P&O Cruises

55-night USA And Caribbean

Arcadia

Exclusively for adults, Arcadia offers relaxation in a chic setting, with a classic cruise atmosphere.

Explore the ship
Itinerary highlights
Boats in Southampton Harbour Southampton United Kingdom
Santa Cruz de Tenerife Tenerife
Scarborough Trinidad and Tobago
Ship highlights
Photo of the Meridian Restaurant Meridian Restaurant
Photo of the Dance Classes Dance Classes
Photo of the Library Library
from
£7,603
per person
from
£138
per night
7 Jan 2022
7 Jan 2022
£8,434 £7,603
7 Jan 2022
£10,359 £8,799
7 Jan 2022
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The itinerary

Southampton is the UK's largest and busiest cruise port, catering for over 1.5 million passengers every year. Located just a two hour drive out of London, or an 80-minute train journey, Southampton has a rich history on display across the city's museums and cultural venues, as well as leading shopping shopping outlets, many restaurants and bars, and award-winning public parks. Walking around the city centre, you'll see many remnants of the ancient city walls, don't miss the Bargate Monument – a Grade I-listed medieval gatehouse. Further afield, you can take in the sights of nearby cities of Portsmouth and Winchester, or visit the world-renowned heritage site of Stonehenge.

Boats in Southampton Harbour

Day 2At Sea

Day 3At Sea

Day 4At Sea

The largest of the Canary Islands, Tenerife is a beautiful and scenic island which enjoys year-round sunshine and is dominated by Mount Teide. The mountain range runs through the centre of the island, with fertile valleys on the northern side. In the central part of the range is the gigantic natural crater of the Cañadas del Teide, about 14 miles in diameter. Santa Cruz, the island’s pretty capital, was originally a small fishing village but has now grown into a modern city, and also contains 16th-century civic buildings and ornate private mansions. Near the pier is the Santa Cruz Palmetum, a Botanical Garden covering an area of 29 acres, specialising in palms.

Day 6At Sea

Day 7At Sea

Your next stop will be Cape Verde’s cultural capital, Mindelo. Get along with the locals listening to the real morna in the bars of the old town and sipping the local drink, a sugarcane spirit. This island is also known by its British and Portuguese colonial architecture and pastel-coloured houses, the municipal market and the facades of the old Governor’s Palace.

Day 9At Sea

Day 10At Sea

Day 11At Sea

Day 12At Sea

Day 14At Sea

A hidden metropolis inside of the Amazon Rainforest in Brazil, this city is both modern and exciting, yet untouched by the world beyond the jungle. Visit its historical Rubber Museums or stop by the Park of Mindu and catch glimpse of the endangered Pied Tamarin.

A hidden metropolis inside of the Amazon Rainforest in Brazil, this city is both modern and exciting, yet untouched by the world beyond the jungle. Visit its historical Rubber Museums or stop by the Park of Mindu and catch glimpse of the endangered Pied Tamarin.

Day 17At Sea

The penal colony of Cayenne, commonly known as Devil's Island, was a French penal colony that operated in the 19th and 20th century in the Salvation's Islands of French Guiana. Opened in 1852, the Devil's Island system received convicts from the Prison of St-Laurent-du-Maroni

Day 21At Sea

Together, the islands of Trinidad and Tobago make up a state and as such are an independent member of the British Commonwealth. Located just off the coast of Venezuela, both islands are excellent getaways offering different attractions. While Trinidad pulses with life, the smaller and unspoiled island of Tobago is the place for a restful and relaxing holiday. Most of its appeal lies in the beautiful scenery and the availability of outdoor activities. The tourist area is concentrated on the southwestern end, about six miles from the island’s capital of Scarborough. The recently completed deep water harbor with its new cruise terminal has helped to spruce up the town a bit. Although not warranting an extended visit, Scarborough features interesting Botanic Gardens, a few historical buildings and the well-maintained Fort King George, located above the town. The primary appeal, however, lies without doubt in the great outdoors - swimming, snorkeling, diving, fishing, golfing, playing tennis or simply relaxing on Tobago's glorious beaches.

Bridgetown, the capital of Barbados, is located beside the island’s only natural harbour. The city combines modern and colonial architecture with glorious palm tree-lined beaches and a number of historical attractions. Experience the relaxed culture of the city renowned for its British-style parliament buildings and vibrant beach life, and seek out the Anglican church and the 19th-century Barbados Garrison. Cruise ships dock just north of the city centre at the large Bridgetown Port Cruise Terminal, it's a short taxi ride or 15 minute walk along the boardwalk to reach the centre of Bridgetown.

The typical image of a lush tropical paradise comes to life on the friendly island of St Lucia. Despite its small size – just 27 miles long and 14 miles wide – St Lucia is rich in natural splendour with dense emerald rainforest, banana plantations and orchards of coconut, mango and papaya trees. The twin peaks of Les Pitons, now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, rise dramatically 2,000 feet into the sky and dominate the island. Look out for unusual birds with brilliant plumage such as the St Lucia parrot, see a surprising diversity of exotic flora and enjoy the warm hospitality of the islanders in the small villages and open-air markets. Most cruise ships dock in Pointe Seraphine, around a 20 minute walk into the centre of the capital, Castries. St Lucia is a small, mountainous island, with steep, winding and bumpy roads – any cruise passengers with back and neck problems should take this into consideration.

Day 25At Sea

With its superb beaches, historical attractions and beautiful coral reefs, Antigua provides a host of diversions. It is said that the island contains 365 beaches, one for every day of the year. Antigua maintains its traditional West Indian character, with gingerbread-house style architecture, calypso music and carnival festivities. St John’s has been the administrative capital since the island’s colonisation in 1632, and has been the seat of government since it gained independence in 1981. From the port you can explore the colourful Redcliffe district, with its restored wooden houses, and Heritage Quay with its shopping mall and craft shops. The city has some fine examples of Colonial architecture, including the twin-towered cathedral, built in 1845 and considered one of the finest church buildings in the Caribbean. Cruise ships dock right in the heart of St John's and from the pretty Heritage Quay harbour, passengers can walk into the city with ease.

Mountainous St. Kitts, the first English settlement in the Leeward Islands, crams some stunning scenery into its 65 square miles (168 square km). The fertile, lush island has some fascinating natural and historical attractions: a rain forest replete with waterfalls, thick vines, and secret trails; a central mountain range dominated by the 3,792-foot Mt. Liamuiga, whose crater has long been dormant; and Brimstone Hill, known in the 18th century as the Gibraltar of the West Indies. Cruises to Basseterre will dock in Port Zante in the heart of the city. English with a strong West Indian lilt is spoken here. People are friendly but shy; always ask before you take photographs. Also, be sure to wear wraps or shorts over beach attire when you're in public places.

The island of St Maarten, at just 37 square miles, is the smallest island in the world split between two nations – the Dutch and the French. Philipsburg, the capital of Dutch St. Maarten, is where cruise ships dock on the island. The capital stretches about a mile (1½ km) along an isthmus between Great Bay and the Salt Pond and has five parallel streets. Most of the village's dozens of shops and restaurants are on Front Street, narrow and cobblestone, closest to Great Bay. Wathey Square is in the heart of the village. Directly across from the square are the town hall and the courthouse, in a striking white building with cupola. The structure was built in 1793 and has served as the commander's home, a fire station, a jail, and a post office. The streets surrounding the square are lined with hotels, duty-free shops, restaurants, and cafés. The Captain Hodge Pier, just off the square, is a good spot to view Great Bay and the beach that stretches alongside.

With a backdrop of rolling green hills, Tortola is littered with countless beautiful, secluded coves and stunning white sand beaches. Tortola is a quieter, more laid back island than many of its Caribbean neighbours, so why not take the opportunity to wind down and relax under the palm trees on one of its secluded beaches. If you insist on something a little more high energy, why not snorkel through the shipwreck on Salt Island Bay, where you'll dive past turtles, stingrays and thousands of fish. Alternatively, saddle up and explore the Sage Mountain National Park by horseback.

Day 30At Sea

The least developed of the Caribbean ABC islands (Aruba and Curacao are the others), Bonaire has many good reasons to protect its own extraordinary environment. Bonaires Marine Park, which covers the coral reefs along the islands west coast, has a vast number and variety of fish, and snorkelling and diving amongst these colourful residents is a sheer delight. A more conventional national park spreads across the whole northern part of the island. Originally plantations, this freshwater swampland is now home to pelican, parrots and geese. Pick of the islands beaches is called Pink Beach because of the attractive colour the coral has turned the sand.

Oranjestad, Aruba's capital, is easily explored on foot. Its palm-lined central thoroughfare runs between old and new pastel-painted buildings of typical Dutch design (Spanish influence is also evident in some of the architecture). There are a lot of malls with boutiques and shops—the Renaissance mall carries high-end luxury items and designer fashions. A massive renovation in downtown has given Main Street (a.k.a. Caya G. F. Betico Croes) a whole new lease on life: boutique malls, shops, and restaurants have opened next to well-loved family-run businesses. Stroll along the boardwalk from the city centre to the Palm Beach area of Aruba, filled with resorts, restaurants, nightclubs and more. Cruise ships dock at Aruba Port Authority, around a 10 minute walk from the centre of Oranjestad.

Dutch settlers came here in the 1630s, about the same time they sailed through the Verazzano Narrows to Manhattan, bringing with them original red-tile roofs, first used on the trade ships as ballast and later incorporated into the architecture of Willemstad. Much of the original colonial structures remain, but this historic city is constantly reinventing itself and the government monument foundation is always busy restoring buildings in one urban neighborhood or another. The salty air causes what is called "wall cancer" which causes the ancient abodes to continually crumble over time. The city is cut in two by Santa Anna Bay. On one side is Punda (the point)—crammed with shops, restaurants, monuments, and markets and a new museum retracing its colorful history. And on the other side is Otrobanda (literally meaning the "other side"), with lots of narrow, winding streets and alleyways (called "steekjes" in Dutch), full of private homes notable for their picturesque gables and Dutch-influenced designs.

A colourful street in Willemstad, Curaçao

Day 34At Sea

Cartagena's magnificent city walls and fortresses, now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, enclose a well-restored historic center (the Cuidad Amurallada, or walled city) with plazas, churches, museums, and shops that have made it a lively coastal vacation spot for South Americans and others. New hotels and restaurants make the walled city a desirable place to stay, and the formerly down-at-the-heels Getsemaní neighborhood attracts those seeking a bohemian buzz. The historic center is a small section of Cartagena; many hotels are in the Bocagrande district, an elongated peninsula where high-rise hotels overlook a long, gray-sand beach.When it was founded in 1533 by Spanish conquistador Pedro de Heredia, Cartagena was the only port on the South American mainland. Gold and silver looted from indigenous peoples passed through here en route to Spain and attracted pirates, including Sir Francis Drake, who in 1586 torched 200 buildings. Cartagena's walls protected the city's riches as well as the New World's most important African slave market.

The provincial capital of Colón, beside the canal's Atlantic entrance, is named for the Spanish-language surname of Christopher Columbus, though the Americans called it Aspinwall in the 19th century.. The city was founded in 1850 by Americans working on the Panama railroad and named Aspinwall for one of the railway engineers. Following completion in 1855, Colon gained in importance, which was furthered by the plans for an isthmian canal. During the time of the French canal attempt, a fire in 1885 burned the city nearly to the ground and left thousands of people homeless. Colon was rebuilt in the architectural style then popular in France. Buildings from that era plus the ones constructed by Americans between 1904 and 1914 are still in use today, although the majority is on the verge of collapse. In addition to its importance as a port, Colon boasts the world’s second largest duty-free zone, known as Zona Libre, which is contained in a huge fortress like, walled-off area with giant international stores. However, most of the merchandise is sold in bulk to commercial businesses throughout the country.

Christopher Columbus became Costa Rica's first tourist when he landed on this stretch of coast in 1502 during his fourth and final voyage to the New World. Expecting to find vast mineral wealth, he named the region Costa Rica ("rich coast"). Imagine the Spaniards' surprise eventually to find there was none. Save for a brief skirmish some six decades ago, the country did prove itself rich in a long tradition of peace and democracy. No other country in Latin America can make that claim. Costa Rica is also abundantly rich in natural beauty, managing to pack beaches, volcanoes, rain forests, and diverse animal life into an area the size of Vermont and New Hampshire combined. It has successfully parlayed those qualities into its role as one the world's great ecotourism destinations. A day visit is short, but time enough for a quick sample.

Day 38At Sea

Experience true Caribbean island bliss, during your time on the immaculate paradise of Roatán, which is the largest of Honduras' Bay Islands. This slim island is framed by glorious powdery white beaches, and rich ocean beds carpeted with diverse coral reefs - alive with fish and marine life. Curious dolphins roll through the waves just offshore, while beach dwellers soak up the sun, and enjoy coconut cocktails, beside leaning palm trees. The beaches here are nothing short of dreamy - with wooden piers teetering out over the water, and thatched roofs providing welcome shade, as you dangle your legs towards the water. Cruise ships dock in Coxen Hole, the largest city on the island.

Costa Maya is a hidden paradise of the Mexican Caribbean coast, perhaps most famous for the largest collection of Mayan ruins discovered to date. Chacchoben, just one hour away from the port, is the best jumping off point to begin exploring the ruins and learning about the incredible history of the Mayan people. The area is also home to one of the largest reef systems in the world, the Meso-American reef – a perfect opportunity to go diving and snorkeling to see the marine life up close, or why not enjoy the experience on a glass bottom boat ride. For something more relaxing, you can head to the fishing village of Mahahual where beautiful white sand beaches, trendy shopping and traditional Mexican cuisine are awaiting your arrival.

A beach in Costa Maya, Mexico

It's rare to find such stunning natural beauty, glass-clear aquamarine seas, and vast marine life combined with top-flight visitor services and accommodations, and as a result Cozumel's devotees are legion. Divers sharing stories of lionfish and sharks sit table-to-table with families tanned from a day at the beach club, while Mexican couples spin and step to salsa music in the central plaza. There's plenty to explore off the beaten track – deserted, windswept beaches, wild and vibrant natural parks, and 600 miles of coral reef are all yours for the discovering. Just 19 km (12 miles) off the coast, Cozumel is 53 km (33 miles) long and 15 km (9 miles) wide, making it the country's third-largest island.

Day 42At Sea

Freeport is the tourist centre on Grand Bahama Island. With surroundings filled with beautiful sights and opportunities for exciting activities, Freeport should have something of interest for most visitors. Most notable attractions of the area include the Garden of the Groves, a 12-acre botanical garden, and Port Lacuya Marketplace.

Day 44At Sea

Day 45At Sea

With a permanent resident population of 1,500 households, Hamilton doesn't qualify as a major metropolis. Yet it has enough stores, restaurants, and offices to amp up the island’s energy level. Moreover, it has a thriving international business community (centered on financial and investment services, insurance, telecommunications, global management of intellectual property, shipping, and aircraft and ship registration), which lends it a degree of sophistication seldom found in so small a center. The central parishes cover the large area of Paget, Warwick, and Devonshire. These parishes are much sleepier than Hamilton and provide great nature and beach respites when you tire of city life. Convenient bus and ferry connections connect the parishes, so trips outside of Hamilton are easy and a fun way to get off the tourist track.

With a permanent resident population of 1,500 households, Hamilton doesn't qualify as a major metropolis. Yet it has enough stores, restaurants, and offices to amp up the island’s energy level. Moreover, it has a thriving international business community (centered on financial and investment services, insurance, telecommunications, global management of intellectual property, shipping, and aircraft and ship registration), which lends it a degree of sophistication seldom found in so small a center. The central parishes cover the large area of Paget, Warwick, and Devonshire. These parishes are much sleepier than Hamilton and provide great nature and beach respites when you tire of city life. Convenient bus and ferry connections connect the parishes, so trips outside of Hamilton are easy and a fun way to get off the tourist track.

Day 48At Sea

Day 49At Sea

Day 50At Sea

Day 51At Sea

Day 53At Sea

Day 54At Sea

Day 55At Sea

Southampton is the UK's largest and busiest cruise port, catering for over 1.5 million passengers every year. Located just a two hour drive out of London, or an 80-minute train journey, Southampton has a rich history on display across the city's museums and cultural venues, as well as leading shopping shopping outlets, many restaurants and bars, and award-winning public parks. Walking around the city centre, you'll see many remnants of the ancient city walls, don't miss the Bargate Monument – a Grade I-listed medieval gatehouse. Further afield, you can take in the sights of nearby cities of Portsmouth and Winchester, or visit the world-renowned heritage site of Stonehenge.

Boats in Southampton Harbour

The ship Arcadia

Exclusively for adults, Arcadia offers relaxation in a chic setting, with a classic cruise atmosphere.

Capacity
2094
Cabins
952
Total crew
866
Length
935m

Food and drink

The ship features two speciality restaurants, a grand two-tier main dining room and a host of café’s and snack bars. From elegant fine dining to self-service buffets, there's a wide choice of flexible, casual and club dining options to suit everyone.

Meridian Restaurant

Featuring a galleried layout and refined décor, every night will be an occasion in the Meridian Restaurant.

At the stern end of F... Read more

Complimentary
Classic

Cafe Vivo

Just a few steps away from Arcadia's shops, this fantastic coffee shop is a great place to take a break and people... Read more

Cover
Cafe

Neptune Grill

For casual dining at its best, stop by the Neptune Grill, midships on the starboard side of Lido Deck.

Serving snacks, refreshments and... Read more

Cafe

Belvedere Restaurant

For flexible dining at any time, visit The Belvedere Restaurant, midships on Lido Deck.

So named because it commands fine views through floor-to-ceiling... Read more

Complimentary
Varies

The Ocean Grill

In Marco Pierre White's Ocean Grill you can look forward to all kinds of culinary delights.

From Baked Portobello Mushroom with Spinach Leaf... Read more

Cover
Gourmet

Sindhu Restaurant

Experience a taste of India in the Sindhu Restaurant.

The restaurant is located at the top of Arcadia on Sky Deck, adjacent to... Read more

Cover
Indian

Entertainment

There's never a dull moment...

P&O Cruises offers the very best in cruise entertainment. Days can be filled with as much or as little as you want, whilst evenings are no doubt the social highlight. When the sun goes down your ship begins to come alive with the hum of conversation and music, and you can be sure of a memorable night.

Piano Bar

The intimate Piano Bar provides the perfect atmosphere to relax with a drink and enjoy some beautiful music. With performances from the... Read more

The Palladium

This impressive three tier theatre, is located at the very forward end of the ship. Comfortable theatre-style-seating arcs around the stage in... Read more

The Crow's Nest

This relaxed lounge offers sweeping panoramic ocean views and a convivial atmosphere. By day passengers can sit back and relax with a... Read more

Monte Carlo Casino

The Monte Carlo Casino it a great place to continue a fun night out after post dinner drinks or a show. It... Read more

The Globe

With its shining black marble bar, sparkling starlights and glamorous décor, The Globe certainly provides the perfect atmosphere to relax in style.... Read more

The Screening Room

This 30-seat boutique cinema is Arcadia's dedicated space for showing films on board. It offers a variety of classic British films, family... Read more

Atrium

With numerous bars and venues emanating from it, the Atrium has a wonderfully contemporary feel. It boasts a dramatic shimmering two-tone curtain... Read more

Intermezzo

For a particularly special evening, luxuriate in Intermezzo with a glass of champagne or your favourite cocktail. The classy and modern hangout,... Read more

Spinnaker Bar

The large windows of the yacht-inspired Spinnaker Bar allow natural light to fill the room, showcasing its sophisticated, contemporary décor. Its the... Read more

The Rising Sun

If you thought the British Victorian style pub was a thing of the past, you'll be pleased to know it lives on... Read more

East Bar

With stunning views out to the ocean beyond, the colonial style East Bar is the perfect place to relax. As the sun... Read more

The Viceroy Room

The Viceroy Room has a timeless gentleman's club feel. This restful space is designed for peace, reflection, and quiet conversation. Chat with... Read more

Neptune Bar

Decorative ceramic pebbles cover the bar surround, giving you the feel of a pebble beach come rain or shine. But, as the... Read more

Aquarius Bar

This full-service, outdoor bar is bamboo clad and lends a tropical feel to the Aquarius Pool area. Enjoy a brief respite from... Read more

Health and fitness

From the revitalising hydrotherapy pool, to the state of the art gymnasium, there's plenty of facilities onboard to refresh your mind, body and soul. Passengers can enjoy luxury massages and treatments in the Oasis Spa, or head out to the top deck sports court for a spot of tennis.

Oasis Spa

With superb ocean views and relaxing cream décor, the tranquil Oasis Spa is the perfect place to relax and be pampered. In... Read more

The Retreat

The Retreat, is a room designed to be 'zen' - the ultimate space for relaxation. This light and airy room, with comfy... Read more

Sports Court

Whether you enjoy the friendly competition of an organised tournament or prefer to play casually with your own party, short tennis, football,... Read more

Gymnasium

Passengers can watch the waves as they work out with all the latest equipment, including exercise bikes, rowing machines, running machines, steppers,... Read more

Salon

The fully equipped salon is the perfect place for those who want to look their best. Located in the spa, passengers can... Read more

Swimming Pools

Neptune Pool- Covered by a skydome, you can always take to the water no matter what the weather. Located on Lido Deck, between the... Read more

Kids and teens

As an adult only ship, Arcadia does not feature any Kids & Teens facilities.

Enrichment

The ship's fantastic New Horizons programme offers to passengers the chance to leave their cruise with a new hobby, skill or passion. With classes ranging from cookery, and ballroom dancing, to feng shui and tai chi, passengers can search for true enlightenment.

Dance Classes

There are coupled dance instructors onboard who offer a variety of dance lessons. The main types of dance offered are ballroom and... Read more

Library

The ship's well-stocked library is perfect for finding a great book to enjoy by the pool. Choose from an extensive range of... Read more

Useful info

Special Dietary Requirements

The ship can cater for the following diets; vegetarian, low /no fat, low salt /no salt, lactose intolerant /dairy free, gluten /wheat... Read more

Disabled Facilites

Fully accessible adapted cabins and suites are available, which are suitable for wheelchair / mobility scooter users. Passengers with a disability which... Read more

Age Restrictions

As with UK laws, the age limit for purchase and consumption of alcohol on board is 18 years of age, however, when... Read more

Dress Code

The ship operates three styles of dress code: Smart, Evening Casual and Black Tie.

On Smart evenings ladies typically wear tailored trousers and... Read more

Smoking & E-cigarette Policy

There are dedicated areas onboard where smoking is permitted. Smoking is not permitted in any public room, inside cabin or on cabin... Read more

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* Passengers should be aged under 18 at the time of embarkation to qualify as a child.
Prices shown are per person based on two people sharing (unless otherwise specfied) in GBP and subject to availability. Certain restrictions can apply. Prices are updated on a daily basis and may vary when continuing through the booking process.