Princess Cruises

24-night Grand Mediterranean Connoisseur

Pacific Princess

If there’s an ocean, then this intimate cruise ship can take you there! She is one of the Small Ships of Princess, reserved for sailing some of the most exotic destinations in the world.

Explore the ship
Itinerary highlights
Venice Italy
Dubrovnik Croatia
Athens Greece
Ship highlights
Photo of the Traditional- Club Restaurant Traditional- Club Restaurant
Photo of the Cabaret Lounge Cabaret Lounge
from
£4,260
per person
from
£178
per night
Free cancellation up to 30 days before you sail through 30 April 2021
27 Aug 2021
£4,299
27 Aug 2021
£4,499
27 Aug 2021
£4,260
27 Aug 2021
£6,099
Book from £4,260 Email me this cruise

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Cancel your cruise for free up to 30 days before your sail date and get a future cruise credit in the amount of non-refundable fees (the remainder will be refunded to you). Applies to sailings departing through 30 April 2021.

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The itinerary

Venice is a city unlike any other. No matter how often you've seen it in photos and films, the real thing is more dreamlike than you could imagine. With canals where streets should be, water shimmers everywhere. The fabulous palaces and churches reflect centuries of history in what was a wealthy trading centre between Europe and the Orient. Getting lost in the narrow alleyways is a quintessential part of exploring Venice, but at some point you'll almost surely end up in Piazza San Marco, where tourists and locals congregate for a coffee or an aperitif. The city has had a complicated history with the cruise industry, an increasing number of activists are calling for ships to be banned from docking in Venice. Cruise ships dock in several terminals at Stazione Marittima, which is to the west of the city.

Venice is a city unlike any other. No matter how often you've seen it in photos and films, the real thing is more dreamlike than you could imagine. With canals where streets should be, water shimmers everywhere. The fabulous palaces and churches reflect centuries of history in what was a wealthy trading centre between Europe and the Orient. Getting lost in the narrow alleyways is a quintessential part of exploring Venice, but at some point you'll almost surely end up in Piazza San Marco, where tourists and locals congregate for a coffee or an aperitif. The city has had a complicated history with the cruise industry, an increasing number of activists are calling for ships to be banned from docking in Venice. Cruise ships dock in several terminals at Stazione Marittima, which is to the west of the city.

Nothing can prepare you for your first sight of Dubrovnik. Lying 216 km (135 miles) southeast of Split and commanding a jaw-dropping coastal location, it is one of the world's most beautiful fortified cities. Its massive stone ramparts and fortress towers curve around a tiny harbor, enclosing graduated ridges of sun-bleached orange-tiled roofs, copper domes, and elegant bell towers. Your imagination will run wild picturing what it looked like seven centuries ago when the walls were built, without any suburbs or highways around it, just this magnificent stone city rising out of the sea. During the 20th century, as part of Yugoslavia, the city became a popular tourist destination, and in 1979 it was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. During the war for independence, it came under heavy siege. Thanks to careful restoration, few traces of damage remain; however, there are maps inside the Pile and Ploče Gates illustrating the points around the city where damage was done. It’s only when you experience Dubrovnik yourself that you can understand what a treasure the world nearly lost.

Day 4At Sea

Athens is the birthplace of the modern western world, home to magnificent wonders including the Parthenon, the Acropolis, the Temples of Olympian Zeus and Athena Nike, and the most impressive collection of ancient artefacts at the Archaeological Museum. Athens effortlessly blends its ancient historic landmarks with a youthful, modern energy with chic rooftop bars, eclectic shopping destinations and a bustling art scene. Piraeus is the gateway to Athens for cruise visitors, which is easily accessible by public transport.

Put firmly on the map by Jackie O in the 1960s, Mykonos remains the Saint-Tropez of the Greek islands. The scenery is memorable, with its whitewashed streets, Little Venice, the Kato Myli ridge of windmills, and Kastro, the town's medieval quarter. Its cubical two- or three-story houses and churches, with their red or blue doors and domes and wooden balconies, have been long celebrated as some of the best examples of classic Cycladic architecture. Pink oleander, scarlet hibiscus, and trailing green pepper trees form a contrast amid the dazzling whiteness, whose frequent renewal with whitewash is required by law. Any visitor who has the pleasure of getting lost in its narrow streets (made all the narrower by the many outdoor stone staircases, which maximise housing space in the crowded village) will appreciate how its confusing layout was designed to foil pirates—if it was designed at all. Most cruise ships dock in nearby Tourlos, around one mile outside of Mykonos Town. Some ships will anchor at sea and tender their passengers direct to Mykonos Town.

Whilst the busy resort town of Kusadasi offers much in the way of shopping and dining – not to mention a flourishing beach life scene, the real jewel here is Ephesus and the stunning ruined city that really take centre stage. With only 20% of the classical ruins having been excavated, this archaeological wonder has already gained the status as Europe’s most complete classical metropolis. And a metropolis it really is; built in the 10th century BC this UNESCO World Heritage site is nothing short of spectacular. Although regrettably very little remains of the Temple of Artemis (one of the seven wonders of the ancient world), the superb Library of Celsus’ façade is practically intact and it is one of life’s great joys to attend an evening performance in the illuminated ruins once all the tourists have left. The history of the city is fascinating and multi-layered and it is well worth reading up on this beforehand if a visit is planned. Another point of interest for historians would be the house of the Virgin Mary, located on the romantically named Mount Nightingale and just nine kilometres away from Ephesus proper. Legend has it that Mary (along with St. John) spent her final years here, secluded from the rest of the population, spreading Christianity. An edifying experience, even for non-believers. For the less historical minded amongst you, Kusadasi offers plenty in the way of activities. After a stroll through the town, jump in a taxi to Ladies’ Beach (men are allowed), sample a Turkish kebap on one of the many beachfront restaurants and enjoy the clement weather. If you do want to venture further afield, then the crystal clear beaches of Guzelcamli (or the Millipark), the cave of Zeus and the white scalloped natural pools at Pamukkale, known as Cleopatra’s pools, are definitely worth a visit.

Ayios Nikolaos is clustered on a peninsula alongside the gulf of Mirabello, a dramatic composition of bare mountains, islets, and deep blue sea. Behind the crowded harbor lies a natural curiosity, tiny lake Voulismeni, linked to the sea by a narrow channel. Hilly, with narrow, steep streets that provide sea views, the town is a welcoming and animated place, far more pleasant than Mallia and the other resort centers in this part of Crete: you can stroll miles of waterside promenades, cafés line the lakeshore, and many streets are open only to pedestrians. Ayios Nikolaos and the nearby Elounda peninsula provide an excellent base for exploring eastern Crete.

Sunset over the island of Crete, Greece

Undoubtedly the most extraordinary island in the Aegean, crescent-shape Santorini remains a mandatory stop on the Cycladic tourist route—even if it's necessary to enjoy the sensational sunsets from Ia, the fascinating excavations, and the dazzling white towns with a million other travellers. Fira, the capital of the island, is a busy city packed with shops, museums, bars, tavernas, resorts, and nightclubs. Cruise ships anchor at sea and tender their passengers to the base of the Caldera Cliffs in Fira – warning: it's a steep walk up, many opt for the cable car instead!

The iconic blue domes of Santorini Island, Greece

Day 10At Sea

Perched above the blue Tyrrhenian Sea, Sorrento has been a destination for travelers and pleasure seekers since the days of the Roman Empire. To the north stand the ruins of the ancient city of Pompeii, buried in 79 A.D. by an eruption of Mt. Vesuvius. To the south lies the fabled Amalfi Coast and the fishing village of Positano. Offshore, the romantic island of Capri awaits. And then there is Sorrento itself. Stroll through village streets lined with flowers or visit the imposing Duomo and its 13th-century cloister. Cafés and boutiques abound to charm the most experienced traveler. In addition to its considerable charms, Sorrento is a gateway to the wonders of Capri, the ruins of Pompeii and the beauties of the Amalfi Coast. Note: Sorrento is an anchorage port. Passengers transfer to shore via ship's tender.

Civitavecchia is the cruise gateway to Rome. Italy's vibrant capital lives in the present, but no other city on earth evokes its past so powerfully. For over 2,500 years, emperors, popes, artists, and common citizens have left their mark here. Archaeological remains from ancient Rome, art-stuffed churches, and the treasures of Vatican City vie for your attention, but Rome is also a wonderful place to practice the Italian-perfected il dolce far niente, the sweet art of idleness. Your most memorable experiences may include sitting at a caffè in the Campo de' Fiori or strolling in a beguiling piazza.

One of the most photographed villages along the coast, with a decidedly romantic and affluent aura, Portofino has long been a popular destination for the rich and famous. Once an ancient Roman colony and taken by the Republic of Genoa in 1229, it’s also been ruled by the French, English, Spanish, and Austrians, as well as by marauding bands of 16th-century pirates. Elite British tourists first flocked to the lush harbor in the mid-1800s. Some of Europe's wealthiest drop anchor in Portofino in summer, but they stay out of sight by day, appearing in the evening after buses and boats have carried off the day-trippers.There's not actually much to do in Portofino other than stroll around the wee harbor, see the castle, walk to Punta del Capo, browse at the pricey boutiques, and sip a coffee while people-watching. However, weaving through picture-perfect cliffside gardens and gazing at yachts framed by the sapphire Ligurian Sea and the cliffs of Santa Margherita can make for quite a relaxing afternoon. There are also several tame, photo-friendly hikes into the hills to nearby villages.Unless you're traveling on a deluxe budget, you may want to stay in Camogli or Santa Margherita Ligure rather than at one of Portofino's few very expensive hotels. Restaurants and cafés are good but also pricey (don't expect to have a beer here for much under €10).

Portofino, Italy

On one of the best stretches of the Mediterranean, this classic luxury destination is one of the most sought-after addresses in the world. With all the high-rise towers you have to look hard to find the Belle Époque grace of yesteryear. But if you head to the town's great 1864 landmark Hôtel de Paris—still a veritable crossroads of the buffed and befurred Euro-gentry—or enjoy a grand bouffe at its famous Louis XV restaurant, or attend the opera, or visit the ballrooms of the casino, you may still be able to conjure up Monaco's elegant past. Prince Albert II, a political science graduate from Amherst College, traces his ancestry to Otto Canella, who was born in 1070. The Grimaldi dynasty began with Otto's great-great-great-grandson, Francesco Grimaldi, also known as Frank the Rogue. Expelled from Genoa, Frank and his cronies disguised themselves as monks and in 1297 seized the fortified medieval town known today as Le Rocher (the Rock). Except for a short break under Napoléon, the Grimaldis have been here ever since, which makes them the oldest reigning family in Europe. In the 1850s a Grimaldi named Charles III made a decision that turned the Rock into a giant blue chip. Needing revenue but not wanting to impose additional taxes on his subjects, he contracted with a company to open a gambling facility. The first spin of the roulette wheel was on December 14, 1856. There was no easy way to reach Monaco then—no carriage roads or railroads—so no one came. Between March 15 and March 20, 1857, one person entered the casino—and won two francs. In 1868, however, the railroad reached Monaco, and it was filled with Englishmen who came to escape the London fog. The effects were immediate. Profits were so great that Charles eventually abolished all direct taxes. Almost overnight, a threadbare principality became an elegant watering hole for European society. Dukes (and their mistresses) and duchesses (and their gigolos) danced and dined their way through a world of spinning roulette wheels and bubbling champagne—preening themselves for nights at the opera, where such artists as Vaslav Nijinsky, Sarah Bernhardt, and Enrico Caruso came to perform. Along with the tax system, its sensational position on a broad, steep peninsula that bulges into the Mediterranean—its harbor sparkling with luxury cruisers, its posh mansions angling awnings toward the nearly perpetual sun—continues to draw the rich and famous. One of the latest French celebrities to declare himself "Monégasque," thus giving up his French passport, is superchef Alain Ducasse, who said that he made the choice out of affection for Monaco rather than tax reasons. Pleasure boats vie with luxury cruisers in their brash beauty and Titanic scale, and teams of handsome young men—themselves dyed blond and tanned to match—scour and polish every gleaming surface. As you might expect, all this glitz doesn't come cheap. Eating is expensive, and even the most modest hotels cost more here than in nearby Nice or Menton. As for taxis, they don't even have meters so you are completely at the driver's mercy (with prices skyrocketing during events such as the Grand Prix). For the frugal, Monaco is the ultimate day-trip, although parking is as coveted as a room with a view. At the very least you can afford a coffee at Starbucks. The harbor district, known as La Condamine, connects the new quarter, officially known as Monte Carlo with Monaco-Ville (or Le Rocher), a medieval town on the Rock, topped by the palace, the cathedral, and the Oceanography Museum. Have no fear that you'll need to climb countless steps to get to Monaco-Ville, as there are plenty of elevators and escalators climbing the steep cliffs. But shuttling between the lovely casino grounds of Monte Carlo and Old Monaco, separated by a vast port, is a daunting proposition for ordinary mortals without wings, so hop on the No. 1 bus from Saint Roman, or No. 2 from the Jardin Exotique - Both stop at Place du Casino and come up to Monaco Ville.

Day 16At Sea

The medieval cliff-hanging town of Taormina is overrun with tourists, yet its natural beauty is still hard to dispute. The view of the sea and Mt. Etna from its jagged cactus-covered cliffs is as close to perfection as a panorama can get—especially on clear days, when the snowcapped volcano's white puffs of smoke rise against the blue sky. Writers have extolled Taormina's beauty almost since it was founded in the 6th century BC by Greeks from nearby Naxos; Goethe and D. H. Lawrence were among its well-known enthusiasts. The town's boutique-lined main streets get old pretty quickly, but the many hiking paths that wind through the beautiful hills surrounding Taormina promise a timeless alternative. A trip up to stunning Castelmola (whether on foot or by car) should also be on your itinerary.

Cefalú, Taormina, Italy

Valletta, Malta's capital, has ornate palaces and museums protected by massive fortifications of honey-colour limestone. The main entrance to town is through the City Gate (where all bus routes end), which leads onto Triq Repubblika (Republic Street), the spine of the grid-pattern city and the main shopping street. Triq Mercante (Merchant Street) parallels Repubblika to the east and is also good for strolling. From these two streets, cross streets descend toward the water; some are stepped. Valletta's compactness makes it ideal to explore on foot. Cruise ships dock in the Valletta Waterfront, a short distance from the centre of the city – however, the route is uphill, so bare in mind if you're going to walk from the ship.

Valletta, Malta viewed from the Mediterranean Sea

Day 19At Sea

Backed by imposing mountains, tiny Kotor lies hidden from the open sea, tucked into the deepest channel of the Bokor Kotorska (Kotor Bay), which is Europe's most southerly fjord. Kotor's medieval Stari Grad (Old Town) is enclosed within well-preserved defensive walls built between the 9th and 18th centuries and is presided over by a proud hilltop fortress. Within the walls, a labyrinth of winding cobbled streets leads through a series of splendid paved piazzas, rimmed by centuries-old stone buildings. The squares are now haunted by strains from buskers but although many now house trendy cafés and chic boutiques, directions are still given medieval-style by reference to the town’s landmark churches. Kotor has a cruise terminal in the heart of the city that can accommodate medium-sized ships. Most larger ships anchor at sea and tender their passengers over to the harbour.

Split's ancient core is so spectacular and unusual that a visit is more than worth your time. The heart of the city lies within the walls of Roman emperor Diocletian's retirement palace, which was built in the 3rd century AD. Diocletian, born in the nearby Roman settlement of Salona in AD 245, achieved a brilliant career as a soldier and became emperor at the age of 40. In 295 he ordered this vast palace to be built in his native Dalmatia, and when it was completed he stepped down from the throne and retired to his beloved homeland. Upon his death, he was laid to rest in an octagonal mausoleum, around which Split's magnificent cathedral was built.In 615, when Salona was sacked by barbarian tribes, those fortunate enough to escape found refuge within the stout palace walls and divided up the vast imperial apartments into more modest living quarters. Thus, the palace developed into an urban center, and by the 11th century the settlement had expanded beyond the ancient walls.Under the rule of Venice (1420–1797), Split—as a gateway to the Balkan interior—became one of the Adriatic's main trading ports, and the city's splendid Renaissance palaces bear witness to the affluence of those times. When the Habsburgs took control during the 19th century, an overland connection to Central Europe was established by the construction of the Split–Zagreb–Vienna railway line.After World War II, the Tito years saw a period of rapid urban expansion: industrialization accelerated and the suburbs extended to accommodate high-rise apartment blocks. Today the historic center of Split is included on UNESCO's list of World Heritage Sites.

Water is the essence of Kvarner, and the region's largest city expresses this simply. Whether in Croatian or Italian (Fiume) the translation of the name to English is the same: river. Although the history of Croatia's third city goes back to the days of Imperial Rome, modern Rijeka evolved under the rule of Austria-Hungary. The historic core retains vestiges of the old Habsburg monarchy from the time when Rijeka served as the empire's outlet to the Adriatic. During the 1960s, under Yugoslavia, the suburbs expanded rapidly. Rijeka is the country's largest port, with a huge shipyard, massive dry-dock facilities, refineries, and other heavy industries offering large-scale employment. Since the breakup of Yugoslavia, however, Rijeka's role as a shipping town has declined significantly. Much business shifted north to the smaller Slovene ports during the crippling wars of the 1990s, and although some has returned, the volume remains less than half that seen in 1980.

The town of Rijeka, Croatia from above

Today a port town surrounded by industrial suburbs, Koper nevertheless warrants a visit. The Republic of Venice made Koper the regional capital during the 15th and 16th centuries, and the magnificent architecture of the Old Town bears witness to the spirit of those times.The most important buildings are clustered around Titov trg, the central town square. Here stands the Cathedral, which can be visited daily from 7 to noon and 3 to 7, with its fine Venetian Gothic facade and bell tower dating back to 1664. Across the square the splendid Praetor's Palace, formerly the seat of the Venetian Grand Council, combines Gothic and Renaissance styles. From the west side of Titov trg, the narrow, cobbled Kidriceva ulica brings you down to the seafront.

Venice is a city unlike any other. No matter how often you've seen it in photos and films, the real thing is more dreamlike than you could imagine. With canals where streets should be, water shimmers everywhere. The fabulous palaces and churches reflect centuries of history in what was a wealthy trading centre between Europe and the Orient. Getting lost in the narrow alleyways is a quintessential part of exploring Venice, but at some point you'll almost surely end up in Piazza San Marco, where tourists and locals congregate for a coffee or an aperitif. The city has had a complicated history with the cruise industry, an increasing number of activists are calling for ships to be banned from docking in Venice. Cruise ships dock in several terminals at Stazione Marittima, which is to the west of the city.

Venice is a city unlike any other. No matter how often you've seen it in photos and films, the real thing is more dreamlike than you could imagine. With canals where streets should be, water shimmers everywhere. The fabulous palaces and churches reflect centuries of history in what was a wealthy trading centre between Europe and the Orient. Getting lost in the narrow alleyways is a quintessential part of exploring Venice, but at some point you'll almost surely end up in Piazza San Marco, where tourists and locals congregate for a coffee or an aperitif. The city has had a complicated history with the cruise industry, an increasing number of activists are calling for ships to be banned from docking in Venice. Cruise ships dock in several terminals at Stazione Marittima, which is to the west of the city.

The ship Pacific Princess

If there’s an ocean, then this intimate cruise ship can take you there! She is one of the Small Ships of Princess, reserved for sailing some of the most exotic destinations in the world.

Capacity
670
Cabins
338
Total crew
375
Length
592m

Food and drink

The Princess chefs are true culinary artists who insist on serving the very finest cuisine - and it shows. The entire fleet has been inducted into the prestigious Chaîne des Rôtisseurs gastronomic society. Each chef's menu is creative and the selections change every day. Pair that with impeccable service and you're in for an unforgettable gourmet experience.

Traditional- Club Restaurant

Ocean Princess' Club Restaurant, located on deck 5, is it's main dining room.

With open seating from 7.30am to 9.30am for breakfast, 12... Read more

Complimentary
Classic

Sabatini's

This Italian restaurant is a refined yet casual dining establishment rich in atmosphere, showcasing an Italian and Mediterranean menu with a heavy... Read more

Cover
Italian

Sterling Steakhouse

The Sterling Steakhouse, recently voted one of the "Best Cruise Ship Steakhouses" by USA Today, showcases prime cuts of Sterling Silver grain-fed... Read more

Cover
Steakhouse

Ultimate Balcony Dining

Stay in for dinner and enjoy the Ultimate Balcony Dining Experience, delivered right to the comfort of your own balcony.

Cover
Room

Panorama Buffet & Pizzeria

The Panorama Buffet is Ocean's casual buffet style eatery open for breakfast, lunch, afternoon tea and dinner and has both indoor and... Read more

Complimentary
Buffet

Trident Grill

Follow your nose to the Trident Grill where the burgers are flipping and the hotdogs roasting, served with a variety of fixin’s... Read more

Complimentary
Bbq

Entertainment

To say the night-life on-board is entertaining is an understatement. Illuminating the stage in captivating productions, Princess Cruises performers are some of the most talented musicians, singers and dancers at sea. Our Princess Signature Shows, lounge performers, movies and casinos are just some of the entertainment our guests enjoy as they escape completely.

Cabaret Lounge

The ideal place for guests to go and watch a theatre production or a movie on the big screen. 

Located on deck 5, The... Read more

Pacific Lounge

The second large lounge, located on deck 10 is the Pacific Lounge. High on the ship overlooking the bow, it offers spectacular views.... Read more

Casino & Casino Bar

The casino on Deck 5 features an array of the latest slots and your favourite games of chance including blackjack, Texas Hold'em,... Read more

Library

The ship's library has a wide range of both fiction and non-fiction books for guests to read either in the comfortable seating... Read more

Internet Room

The Internet Cafe on deck 9 has 8 computer stations and printing facilities (charges apply for printing also).

Charges for the internet (subject... Read more

Shops & Boutiques

The ship has two shops on deck 5 selling items ranging from fashion, logo clothing and souvenirs to duty free spirits, jewellery... Read more

Health and fitness

The many activities on-board our ships are designed to stimulate, educate, entertain, inspire and sweat - not necessarily in that order. But, guests can be sure crew onboard will do their best to cover all the bases. From art auctions to the Spa, this ship is loaded with fun things to do.

Lido

You'll enjoy complete relaxation as you float serenely in the pool, located on deck 9 with two hot tubs. The Pool area... Read more

Sports Centre

This ship will keep you on the run, literally, with basketball, paddle tennis, jogging tracks and state-of-the-art gyms equipped with machines that'll... Read more

The Lotus Spa

The Lotus Spa includes a fitness centre, beauty salon, treatments rooms with treatments such as massages, body wraps and facials and Steam rooms... Read more

Kids and teens

Ocean Princess has no facilities for children as due to the nature of the cruises, the ship doesn't attract many children. 

However when 20 or more children aged from 3-17 are travelling youth programmes are offered with events designed to cater for them.

Enrichment

When is a cruise an opportunity to enrich? When it's a Princess cruise. This ship offers area lectures, art exhibits and classes taught by local experts.

[email protected]

Expand your mind with an array of engaging [email protected] opportunities. There are up to 40 classes on every cruise. Tantalise your taste... Read more

Useful info

Disabled Facilities

Wheelchair users will find access-friendly design across most of the Princess fleet, making it easy to enjoy each vessel's restaurants, theaters, spas,... Read more

Special Dietary Requirements

Princess Cruises are happy to meet your request for low-sodium, low-fat, low-sugar and vegetarian diets. Kosher meals and baby food are available... Read more

Age Restrictions

The legal drinking age of 21 years is always observed on-board all ships and proof of age may be required. All on-board... Read more

Dress Code

You should dress for a cruise with Princess the same way you would for any stylish land-based resort.
Casual sportswear, including shorts, lightweight... Read more

Drinks Packages

All Inclusive Beverage Package:
Relax and enjoy the convenience of an all inclusive beverage package featuring any drink up to $10 including cocktails,... Read more

E-Cigarette & Smoking Policies

Keeping the comfort of our guests a priority, and in consideration of consumer studies which show smokers are a small minority of... Read more

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Prices shown are per person based on two people sharing (unless otherwise specfied) in GBP and subject to availability. Certain restrictions can apply. Prices are updated on a daily basis and may vary when continuing through the booking process.