Celebrity Cruises

14-night Iceland & Ireland Cruise

Celebrity Silhouette

Celebrity Silhouette® is the perfect choice if you enjoy unrivalled relaxation and extraordinary fine dining. The range of dining options onboard has something to tantalise every taste-bud.

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Itinerary highlights
Boats in Southampton Harbour Southampton United Kingdom
Bluebell woods on the island of Guernsey St Peter Port, Guernsey United Kingdom
Blarney Castle, County Cork, Ireland Cork Ireland
Ship highlights
Photo of the Tuscan Grille Tuscan Grille
Photo of the Shore Excursions Shore Excursions
Photo of the Theatre Theatre
from
£2,299
per person
from
£164
per night
Free cancellation up to 30 days before you sail through 30 April 2022
4 Sep 2021
£2,439 £2,299
4 Sep 2021
£2,959 £2,899
4 Sep 2021
£3,059 £2,899
4 Sep 2021
Book from £2,299 Email me this cruise

Cruise with Confidence

Cancel your cruise for free up to 48 hours before your sail date and get a future cruise credit valid for at least 12 months. Applies to any booking made before 31st January 2021.

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The itinerary

Southampton is the UK's largest and busiest cruise port, catering for over 1.5 million passengers every year. Located just a two hour drive out of London, or an 80-minute train journey, Southampton has a rich history on display across the city's museums and cultural venues, as well as leading shopping shopping outlets, many restaurants and bars, and award-winning public parks. Walking around the city centre, you'll see many remnants of the ancient city walls, don't miss the Bargate Monument – a Grade I-listed medieval gatehouse. Further afield, you can take in the sights of nearby cities of Portsmouth and Winchester, or visit the world-renowned heritage site of Stonehenge.

Boats in Southampton Harbour

Cobblestone streets, blooming floral displays, and tiny churches welcome you to this wonderfully pretty harbour. The town of St Peter Port is as pretty as they come, with glowing flower displays painting practically every street corner and window-ledge with colour. As the capital, and main port of Guernsey, St Peter Port puts all of the island’s gorgeous beaches, wonderful history and inspiring stories at your fingertips. Feel the gut punch of the midday gun firing at Castle Cornet, which stands guard over one of the world's prettiest ports. This 800-year-old, Medieval castle offers staggering views of the harbour from its imposing, craggy island location, and you can look out across to the looming shorelines of the other Channel Islands from its weathered battlements. With four well-tended gardens, and five museums offering a rich overview of Guernsey's history, you’ll want to leave a few hours aside to explore the many treasures that lie within the castle’s walls.

Bluebell woods on the island of Guernsey

Cork City received its first charter in 1185 from Prince John of Norman England, and it takes its name from the Irish word corcaigh, meaning "marshy place." The original 6th-century settlement was spread over 13 small islands in the River Lee. Major development occurred during the 17th and 18th centuries with the expansion of the butter trade, and many attractive Georgian-design buildings with wide bowfront windows were constructed during this time. As late as 1770 Cork's present-day main streets—Grand Parade, Patrick Street, and the South Mall—were submerged under the Lee. Around 1800, when the Lee was partially dammed, the river divided into two streams that now flow through the city, leaving the main business and commercial center on an island, not unlike Paris's Île de la Cité. As a result, the city has a number of bridges and quays, which, although initially confusing, add greatly to the port's unique character. Cork can be very "Irish" (hurling, Gaelic football, televised plowing contests, music pubs, and peat smoke). But depending on what part of town you're in, Cork can also be distinctly un-Irish—the sort of place where hippies, gays, and farmers drink at the same pub.

Blarney Castle, County Cork, Ireland

Dublin is making a comeback. The decade-long "Celtic Tiger" boom era was quickly followed by the Great Recession, but The Recovery has finally taken a precarious hold. For visitors, this newer and wiser Dublin has become one of western Europe's most popular and delightful urban destinations. Whether or not you're out to enjoy the old or new Dublin, you'll find it a colossally entertaining city, all the more astonishing considering its intimate size.It is ironic and telling that James Joyce chose Dublin as the setting for his famous Ulysses, Dubliners, and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man because it was a "center of paralysis" where nothing much ever changed. Which only proves that even the greats get it wrong sometimes. Indeed, if Joyce were to return to his once-genteel hometown today—disappointed with the city's provincial outlook, he left it in 1902 at the age of 20—and take a quasi-Homeric odyssey through the city (as he so famously does in Ulysses), would he even recognize Dublin as his "Dear Dirty Dumpling, foostherfather of fingalls and dotthergills"?For instance, what would he make of Temple Bar—the city's erstwhile down-at-the-heels neighborhood, now crammed with cafés and trendy hotels and suffused with a nonstop, international-party atmosphere? Or the simple sophistication of the open-air restaurants of the tiny Italian Quarter (named Quartier Bloom after his own creation), complete with sultry tango lessons? Or of the hot–cool Irishness, where every aspect of Celtic culture results in sold-out theaters, from Once, the cult indie movie and Broadway hit, to Riverdance, the old Irish mass-jig recast as a Las Vegas extravaganza? Plus, the resurrected Joyce might be stirred by the songs of Hozier, fired up by the sultry acting of Michael Fassbender, and moved by the award-winning novels of Colum McCann. As for Ireland's capital, it's packed with elegant shops and hotels, theaters, galleries, coffeehouses, and a stunning variety of new, creative little restaurants can be found on almost every street in Dublin, transforming the provincial city that suffocated Joyce into a place almost as cosmopolitan as the Paris to which he fled. And the locals are a hell of a lot more fun! Now that the economy has finally turned a corner, Dublin citizens can cast a cool eye over the last 20 crazy years. Some argue that the boomtown transformation of their heretofore-tranquil city has permanently affected its spirit and character. These skeptics (skepticism long being a favorite pastime in the capital city) await the outcome of "Dublin: The Sequel," and their greatest fear is the possibility that the tattered old lady on the Liffey has become a little less unique, a little more like everywhere else.Oh ye of little faith: the rare ole gem that is Dublin is far from buried. The fundamentals—the Georgian elegance of Merrion Square, the Norman drama of Christ Church Cathedral, the foamy pint at an atmospheric pub—are still on hand to gratify. Most of all, there are the locals themselves: the nod and grin when you catch their eye on the street, the eagerness to hear half your life story before they tell you all of theirs, and their paradoxically dark but warm sense of humor. It's expected that 2016 will be an extra-special year in the capital, as centenary celebrations of the fateful 1916 Easter Rising will dominate much of the cultural calendar.

Samuel Beckett Bridge in Dublin, Ireland

Although historically a working class city, Glasgow is now home to a thriving arts and cultural community. There are many museums and galleries to choose from, including the recently reopened Kelvingrove Art Gallery & Museum. These, combined with beautifully restored Victorian architecture and the revived River Clyde (which is a nod to the city’s maritime heritage) have set the pace for Glasgow’s heady cultural evolution. Today, the friendly city boasts chic state-of-the-art bars set against down-to-earth pubs, a notoriously brilliant live music scene, and one of the best club scenes in the UK. You will undoubtedly enjoy your time spent in down-to-earth Glasgow… The Glaswegians will make sure of it.

Day 7At sea

Day 8At sea

Akureyri, called the Capital of the North is the second largest urban area in Iceland, and a lively one at that. Hemmed by the 60-km (37-mile) long Eyjafjörður, Akureyri is sheltered from the ocean winds and embraced by mountains on three sides. Late 19th-century wooden houses impart a sense of history, and the twin spires of a modern Lutheran church rising on a green hill near the waterfront, provide a focal point. To the south of Akureyri is the pyramid-shape rhyolite mountain Súlur. Beyond it is Kerling, the highest peak in Eyjafjörður District.

Sprawling Reykjavík, the nation's nerve center and government seat, is home to half the island's population. On a bay overlooked by proud Mt. Esja (pronounced eh-shyuh), with its ever-changing hues, Reykjavík presents a colorful sight, its concrete houses painted in light colors and topped by vibrant red, blue, and green roofs. In contrast to the almost treeless countryside, Reykjavík has many tall, native birches, rowans, and willows, as well as imported aspen, pines, and spruces.Reykjavík's name comes from the Icelandic words for smoke, reykur, and bay, vík. In AD 874, Norseman Ingólfur Arnarson saw Iceland rising out of the misty sea and came ashore at a bay eerily shrouded with plumes of steam from nearby hot springs. Today most of the houses in Reykjavík are heated by near-boiling water from the hot springs. Natural heating avoids air pollution; there's no smoke around. You may notice, however, that the hot water brings a slight sulfur smell to the bathroom.Prices are easily on a par with other major European cities. A practical option is to purchase a Reykjavík City Card at the Tourist Information Center or at the Reykjavík Youth Hostel. This card permits unlimited bus usage and admission to any of the city's seven pools, the Family Park and Zoo, and city museums. The cards are valid for one (ISK 3,300), two (ISK 4,400), or three days (ISK 4,900), and they pay for themselves after three or four uses a day. Even lacking the City Card, paying admission (ISK 500, or ISK 250 for seniors and people with disabilities) to one of the city art museums (Hafnarhús, Kjarvalsstaðir, or Ásmundarsafn) gets you free same-day admission to the other two.

Blue Lagoon Geothermal Spa near Reykjavik, Iceland

Sprawling Reykjavík, the nation's nerve center and government seat, is home to half the island's population. On a bay overlooked by proud Mt. Esja (pronounced eh-shyuh), with its ever-changing hues, Reykjavík presents a colorful sight, its concrete houses painted in light colors and topped by vibrant red, blue, and green roofs. In contrast to the almost treeless countryside, Reykjavík has many tall, native birches, rowans, and willows, as well as imported aspen, pines, and spruces.Reykjavík's name comes from the Icelandic words for smoke, reykur, and bay, vík. In AD 874, Norseman Ingólfur Arnarson saw Iceland rising out of the misty sea and came ashore at a bay eerily shrouded with plumes of steam from nearby hot springs. Today most of the houses in Reykjavík are heated by near-boiling water from the hot springs. Natural heating avoids air pollution; there's no smoke around. You may notice, however, that the hot water brings a slight sulfur smell to the bathroom.Prices are easily on a par with other major European cities. A practical option is to purchase a Reykjavík City Card at the Tourist Information Center or at the Reykjavík Youth Hostel. This card permits unlimited bus usage and admission to any of the city's seven pools, the Family Park and Zoo, and city museums. The cards are valid for one (ISK 3,300), two (ISK 4,400), or three days (ISK 4,900), and they pay for themselves after three or four uses a day. Even lacking the City Card, paying admission (ISK 500, or ISK 250 for seniors and people with disabilities) to one of the city art museums (Hafnarhús, Kjarvalsstaðir, or Ásmundarsafn) gets you free same-day admission to the other two.

Blue Lagoon Geothermal Spa near Reykjavik, Iceland

Day 12At sea

Before English and Scottish settlers arrived in the 1600s, Belfast was a tiny village called Béal Feirste ("sandbank ford") belonging to Ulster's ancient O'Neill clan. With the advent of the Plantation period (when settlers arrived in the 1600s), Sir Arthur Chichester, from Devon in southwestern England, received the city from the English Crown, and his son was made Earl of Donegall. Huguenots fleeing persecution from France settled near here, bringing their valuable linen-work skills. In the 18th century, Belfast underwent a phenomenal expansion—its population doubled every 10 years, despite an ever-present sectarian divide. Although the Anglican gentry despised the Presbyterian artisans—who, in turn, distrusted the native Catholics—Belfast's growth continued at a dizzying speed. The city was a great Victorian success story, an industrial boomtown whose prosperity was built on trade, especially linen and shipbuilding. Famously (or infamously), the Titanic was built here, giving Belfast, for a time, the nickname "Titanic Town." Having laid the foundation stone of the city's university in 1845, Queen Victoria returned to Belfast in 1849 (she is recalled in the names of buildings, streets, bars, monuments, and other places around the city), and in the same year, the university opened under the name Queen's College. Nearly 40 years later, in 1888, Victoria granted Belfast its city charter. Today its population is nearly 300,000, tourist numbers have increased, and this dramatically transformed city is enjoying an unparalleled renaissance.This is all a welcome change from the period when news about Belfast meant reports about "the Troubles." Since the 1994 ceasefire, Northern Ireland's capital city has benefited from major hotel investment, gentrified quaysides (or strands), a sophisticated new performing arts center, and major initiatives to boost tourism. Although the 1996 bombing of offices at Canary Wharf in London disrupted the 1994 peace agreement, the ceasefire was officially reestablished on July 20, 1997, and this embattled city began its quest for a newfound identity.Since 2008, the city has restored all its major public buildings such as museums, churches, theaters, City Hall, Ulster Hall—and even the glorious Crown Bar—spending millions of pounds on its built heritage. A gaol that at the height of the Troubles held some of the most notorious murderers involved in paramilitary violence is now a major visitor attraction.Belfast's city center is made up of three roughly contiguous areas that are easy to navigate on foot. From the south end to the north, it's about an hour's leisurely walk.

City Hall in Belfast, United Kingdom

Day 14At sea

Southampton is the UK's largest and busiest cruise port, catering for over 1.5 million passengers every year. Located just a two hour drive out of London, or an 80-minute train journey, Southampton has a rich history on display across the city's museums and cultural venues, as well as leading shopping shopping outlets, many restaurants and bars, and award-winning public parks. Walking around the city centre, you'll see many remnants of the ancient city walls, don't miss the Bargate Monument – a Grade I-listed medieval gatehouse. Further afield, you can take in the sights of nearby cities of Portsmouth and Winchester, or visit the world-renowned heritage site of Stonehenge.

Boats in Southampton Harbour

The ship Celebrity Silhouette

Celebrity Silhouette® is the perfect choice if you enjoy unrivalled relaxation and extraordinary fine dining. The range of dining options onboard has something to tantalise every taste-bud.

Capacity
2902
Cabins
1451
Total crew
1285
Length
1063m

Food and drink

Offering a variety of seating options. Passengers can chose from traditional, set table seating at 6pm or 8.30pm, or Celebrity Select - the choice to dine any time between 6.30pm – 9pm. Advanced bookings are available as is the option to show up when you like.

Tuscan Grille

Vibrant and flavoursome – just two of the words used to describe Tuscan Grille. In both the menu and the ambience, the... Read more

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Italian

Le Petit Chef at Qsine

Experience the fusion of entertainment and cuisine. We’ve brought the table top to life in a fantastic fusion of entertainment and dining.

Le... Read more

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Fusion

Main Restaurant

A grand stage for fine dining.

This sophisticated restaurant with a wide range of globally-inspired dishes created by a Michelin-starred chef will provide... Read more

Complimentary
Classic

Murano

As timeless as it is modern, the sophisticated ambience of Murano is reflected in the impeccable service and accomplished contemporary take on... Read more

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French

Sushi on Five

Sushi restaurants. Wildly popular from the day it appeared, Sushi on Five satisfies your craving for locally sourced, authentically prepared sushi and... Read more

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Japanese

Lawn Club Grill

Interactive open-air grilling with ocean views.

Experience the thrill of grilling near a lawn of fresh-cut grass while surrounded by an endless view... Read more

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Varies

Luminae at the Retreat

Exclusively reserved for Celebrity's Suite Class.

Exclusive and cutting edge, the globally inspired menus at Luminae are not available in any other restaurant... Read more

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Varies

Blu

Vibrant, crisp and bold flavors, exclusively for AquaClass guests.

Clean, crisp flavors and inventive cuisine meet an extensive list of sustainable and biodynamic... Read more

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Varies

Oceanview Cafe

This café's décor and offerings reflect that of an international marketplace. With a menu influenced by multiple cultures, the cuisine takes diners... Read more
Complimentary
Cafe

Spa Cafe + Juice Bar

Extend Your Spa Experience.

A creative take on healthy cuisine, featuring an eclectic blend of offerings that are both flavorful and good for... Read more

Complimentary
Cafe

The Porch

The freshest seafood & raw bar.

Inspired by the rural seaside charm of the Hamptons, spend a few hours lounging on board at... Read more

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Seafood

Mast Grill

Gourmet food poolside. Enjoy delicious eats while you relax in the sun.
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Bbq

24-hour Room Service

Enjoy Celebrity’s delectable dining delivered right to your stateroom or suite, complimentary and at any time.

Tired from a day of exploring? Whether... Read more

Complimentary
Room

Entertainment

A mixture of contemporary, classic and innovative forms of entertainment can be found onboard. Classic entertainment options include a two-deck library, art gallery, cinema, card room, quizzes and trivia contests. Pool volleyball, lawn games and video games are also on offer.

Theatre

The Main Theatre is the place to sit back and be entertained – the talented Celebrity Cruises entertainment team will dazzle you... Read more

Fortunes Casino

Feeling lucky? Combining the ambience of Monte Carlo and the energy of Las Vegas, Fortunes Casino is a perfect spot to participate... Read more

Passport Bar

Relaxing and inviting, its position right off the Grand Foyer means this may be the first, but not the last, place you... Read more

Craft Social

Craft Social (formerly Cellar Masters), a casual spot featuring more than 40 craft beers (and an expert to guide you through them),... Read more

Sunset Bar

An upgraded Sunset Bar perfect for kicking back, sipping cocktails, and soaking up some of the best views aboard. 

The Retreat Lounge & Sun Deck

The Retreat Sundeck, an exclusive open-air hideaway for suite guests designed by Kelly Hoppen, featuring a bar, hot tub, luxurious new cabanas,... Read more

The Lawn Club

An updated Lawn Club featuring eight refreshed Alcoves, an oversized outdoor movie screen, and a new shaded lounge area complete with banquette... Read more

Celebrity iLounge

This is Celebrity's chic, new approach to the Internet lounge that's also the first Authorised Apple Reseller at Sea. It's the modern... Read more

Art Gallery

Refined culture at sea is what you will experience in Celebrity's inspiring and thought-provoking Art Gallery. Stop in on your way to... Read more

Library

With over 2,000 books on subjects ranging from classic to popular biographies, history to contemporary mysteries. A selection of 1,000 DVDs and... Read more

Health and fitness

Whether you want to clear your mind, fine-tune your body, reinvigorate your spirit – or all of the above – The Spa is an indulgent escape where you can do it all. The Spa introduced an array of innovative new firsts in beauty, fitness and wellness that make finding complete bliss on holiday easier than ever. 

The Spa

Begin your spa journey by selecting from more than 120 treatments for a spa experience unlike anything else at sea. Discover ground-breaking... Read more

Fitness Centre

In the fitness centre you can meet with a personal trainer, take a fitness class, try out the resistance swimming pool or challenge... Read more

Persian Garden

Accompanied by the calming strains of new age music, enjoy the warmth of a relaxing steam or treat your skin to the... Read more

Solarium

Find true poolside serenity at the Solarium. Featuring a gorgeous pool, sparkling waterfalls, thickly padded lounge chairs, and an adults-only policy, tranquillity... Read more

The Retreat Lounge & Sundeck

The Retreat Sundeck, an exclusive open-air hideaway for suite guests designed by Kelly Hoppen, featuring a bar, hot tub, luxurious new cabanas,... Read more

Sports

Practise skills on your own, play with old or new friends, or take part in a tournament with one of the Celebrity... Read more

Kids and teens

Celebrity Cruises offer many unique family-friendly activities, as well as more traditional children’s clubs. Designed for children of all ages and interests, each program is geared towards a specific age group and supervised by an experienced youth staff member.

XClub

Younger cruisers ages 12-17 can cut loose and kick back the way they want in our hip VIP area geared specifically for... Read more

Fun Factory & Ship Mates

Designed exclusively for junior cruisers, Fun Factory is a place where magic happens. Children age 3-11 will thrive in this environment, which... Read more

Largest Xbox Experience at Sea

Dedicated Xbox stations and mobile consoles. Solo, tournament and theme nights for kids, teens and adults. The latest releases, all free to... Read more

iTake

Video project just for teens. From story boarding to filming and editing, prizes are awarded for numerous film category winners at the... Read more

Enrichment

In association with Rosetta Stone and Apple, Celebrity offers an impressive range of educational activities and guest speakers during most of their sailings. Learn how to dance, brush up on your language skills, or take in a unique hot glass show - the first at sea.

Shore Excursions

Satisfy your appetite for adventure, inspiration and wonder. With something for every interest and exertion level, shore excursions∘ on your Celebrity cruise... Read more

Useful info

Disabled Facilities

You may bring and use wheelchairs, mobility scooters and other assistive devices onboard our ships. Due to safety regulations, Segways may not... Read more

Special Dietary Requirements

Celebrity Cruises makes every effort to accommodate guest’s dietary requirements wherever possible. Most dietary needs can be catered for such as:
Vegetarian, Gluten... Read more

Age Restrictions

Drinking:
The minimum drinking age for all alcoholic beverages on all Celebrity Cruises ships is 21 years of age.
However, on ships sailing from... Read more

Dress Code

A Celebrity cruise is a step into luxury, so it’s the perfect opportunity to dress up for dining every evening.
Whether enjoying... Read more

WiFi Access

All Celebrity Millennium® and Celebrity Solstice® Class ships are fully wireless and also have an internet area. Celebrity Xpedition has dial up... Read more

Environment

Lighting

We’re replacing higher wattage halogen and incandescent light bulbs with longer lasting fluorescent and Light Emitting Diode (LED) lights throughout∘ our fleet.... Read more

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We know these are uncertain times, but don't fret. All bookings are covered by our Financial Protection Guarantee and we only work with cruise lines that are members of ATOL and ABTA. For more information about cancellation cover, visit the Coronavirus Cancellation Policies page.

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* Passengers should be aged under 18 at the time of embarkation to qualify as a child.
Prices shown are per person based on two people sharing (unless otherwise specfied) in GBP and subject to availability. Certain restrictions can apply. Prices are updated on a daily basis and may vary when continuing through the booking process.