigners (predominantly Chinese and British, plus a few French, Americans, and Dutch) were confined here to a guarded compound about 5 square km (2 square miles)—placed, in effect, in isolation—but not for long. Within a few short years the shogunal government collapsed, and Japan began to modernize. Western ideas were welcomed, as were Western goods, and the little treaty port became Japan's principal gateway to the outside world. In 1872 Japan's first railway was built, linking Yokohama and Tokyo. In 1889 Yokohama became a city; by then the population had grown to some 120,000. As the city prospered, so did the international community and by the early 1900s Yokohama was the busiest and most modern center of international trade in all of East Asia. Then Yokohama came tumbling down. On September 1, 1923, the Great Kanto Earthquake devastated the city. The ensuing fires destroyed some 60,000 homes and took more than 40,000 lives. During the six years it took to rebuild the city, many foreign businesses took up quarters elsewhere, primarily in Kobe and Osaka, and did not return. Over the next 20 years Yokohama continued to grow as an industrial center—until May 29, 1945, when in a span of four hours, some 500 American B-29 bombers leveled nearly half the city and left more than half a million people homeless. When the war ended, what remained became—in effect—the center of the Allied occupation. General Douglas MacArthur set up headquarters here, briefly, before moving to Tokyo; the entire port facility and about a quarter of the city remained in the hands of the U.S. military throughout the 1950s. By the 1970s Yokohama was once more rising from the debris; in 1978 it surpassed Osaka as the nation's second-largest city, and the population is now inching up to the 3.5 million mark. Boosted by Japan's postwar economic miracle, Yokohama has extended its urban sprawl north to Tokyo and south to Kamakura—in the process creating a whole new subcenter around the Shinkansen Station at Shin-Yokohama. The development of air travel and the competition from other ports have changed the city's role in Japan's economy. The great liners that once docked at Yokohama's piers are now but a memory, kept alive by a museum ship and the occasional visit of a luxury vessel on a Pacific cruise. Modern Large as Yokohama is, the central area is very negotiable. As with any other port city, much of what it has to offer centers on the waterfront—in this case, on the west side of Tokyo Bay. The downtown area is called Kannai (literally, "within the checkpoint"); this is where the international community was originally confined by the shogunate. Though the center of interest has expanded to include the waterfront and Ishikawa-cho, to the south, Kannai remains the heart of town. Think of that heart as two adjacent areas. One is the old district of Kannai, bounded by Basha-michi on the northwest and Nippon-odori on the southeast, the Keihin Tohoku Line tracks on the southwest, and the waterfront on the northeast. This area contains the business offices of modern Yokohama. The other area extends southeast from Nippon-odori to the Moto-machi shopping street and the International Cemetery, bordered by Yamashita Koen and the waterfront to the northeast; in the center is Chinatown, with Ishikawa-cho Station to the southwest. This is the most interesting part of town for tourists. Whether you're coming from Tokyo, Nagoya, or Kamakura, make Ishikawa-cho Station your starting point. Take the South Exit from the station and head in the direction of the waterfront.

The ship Diamond Princess

As one of only two Princess Cruises cruise ships built in Japan, it’s not surprising this exotic gem can often be found sailing to the most intriguing vacation destinations abroad.

Capacity
2670
Cabins
1337
Total crew
1100
Length
952m

Food and drink

The Princess chefs are true culinary artists who insist on serving the very finest cuisine - and it shows. The entire fleet has been inducted into the prestigious Chaîne des Rôtisseurs gastronomic society. Each chef's menu is creative and the selections change every day. Pair that with impeccable service and you're in for an unforgettable gourmet experience.

Traditional Dining Room- International Dining Room

For guests who prefer the traditional cruise ship dining experience, the ship offers a main dining room option in which they can... Read more

Complimentary
Classic

Sabatini's

This Italian restaurant is a refined yet casual dining establishment rich in atmosphere, showcasing an Italian and Mediterranean menu with a heavy... Read more

Cover
Italian

Vivaldi Dining Room

The Vivaldi Dining Room is open for traditional dining at 5.30pm or anytime dining between 8pm and 10pm.

The Vivaldi Dining Room is... Read more

Cover
Surf Turf

Anytime Dining- Pacific Moon & Savoy Dining Rooms

The Savoy Dining Room on the Diamond Princess is one of  the dining rooms open on certain days for lunch serving a traditional... Read more

Complimentary
Classic

Casual Dining

Want to maximise your pool time and minimise your mealtime? Get a quick and satisfying bite whenever you like at our Casual... Read more

Pizzeria

Horizon Court Buffet

An expanded top-deck buffet featuring multiple live stations, Horizon Court offers a wide selection of buffet meals or snacks. A primary feature of... Read more

Complimentary
Buffet

Vines

Casual Dining at its best, a Wine, sushi and tapas bar. Voted one of the 'Best Wine Bars at Sea' by USA Today!

This... Read more

Cover
Tapas

Ultimate Balcony Dining

Choose a luxurious breakfast or experience the "ultimate" romantic dinner at sea: a sumptuous four-course meal, including succulent lobster tail and juicy... Read more

Cover
Room

Afternoon Tea

All ships offer Princess’ trademark British-style afternoon tea daily, complete with tablecloths, gleaming Samovars, easy listening music in the background, and tea... Read more

Cover
British

Chef's Table

The Chef's Table experience provides the chance to tour the ship's busy galley during dinner service, where the ship's executive chef previews... Read more

Cover
Classic

Kai Sushi

An exquisitely decorated traditional sushi bar on Deck 7, serving up sushi and sashimi expertly prepared before your eyes. Dine at the... Read more

Cover
Sushi

Sterling Steakhouse

The Sterling Steakhouse, located on the 14th Deck within the Horizon Court is open from 6.00pm to 11pm. Guests can choose from... Read more

Cover
Surf Turf

Santa Fe Dining Room

The Santa Fe Dining room is open for anytime dining at dinner time between 5.30pm and 10pm.

Santa Fe's speciality is chicken or... Read more

Complimentary
Mexican

Entertainment

To say the night-life on-board is entertaining is an understatement. Illuminating the stage in captivating productions, Princess Cruises performers are some of the most talented musicians, singers and dancers at sea. Our Princess Signature Shows, lounge performers, movies and casinos are just some of the entertainment our guests enjoy as they escape completely.

Princess Theatre

Princess Cruises largest theatre yet, with sophisticated architectural lighting. West End-style shows are on every cruise, with more than one performance each... Read more

Movies Under The Stars

The 300 square foot outdoor movie theatre offers a unique opportunity to enjoy blockbuster movies against a backdrop of twinkling stars. Personal... Read more

Grand Casino

Choose from 17 table games in this spacious casino, located on Deck 6. 

Featuring games tables including roulette, poker, craps and blackjack it... Read more

Explorer's Lounge

Explorers Lounge on the 7th Deck is Diamond Princess' second entertainment venue with its own dance floor, bar serving wine and cocktails... Read more

Skywalker's Nightclub

A popular, top-deck nightclub up on Deck 18.

During the day its location makes it an ideal observation lounge to sit and enjoy... Read more

Club Fusion

Offering a selection of Latin and Rhythm & Blue music, this show lounge is host to Karaoke contests and themed parties.

With plenty... Read more

Wheelhouse Bar

The Wheelhouse bar, located on the 7th Deck outside the theatre, serves premium beers, wines and spirits and is decorated in the... Read more

Crooners Bar

The Crooners Lounge and Bar, located midship on deck 7 opens from 1pm onwards and is reminiscent of a classic Martini bar.

Evening... Read more

Churchill Cigar Lounge

A small lounge with a relaxing atmosphere, providing guests with a place to relax with a glass of single malt whiskey or vintage... Read more

Internet Café

The internet is available onboard the ship either in the Internet Café on Deck 5 or via passengers' personal wi-fi devices. Charges apply.

Shops & Boutiques

The boutiques onboard offer more than just accessories and sundries you may have left at home. Shop onboard and benefit from incredible... Read more

Platinum Studio

The Platinum Studio, located on the 19th Deck in between the sports court and Princess Links mini golf, provides guests with the... Read more

Wake View Bar

The Wake View Bar is a quiet, mainly unstaffed bar located aft of the Promenade Deck behind club fusion.

As such it makes... Read more

Pool Bars

The Mermaids Tail bar serves the Neptune pool area and is located forward of the 14th Deck.

It also sells a small... Read more

Health and fitness

The many activities on-board our ships are designed to stimulate, educate, entertain, inspire and sweat - not necessarily in that order. But, guests can be sure crew onboard will do their best to cover all the bases. From art auctions to The Sanctuary Spa, this ship is loaded with fun things to do.

Pools & Hot tubs

Sometimes floating serenely just isn't enough - splash around, ride the waves, swim against the current in the Lap Pool or take... Read more

Sports & Fitness Centre

This ship will keep you on the run, literally, with basketball, paddle tennis, jogging tracks and state-of-the-art gyms equipped with machines that'll... Read more

The Sanctuary

Leave stress at the door when you enter this blissful signature haven exclusively for adults. Perfect for that al fresco massage, feel... Read more

Lotus Spa

In the Lotus Spa, cruisers will find a welcoming feel and contemporary, sophisticated décor, New features include private Couples Villas and The... Read more

Kids and teens

Passengers ages 3 to 17 will enjoy many exciting on-board activities. The Youth Centres and Teen Lounges are staffed by experienced counsellors, who are ready to ensure the youngest cruisers stay happy all day long. There’s everything from art projects, game tables, the latest movies, pizza parties, talent shows, video games, and much more.

Children under the age of 3 are welcome to visit the Youth Centre, if accompanied and supervised by a parent at all times.

Princess Pelicans

Ages 3-7- There’s an exciting toddler area, a mini air hockey table, great arts and crafts stations, plus a space for group activities... Read more

Shockwaves

Ages 8-12- Offering games and activities like air hockey, skeeball, and video game stations – not to mention a dedicated lounge with a... Read more

Remix

Ages 13-17- Featuring a new lounge area, perfect for meeting new friends, with skeeball, foosball, and great video games. In the teen-only exclusive... Read more

Enrichment

When is a cruise an opportunity to enrich? When it's a Princess cruise. This ship offers area lectures, art exhibits and classes taught by local experts.

Edutainment

Princess Cruises believe learning is fun. Through their exclusive partnership with the California Science Centre, their Youth Staff are trained to deliver... Read more

[email protected]

Expand your mind with an array of engaging [email protected] opportunities. There are up to 40 classes on every cruise. Tantalise your taste... Read more

Art Collections, Galleries and Auctions

Princess Fine Arts auctions* are fun, fast-paced, and offer an exciting opportunity to collect exceptional works of art. You’ll find some of... Read more

Useful info

Disabled Facilities

Wheelchair users will find access-friendly design across most of the Princess fleet, making it easy to enjoy each vessel's restaurants, theaters, spas,... Read more

Special Dietary Requirements

Princess Cruises are happy to meet your request for low-sodium, low-fat, low-sugar and vegetarian diets. Kosher meals and baby food are available... Read more

Age Restrictions

The legal drinking age of 21 years is always observed on-board all ships and proof of age may be required. All on-board... Read more

Dress Code

You should dress for a cruise with Princess the same way you would for any stylish land-based resort.
Casual sportswear, including shorts, lightweight... Read more

Drinks Packages

All Inclusive Beverage Package:
Relax and enjoy the convenience of an all inclusive beverage package featuring any drink up to $10 including cocktails,... Read more

E-Cigarette & Smoking Policies

Keeping the comfort of our guests a priority, and in consideration of consumer studies which show smokers are a small minority of... Read more

Sailing
Cabin
Details
Payment

Choose a sailing to book

Interior
Window
Balcony
Suite
Book with confidence

We know these are uncertain times, but don't fret. All bookings are covered by our Financial Protection Guarantee and we only work with cruise lines that are members of ATOL and ABTA. For more information about cancellation cover, visit the Coronavirus Cancellation Policies page.

How many people will be travelling?


* Passengers should be aged under 18 at the time of embarkation to qualify as a child.
Book with confidence

We know these are uncertain times, but don't fret. All bookings are covered by our Financial Protection Guarantee and we only work with cruise lines that are members of ATOL and ABTA. For more information about cancellation cover, visit the Coronavirus Cancellation Policies page.

How many people will be travelling?


* Passengers should be aged under 18 at the time of embarkation to qualify as a child.
Prices shown are per person based on two people sharing (unless otherwise specfied) in GBP and subject to availability. Certain restrictions can apply. Prices are updated on a daily basis and may vary when continuing through the booking process.