Cunard

7-night Japan (Golden Week)

Queen Elizabeth

Join us on Queen Elizabeth and immerse yourself in her evocative art deco elegance. Our newest Queen exudes style and has an especially refined feel. Prepare yourself for a truly remarkable voyage.

Explore the ship
Itinerary highlights
Yokohama Japan
Kagoshima Japan
Fukuoka Japan
Ship highlights
Photo of the Queen's Grill Queen's Grill
Photo of the Cunard Insights Cunard Insights
Photo of the Book Club Book Club
from
£1,349
per person
from
£193
per night
1 May 2022
£2,649 £1,349
1 May 2022
£2,799 £1,349
1 May 2022
£3,049 £1,599
1 May 2022
£8,499 £3,999
Book from £1,349 Email me this cruise

The itinerary

In 1853, a fleet of four American warships under Commodore Matthew Perry sailed into the bay of Tokyo (then Edo) and presented the reluctant Japanese with the demands of the U.S. government for the opening of diplomatic and commercial relations. The following year Perry returned and first set foot on Japanese soil at Yokohama—then a small fishing village on the mudflats of Tokyo bay. Two years later New York businessman Townsend Harris became America's first diplomatic representative to Japan. In 1858 he was finally able to negotiate a commercial treaty between the two countries; part of the deal designated four locations—one of them Yokohama—as treaty ports. In 1859 the shogunate created a special settlement in Yokohama for the growing community of merchants, traders, missionaries, and other assorted adventurers drawn to this exotic new land of opportunity. The foreigners (predominantly Chinese and British, plus a few French, Americans, and Dutch) were confined here to a guarded compound about 5 square km (2 square miles)—placed, in effect, in isolation—but not for long. Within a few short years the shogunal government collapsed, and Japan began to modernize. Western ideas were welcomed, as were Western goods, and the little treaty port became Japan's principal gateway to the outside world. In 1872 Japan's first railway was built, linking Yokohama and Tokyo. In 1889 Yokohama became a city; by then the population had grown to some 120,000. As the city prospered, so did the international community and by the early 1900s Yokohama was the busiest and most modern center of international trade in all of East Asia. Then Yokohama came tumbling down. On September 1, 1923, the Great Kanto Earthquake devastated the city. The ensuing fires destroyed some 60,000 homes and took more than 40,000 lives. During the six years it took to rebuild the city, many foreign businesses took up quarters elsewhere, primarily in Kobe and Osaka, and did not return. Over the next 20 years Yokohama continued to grow as an industrial center—until May 29, 1945, when in a span of four hours, some 500 American B-29 bombers leveled nearly half the city and left more than half a million people homeless. When the war ended, what remained became—in effect—the center of the Allied occupation. General Douglas MacArthur set up headquarters here, briefly, before moving to Tokyo; the entire port facility and about a quarter of the city remained in the hands of the U.S. military throughout the 1950s. By the 1970s Yokohama was once more rising from the debris; in 1978 it surpassed Osaka as the nation's second-largest city, and the population is now inching up to the 3.5 million mark. Boosted by Japan's postwar economic miracle, Yokohama has extended its urban sprawl north to Tokyo and south to Kamakura—in the process creating a whole new subcenter around the Shinkansen Station at Shin-Yokohama. The development of air travel and the competition from other ports have changed the city's role in Japan's economy. The great liners that once docked at Yokohama's piers are now but a memory, kept alive by a museum ship and the occasional visit of a luxury vessel on a Pacific cruise. Modern Large as Yokohama is, the central area is very negotiable. As with any other port city, much of what it has to offer centers on the waterfront—in this case, on the west side of Tokyo Bay. The downtown area is called Kannai (literally, "within the checkpoint"); this is where the international community was originally confined by the shogunate. Though the center of interest has expanded to include the waterfront and Ishikawa-cho, to the south, Kannai remains the heart of town. Think of that heart as two adjacent areas. One is the old district of Kannai, bounded by Basha-michi on the northwest and Nippon-odori on the southeast, the Keihin Tohoku Line tracks on the southwest, and the waterfront on the northeast. This area contains the business offices of modern Yokohama. The other area extends southeast from Nippon-odori to the Moto-machi shopping street and the International Cemetery, bordered by Yamashita Koen and the waterfront to the northeast; in the center is Chinatown, with Ishikawa-cho Station to the southwest. This is the most interesting part of town for tourists. Whether you're coming from Tokyo, Nagoya, or Kamakura, make Ishikawa-cho Station your starting point. Take the South Exit from the station and head in the direction of the waterfront.

Day 2At Sea

Kagoshima city is the capital of Kagoshima prefecture and also Kyushu’s southernmost major city. This city is often compared to its Italian sister city Naples, due to its’s similarities such as mild climate and active volcano, Sakurajima. Sakurajima is one of the most renowned active volcanos not only in Japan but also in the whole entire world. This smoking Sakurajima is centred in Kinko Bay and is one of the main symbols of this prefecture. We cannot talk about Sakurajima without the history of continuous eruption. Sakurajima used to be an isolated island; however, the land has banded together with Osumi peninsula from the eruption in 1914. You may have a chance to see the smoke coming from the top of Sakurajima depending on the weather condition. Not only does the scenery of Sakurajima represent the beauty of Kagoshima City but Senganen garden is also symbolic to elegance in the Kagoshima region. This Japanese garden was constructed by a feudal lord, Mitsuhisa Shimazu, as a guest house of the Kagoshima castle which attracts many visitors for its splendid view.

White-sand city beaches and hot-spring resorts may not be everyone's first image of Korea, but these are what Koreans flock to Busan for all year. And there are plenty of opportunities for rest, relaxation, retail therapy, and even a touch of glamour every October with the Busan International Film Festival. Busan's beaches are the big summertime draw but there is plenty to be seen year round. Quintessential experiences include taking some rest and relaxation at a local spa and exploring the Beomeosa temple complex.

Nagasaki city has developed into one of the most important port cities in Japan. During Japan’s period of isolation in the 17th century, Nagasaki played a prominent role in foreign trade relation and only a very few ports were open to restricted numbers of foreign traders. Even though Holland was a major country who conducted trading during this period, Dutch people were only allowed to stay in Dejima Island and were not allowed to have contact with the Japanese people. Today, you will still find the strong influence of Dutch and Chinese culture in the city which is very different from all other cities in Japan. In the more recent history, Nagasaki became the second city after Hiroshima to be destroyed by an atomic bomb towards the end of World War II. From the visit to Atomic bomb museum and peace memorial park, people could understand how chaotic the situation was and the agony that the people in the days have experienced from the damage inflicted by the atomic bomb. It continues to appeal to the world with their wish for world peace.

Day 7At Sea

In 1853, a fleet of four American warships under Commodore Matthew Perry sailed into the bay of Tokyo (then Edo) and presented the reluctant Japanese with the demands of the U.S. government for the opening of diplomatic and commercial relations. The following year Perry returned and first set foot on Japanese soil at Yokohama—then a small fishing village on the mudflats of Tokyo bay. Two years later New York businessman Townsend Harris became America's first diplomatic representative to Japan. In 1858 he was finally able to negotiate a commercial treaty between the two countries; part of the deal designated four locations—one of them Yokohama—as treaty ports. In 1859 the shogunate created a special settlement in Yokohama for the growing community of merchants, traders, missionaries, and other assorted adventurers drawn to this exotic new land of opportunity. The foreigners (predominantly Chinese and British, plus a few French, Americans, and Dutch) were confined here to a guarded compound about 5 square km (2 square miles)—placed, in effect, in isolation—but not for long. Within a few short years the shogunal government collapsed, and Japan began to modernize. Western ideas were welcomed, as were Western goods, and the little treaty port became Japan's principal gateway to the outside world. In 1872 Japan's first railway was built, linking Yokohama and Tokyo. In 1889 Yokohama became a city; by then the population had grown to some 120,000. As the city prospered, so did the international community and by the early 1900s Yokohama was the busiest and most modern center of international trade in all of East Asia. Then Yokohama came tumbling down. On September 1, 1923, the Great Kanto Earthquake devastated the city. The ensuing fires destroyed some 60,000 homes and took more than 40,000 lives. During the six years it took to rebuild the city, many foreign businesses took up quarters elsewhere, primarily in Kobe and Osaka, and did not return. Over the next 20 years Yokohama continued to grow as an industrial center—until May 29, 1945, when in a span of four hours, some 500 American B-29 bombers leveled nearly half the city and left more than half a million people homeless. When the war ended, what remained became—in effect—the center of the Allied occupation. General Douglas MacArthur set up headquarters here, briefly, before moving to Tokyo; the entire port facility and about a quarter of the city remained in the hands of the U.S. military throughout the 1950s. By the 1970s Yokohama was once more rising from the debris; in 1978 it surpassed Osaka as the nation's second-largest city, and the population is now inching up to the 3.5 million mark. Boosted by Japan's postwar economic miracle, Yokohama has extended its urban sprawl north to Tokyo and south to Kamakura—in the process creating a whole new subcenter around the Shinkansen Station at Shin-Yokohama. The development of air travel and the competition from other ports have changed the city's role in Japan's economy. The great liners that once docked at Yokohama's piers are now but a memory, kept alive by a museum ship and the occasional visit of a luxury vessel on a Pacific cruise. Modern Large as Yokohama is, the central area is very negotiable. As with any other port city, much of what it has to offer centers on the waterfront—in this case, on the west side of Tokyo Bay. The downtown area is called Kannai (literally, "within the checkpoint"); this is where the international community was originally confined by the shogunate. Though the center of interest has expanded to include the waterfront and Ishikawa-cho, to the south, Kannai remains the heart of town. Think of that heart as two adjacent areas. One is the old district of Kannai, bounded by Basha-michi on the northwest and Nippon-odori on the southeast, the Keihin Tohoku Line tracks on the southwest, and the waterfront on the northeast. This area contains the business offices of modern Yokohama. The other area extends southeast from Nippon-odori to the Moto-machi shopping street and the International Cemetery, bordered by Yamashita Koen and the waterfront to the northeast; in the center is Chinatown, with Ishikawa-cho Station to the southwest. This is the most interesting part of town for tourists. Whether you're coming from Tokyo, Nagoya, or Kamakura, make Ishikawa-cho Station your starting point. Take the South Exit from the station and head in the direction of the waterfront.

The ship Queen Elizabeth

Join us on Queen Elizabeth and immerse yourself in her evocative art deco elegance. Our newest Queen exudes style and has an especially refined feel. Prepare yourself for a truly remarkable voyage.

Capacity
2081
Cabins
1043
Total crew
1005
Length
964m

Food and drink

A range of complimentary and speciality dining restaurants are available, with menus created by Jean-Marie Zimmermann, Cunard’s Global Culinary Ambassador. Tables for 4-8 are typical, with seating allocated prior to cruising. Limited numbers of tables for two are available on request.

Queen's Grill

The Queen's Grill is a luxurious, fine-dining venue reserved exclusively for Queens Grill Suite passengers. The elegant restaurant is open for breakfast,... Read more

Complimentary
Fine

Princess Grill

The Princess Grill offers an intimate, fine dining experience, reserved exclusively for Princess Grill Suite passengers. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner,... Read more

Complimentary
Fine

Britannia & Britannia Club Restaurant

Make a dramatic entrance down the grand staircase into the elegant Britannia two tier dining room and revel in the sumptuous menus... Read more

Complimentary
Fine

The Verandah

The Verandah is Queen Elizabeth's formal alternative dining venue and is your invitation to savour contemporary French cuisine that uses traditional ingredients... Read more

Cover
French

The Lido Restaurant

Should you prefer a club sandwich or a light bite in the afternoon head for the Lido restaurant where buffet dining is... Read more

Cover
Regional

Queen's Room

The elegant tradition of Afternoon Tea is a Cunard signature not to be missed. White-gloved waiters serve delightful cucumber sandwiches, fresh scones... Read more

Complimentary
Classic

Entertainment

Queen Elizabeth provides you with a wealth of engaging experiences to keep you entertained day and night. From spectacular theatrical performances to the excitement of the casino, there's something to keep everyone happy.

Yacht Club

Venture into the Yacht Club in the after hours and dance the night away. Named after the lively QE2 venue, with its... Read more

The Royal Court Theatre

Designed in an elegant opera house style, The Royal Court Theatre showcases classic and modern films during the afternoon, with fantastic live... Read more

Empire Casino

This elegant casino will set your heart racing as you spin the roulette wheel, play the slots or try your hand at... Read more

Galleries

Art connoisseurs can enjoy a choice of three galleries. Cladendon Fine Art features original artwork and lithographs by 20th and 21st century... Read more

Shopping

The ship features a variety of shops for those who enjoy a spot of retail therapy. Passengers can find designer brands in... Read more

Queens Room

The wonderful Queens Room provides the opportunity to foxtrot in the largest ballroom at sea. There is no better place to hone... Read more

Royal Night Theme Balls

Royal night themed balls in the magnificent Queens Room Ballroom are your chance to don your formal dancing attire and take to... Read more

The Commodore Club

Located on deck 10 at the front of the ship, the Commodore Club provides magnificent views across the ocean or your delightful... Read more

The Golden Lion

A Cunard favourite, choose from a wide selection of beer, cider and wine to compliment the delicious gastro pub style menus in... Read more

Cafe Carinthia

Located in a central position on Deck 2, overlooking the Grand Lobby, Cafe Carinthia is the perfect place to sit and relax... Read more

The Garden Lounge

A light and sociable room, inspired by Kew Gardens. Spend a lazy afternoon reading a book or relaxing with a Garden Lounge... Read more

Health and fitness

The ship features a fantastic array of health and fitness facilities for passengers that wish to stay active or relax and be pampered. These include a spa, fitness centre, games deck and sports courts.

Royal Spa

The Royal Spa, takes you on a blissful journey of relaxation, thanks to its range of innovative and indulgent treatments, massages and... Read more

Fitness Centre

Passengers who wish to stay active can make use of the fully equipped gymnasium. As well as state of the art gym... Read more

Games Deck

When the warm weather entices you onto the spacious Games Deck you’ll notice a definite English country garden ambience, with the gentle... Read more

Sports

The ship also offers a wide variety of sports facilities for passengers who want to stay active during their cruise. These fantastic... Read more

Swimming Pools

In warm weather, deck 9 is the place to be with a choice of two inviting swimming pools, The Pavilion and The... Read more

Kids and teens

For younger cruise passengers, there are a number of facilities available to keep them entertained. Running primarily during the school holidays, kids clubs are available for children or teens travelling on Queen Elizabeth.

Night Nursery

Open between 6pm – 11pm, the Night Nursery operates on a first come, first served basis. Providing trained childcare for 12-23 month... Read more

Play Zone

Designed for 2-7's, Play Zone provides a supervised play area for some of Cunard’s youngest passengers. The club features arts and crafts,... Read more

Kids Zone

A supervised play area for 8-12's, Kids Zone provides games, consoles, activities, arts and crafts for kids to enjoy, along with sports... Read more

Teen Zone

Providing a space for teens to relax, 13-17's can take part in team games, deck sports and tennis tournaments. Trained staff also... Read more

Enrichment

Enrichment programs and lectures on contemporary and classical subjects are popular features on Cunard cruises. Queen Elizabeth covers a wide range of activities from ballroom dancing to computing lessons.

Cunard Insights

Explore a number of historical and contemporary issues presented by a wide range of speakers. These can include explorers, academics, former ambassadors... Read more

Book Club

The Cunard Book Club offers the opportunity for thought-provoking literary discussions among guests during each voyage. It is led by the Librarian... Read more

Cunard ConneXions

Cunard ConneXions offers a programme of activities all day every day from watercolour to computer lessons, wine tasting to ballroom dancing as... Read more

Useful info

Special Dietary Requirements

The ship can cater for the following dietary requirements on request: Vegetarian, low /no fat, low salt /no salt, lactose intolerant ,... Read more

Dress Code

During the day casual shirts, shorts, trousers and beachwear are ideal. The main restaurants require a casual dress code for breakfast and... Read more

Disabled Facilites

Fully accessible adapted cabins are available onboard the ship and some suites are also suitable for wheelchair users as the cabin door... Read more

Smoking & E-cigarette Policy

There are dedicated areas on the ship where passengers are permitted to smoke. Smoking is not permitted in any public room, inside... Read more

Age Restrictions

Children older than six months may travel with Cunard, however Transatlantic crossings have a minimum age requirement of 12 months. Guests under... Read more

A world of beauty and wonder

Our commitment to preserving the environment.

Cunard and our parent company Carnival Corporation and plc take our environmental stewardship very seriously and are... Read more

Carnival's 2020 targets

Carbon footprint

Committed to sustainability and environmental protection in the communities it visits, Carnival Corporation and plc has effectively reduced its carbon footprint... Read more

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Prices shown are per person based on two people sharing (unless otherwise specfied) in GBP and subject to availability. Certain restrictions can apply. Prices are updated on a daily basis and may vary when continuing through the booking process.