MSC Cruises

10-night Northern Europe from Hamburg

MSC Preziosa

The classic design of beautifully crafted MSC Preziosa includes spectacular features such as a real stone piazza ,sweeping Swarovski crystal staircases and a magical ‘infinity’ pool. There’s all this and more to discover at your own pace on board, enjoying every moment to the full as you voyage to some of the world’s most beautiful∘ destinations.

Explore the ship
Itinerary highlights
Hamburg Germany
Blarney Castle, County Cork, Ireland Cork Ireland
Samuel Beckett Bridge in Dublin, Ireland Dublin Ireland
Ship highlights
Photo of the The Golden Lobster The Golden Lobster
Photo of the MSC Yacht Club MSC Yacht Club
Photo of the Platinum Theatre Platinum Theatre
from
£819
per person
from
£82
per night
Free cancellation up to 21 days before you sail through 31 Dec 2021
18 Apr 2021
£899 £819
18 Apr 2021
£1,059 £979
18 Apr 2021
£1,259 £1,129
18 Apr 2021
£2,009 £1,699
Book from £819 Email me this cruise

Stress Free Cruising

Reschedule your booking for free up to 15 days before your sail date for cruise only, and up to 21 days before departure for fly cruises. Applies to bookings made before 30 October 2020 on sailings through 31 December 2021.

Find out more

The itinerary

Hamburg is Germany’s second-largest city with a history dating back to Charlemagne. A major port, this vibrant city is home to art and culture, extensive shopping facilities, Baroque buildings and waterfront vistas. With its well-known fish market, art galleries and Museums together with several beautiful parks including a botanical garden, this is a city with something for everyone. British visitors who remember the Swinging Sixties may like to visit the streets around Grosse Freiheit, where an unknown pop group called The Beatles gave their first public performances in various local clubs before achieving worldwide fame. Please note: Those on the Saga Pearl II P2216 cruise in December 2018 should be aware that the Christmas Market is likely to be extremely busy during your call.

Day 2At Sea

Cork City received its first charter in 1185 from Prince John of Norman England, and it takes its name from the Irish word corcaigh, meaning "marshy place." The original 6th-century settlement was spread over 13 small islands in the River Lee. Major development occurred during the 17th and 18th centuries with the expansion of the butter trade, and many attractive Georgian-design buildings with wide bowfront windows were constructed during this time. As late as 1770 Cork's present-day main streets—Grand Parade, Patrick Street, and the South Mall—were submerged under the Lee. Around 1800, when the Lee was partially dammed, the river divided into two streams that now flow through the city, leaving the main business and commercial center on an island, not unlike Paris's Île de la Cité. As a result, the city has a number of bridges and quays, which, although initially confusing, add greatly to the port's unique character. Cork can be very "Irish" (hurling, Gaelic football, televised plowing contests, music pubs, and peat smoke). But depending on what part of town you're in, Cork can also be distinctly un-Irish—the sort of place where hippies, gays, and farmers drink at the same pub.

Blarney Castle, County Cork, Ireland

Dublin is making a comeback. The decade-long "Celtic Tiger" boom era was quickly followed by the Great Recession, but The Recovery has finally taken a precarious hold. For visitors, this newer and wiser Dublin has become one of western Europe's most popular and delightful urban destinations. Whether or not you're out to enjoy the old or new Dublin, you'll find it a colossally entertaining city, all the more astonishing considering its intimate size.It is ironic and telling that James Joyce chose Dublin as the setting for his famous Ulysses, Dubliners, and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man because it was a "center of paralysis" where nothing much ever changed. Which only proves that even the greats get it wrong sometimes. Indeed, if Joyce were to return to his once-genteel hometown today—disappointed with the city's provincial outlook, he left it in 1902 at the age of 20—and take a quasi-Homeric odyssey through the city (as he so famously does in Ulysses), would he even recognize Dublin as his "Dear Dirty Dumpling, foostherfather of fingalls and dotthergills"?For instance, what would he make of Temple Bar—the city's erstwhile down-at-the-heels neighborhood, now crammed with cafés and trendy hotels and suffused with a nonstop, international-party atmosphere? Or the simple sophistication of the open-air restaurants of the tiny Italian Quarter (named Quartier Bloom after his own creation), complete with sultry tango lessons? Or of the hot–cool Irishness, where every aspect of Celtic culture results in sold-out theaters, from Once, the cult indie movie and Broadway hit, to Riverdance, the old Irish mass-jig recast as a Las Vegas extravaganza? Plus, the resurrected Joyce might be stirred by the songs of Hozier, fired up by the sultry acting of Michael Fassbender, and moved by the award-winning novels of Colum McCann. As for Ireland's capital, it's packed with elegant shops and hotels, theaters, galleries, coffeehouses, and a stunning variety of new, creative little restaurants can be found on almost every street in Dublin, transforming the provincial city that suffocated Joyce into a place almost as cosmopolitan as the Paris to which he fled. And the locals are a hell of a lot more fun! Now that the economy has finally turned a corner, Dublin citizens can cast a cool eye over the last 20 crazy years. Some argue that the boomtown transformation of their heretofore-tranquil city has permanently affected its spirit and character. These skeptics (skepticism long being a favorite pastime in the capital city) await the outcome of "Dublin: The Sequel," and their greatest fear is the possibility that the tattered old lady on the Liffey has become a little less unique, a little more like everywhere else.Oh ye of little faith: the rare ole gem that is Dublin is far from buried. The fundamentals—the Georgian elegance of Merrion Square, the Norman drama of Christ Church Cathedral, the foamy pint at an atmospheric pub—are still on hand to gratify. Most of all, there are the locals themselves: the nod and grin when you catch their eye on the street, the eagerness to hear half your life story before they tell you all of theirs, and their paradoxically dark but warm sense of humor. It's expected that 2016 will be an extra-special year in the capital, as centenary celebrations of the fateful 1916 Easter Rising will dominate much of the cultural calendar.

Samuel Beckett Bridge in Dublin, Ireland

Before English and Scottish settlers arrived in the 1600s, Belfast was a tiny village called Béal Feirste ("sandbank ford") belonging to Ulster's ancient O'Neill clan. With the advent of the Plantation period (when settlers arrived in the 1600s), Sir Arthur Chichester, from Devon in southwestern England, received the city from the English Crown, and his son was made Earl of Donegall. Huguenots fleeing persecution from France settled near here, bringing their valuable linen-work skills. In the 18th century, Belfast underwent a phenomenal expansion—its population doubled every 10 years, despite an ever-present sectarian divide. Although the Anglican gentry despised the Presbyterian artisans—who, in turn, distrusted the native Catholics—Belfast's growth continued at a dizzying speed. The city was a great Victorian success story, an industrial boomtown whose prosperity was built on trade, especially linen and shipbuilding. Famously (or infamously), the Titanic was built here, giving Belfast, for a time, the nickname "Titanic Town." Having laid the foundation stone of the city's university in 1845, Queen Victoria returned to Belfast in 1849 (she is recalled in the names of buildings, streets, bars, monuments, and other places around the city), and in the same year, the university opened under the name Queen's College. Nearly 40 years later, in 1888, Victoria granted Belfast its city charter. Today its population is nearly 300,000, tourist numbers have increased, and this dramatically transformed city is enjoying an unparalleled renaissance.This is all a welcome change from the period when news about Belfast meant reports about "the Troubles." Since the 1994 ceasefire, Northern Ireland's capital city has benefited from major hotel investment, gentrified quaysides (or strands), a sophisticated new performing arts center, and major initiatives to boost tourism. Although the 1996 bombing of offices at Canary Wharf in London disrupted the 1994 peace agreement, the ceasefire was officially reestablished on July 20, 1997, and this embattled city began its quest for a newfound identity.Since 2008, the city has restored all its major public buildings such as museums, churches, theaters, City Hall, Ulster Hall—and even the glorious Crown Bar—spending millions of pounds on its built heritage. A gaol that at the height of the Troubles held some of the most notorious murderers involved in paramilitary violence is now a major visitor attraction.Belfast's city center is made up of three roughly contiguous areas that are easy to navigate on foot. From the south end to the north, it's about an hour's leisurely walk.

City Hall in Belfast, United Kingdom

Trendy stores, a booming cultural life, fascinating architecture, and stylish restaurants reinforce Glasgow's claim to being Scotland's most exciting city. After decades of decline, it has experienced an urban renaissance uniquely its own. The city’s grand architecture reflects a prosperous past built on trade and shipbuilding. Today buildings by Charles Rennie Mackintosh hold pride of place along with the Zaha Hadid–designed Riverside Museum.Glasgow (the "dear green place," as it was known) was founded some 1,500 years ago. Legend has it that the king of Strathclyde, irate about his wife's infidelity, had a ring he had given her thrown into the river Clyde. (Apparently she had passed it on to an admirer.) When the king demanded to know where the ring had gone, the distraught queen asked the advice of her confessor, St. Mungo. He suggested fishing for it—and the first salmon to emerge had the ring in its mouth. The moment is commemorated on the city's coat of arms.The medieval city expanded when it was given a royal license to trade; the current High Street was the main thoroughfare at the time. The vast profits from American cotton and tobacco built the grand mansions of the Merchant City in the 18th century. In the 19th century the river Clyde became the center of a vibrant shipbuilding industry, fed by the city’s iron and steel works. The city grew again, but its internal divisions grew at the same time. The West End harbored the elegant homes of the newly rich shipyard owners. Down by the river, areas like the infamous Gorbals, with its crowded slums, sheltered the laborers who built the ships. They came from the Highlands, expelled to make way for sheep, or from Ireland, where the potato famines drove thousands from their homes.During the 19th century the population grew from 80,000 to more than a million. And the new prosperity gave Glasgow its grand neoclassical buildings, such as those built by Alexander "Greek" Thomson, as well as the adventurous visionary buildings designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh and others who produced Glasgow’s Arts and Crafts movement. The City Chambers, built in 1888, are a proud statement in marble and gold sandstone, a clear symbol of the wealthy and powerful Victorian industrialists' hopes for the future.The decline of shipbuilding and the closure of the factories led to much speculation as to what direction the city would take now. The curious thing is that, at least in part, the past gave the city a new lease of life. It was as if people looked at their city and saw Glasgow’s beauty for the first time: its extraordinarily rich architectural heritage, its leafy parks, its artistic heritage, and its complex social history. Today Glasgow is a vibrant cultural center and a commercial hub, as well as a launching pad from which to explore the rest of Scotland, which, as it turns out, is not so far away. In fact, it takes only 40 minutes to reach Loch Lomond, where the other Scotland begins.

Glasgow City Chambers, Glasgow

Day 7At Sea

In bustling Kirkwall, the main town on Orkney, there's plenty to see in the narrow, winding streets extending from the harbor. The cathedral and some museums are highlights.

The town of Kirkwall on the Orkney Islands

The port of Invergordon is your gateway to the Great Glen, an area of Scotland that includes Loch Ness and the city of Inverness. Inverness, the capital of the Highlands, has the flavor of a Lowland town, its winds blowing in a sea-salt air from the Moray Firth. The Great Glen is also home to one of the world's most famous monster myths: in 1933, during a quiet news week, the editor of a local paper decided to run a story about a strange sighting of something splashing about in Loch Ness. But there's more to look for here besides Nessie, including inland lochs, craggy and steep-sided mountains, rugged promontories, deep inlets, brilliant purple and emerald moorland, and forests filled with astonishingly varied wildlife, including mountain hares, red deer, golden eagles, and ospreys.

Urquhart Castle, Loch Ness in Scotland

Day 10At Sea

Hamburg is Germany’s second-largest city with a history dating back to Charlemagne. A major port, this vibrant city is home to art and culture, extensive shopping facilities, Baroque buildings and waterfront vistas. With its well-known fish market, art galleries and Museums together with several beautiful parks including a botanical garden, this is a city with something for everyone. British visitors who remember the Swinging Sixties may like to visit the streets around Grosse Freiheit, where an unknown pop group called The Beatles gave their first public performances in various local clubs before achieving worldwide fame. Please note: Those on the Saga Pearl II P2216 cruise in December 2018 should be aware that the Christmas Market is likely to be extremely busy during your call.

The ship MSC Preziosa

The classic design of beautifully crafted MSC Preziosa includes spectacular features such as a real stone piazza ,sweeping Swarovski crystal staircases and a magical ‘infinity’ pool. There’s all this and more to discover at your own pace on board, enjoying every moment to the full as you voyage to some of the world’s most beautiful∘ destinations.

Capacity
3502
Cabins
1751
Total crew
1388
Length
1093m

Food and drink

There are a variety of restaurants available onboard, including two main dining rooms, a self-service buffet, and a number of casual snack or lunch options. Two traditional sittings, flexible and casual dining options are all available.

Eataly

The Eataly Steakhouse serves modern and traditional Italian food. The Eataly on the MSC Preziosa is fashioned after the famed restaurant in... Read more

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Italian

The Golden Lobster

The Golden Lobster restaurant is the ship's main dining room split over two levels on decks 5 and 6 with seating for... Read more

Complimentary
International

Self Service Buffet Restaurants

The ship's self service complimentary buffet spans almost half the length of deck 14. It seats 412 guests in the Inca section... Read more

Complimentary
Buffet

Sports Bar

The 87 seater Sports Bar serves à la carte snacks and is open from 3pm to 12am.

Located on deck 7 with large... Read more

Complimentary
Classic

Phoenician Plaza Ice Cream Bar

Seating 80 guests and located on deck 6 of the ship, is designed to reflect an Italian Square with live music, a... Read more

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Ice Cream

L’Arabesque

L’Arabesque is Preziosa's other Main Dining Room offering panoramic views and located on deck 6 with seating for 766 passengers.

With open seating for... Read more

Complimentary
International

Ristorante Italia

An intimate, 30-seat venue adjacent to Eataly only open for dinner. This specialty restaurant features a different menu each night that was... Read more

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Italian

Nutella Corner and Happy Puppy Ice Crystal Drink Stand

Nutella Corner is located near the Aqua Park pool on deck 14, and serves chocolate crêpes and the Happy Puppy Ice crystal... Read more

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Themed

La Locanda

La Locanda is Preziosa’s Pizzeria Wine bar, seating 105 guests and located on deck 7 of the ship just outside the Italian... Read more

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Pizzeria

Galaxy Lounge

Based on the style of 1950s supper clubs, the à la carte Galaxy Lounge on deck 16 offer panoramic views and background... Read more

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International

Entertainment

MSC Cruises’ uncompromising dedication to its passengers is nowhere more evident than the unrivalled entertainment programmes and facilities offered on board, with its state-of-the-art 1600 seat Theatre, futuristic Disco and Casino with over 1000 square metres of casino gaming and Virtual World, video games room.

Platinum Theatre

The 1,600 seat Theatre Lounge found onboard offers at least 6 different shows, and spans two decks. The seats are tiered, allowing... Read more

Sports Bar

The name says it all; onboard passengers are unlikely to find a better place to relax and catch a game. There's a... Read more

Millennium Star Casino

The Casino, seating 323 features Roulette, poker, blackjack, and slot machines. It is served by its own bar.

Green Sax Jazz Bar

The Green Sax Jazz Bar has seating for 106 visitors and features live jazz music along with a special range of 'made... Read more

Diamond Bar & Library

The Diamond Bar overlooks the central atrium and is located on deck 6 serving the foyer area. It can seat up to 98... Read more

Preziosa Bar

The Bar is on deck 5 by the central atrium with 28 seats.

Guests can enjoy a drink here whilst listening to classical... Read more

El Dorado Piano Bar

The ship's Piano and Martini Bar, seats 108 and is located on deck 7.

The Pool Bars

The Pool bars are located by the Pool on deck 14.

Il Cappuccino Coffee Bar

The ship's coffee shop serves a selection of cakes and desserts.

It is located on deck 7 with room for 58 passengers.

Sweet Shop

La Caramella, on deck 6, is the ship's candy and confectionary shop, featuring a large variety of pic ‘n’ mix sweets along with... Read more

Boutiques

The ship boasts a variety of shops and boutiques. 

From the MSC Logo shop that sells MSC clothes, souvenirs and toys, La Profumeria selling a... Read more

Photo Shop

The Photo Shop is located on deck 7. Photos captured by the ship's professional photographers both on board and ashore can be viewed... Read more

Cyber Cafe

Guests can access the internet and their emails either using their own portable wireless devices or via the ship's Cybercafe on deck... Read more

Art Gallery

The Art Gallery features a selection of artwork from fine prints, lithographs, water colours and oils which can be purchased during the... Read more

4D Cinema

Fantasia’s 4D ten seat cinema, with 3D graphics and moving seats to enhance guests' experience, is located on deck 16 aft and... Read more

F1 Simulator

The Formula One Simulator on deck 16 offers guests the chance to experience racing a Formula one car around a variety of... Read more

La Locanda

Serving a wide selection of wines by the glass or bottle along with cocktails, 22 different varieties of bottled and draught beer... Read more

Galaxy Lounge

Galaxy Lounge on deck 16 is the ship's nightclub served by its own bar with a themed cocktail menu for guests to sample... Read more

Safari Lounge

The Safari lounge on deck 7 seats 295 guests and is the ship's show lounge with its own bar and dance floor.... Read more

Health and fitness

The ship is well equipped to ensure her passengers stay active whilst travelling. From a fully-equipped gym with panoramic sea views, to an outdoor jogging track, to the MSC Aurea Spa. The Aurea Spa offers a range of treatments, including massages, facials, aromatherapy, as well as the only Balinese Spa at sea.

Gym

The fully-equipped onboard gyms comes with stunning views as standard, courtesy of the panoramic windows., within the Spa. Fitted with the latest... Read more

MSC Aurea Spa

The 1700 square metre MSC Aurea Spa on deck 14 with stunning sea views offers several innovative features unique to Preziosa including... Read more

The Pools and Aqua Park

The outdoor Aqua Park and pool are mid-ship on deck 14. This is the main pool and it includes several different areas,... Read more

Top 18 Solarium

The Top 18 Exclusive Solarium is an adult only sanctuary on deck 18 featuring premium deck space, comfortable cocoons, a whirlpool bath,... Read more

Beauty Salon

Guests wishing to have their hair styled or cut, manicures, pedicures or barber services for male passengers, can visit the ship's beauty... Read more

Kids and teens

From the splash-filled fun and games of the Doremi Castle kids’ aqua park and the high-speed thrill of Vertigo, one of the longest water slides on the seas, to the teens only disco and video arcade, there’s a world of enjoyment for children of all ages.

Doremi Land & Kids Club

Doremi Land is home to the Mini and Junior Kid's Club and is located midship of deck 15. Designed around the world... Read more

Teen Disco Graffiti

MSC Teens Disco, located on Deck 15, is the perfect place for teenagers with its urban style design including multi-coloured graffiti, atmospheric... Read more

Virtual Reality Games

An onboard arcade, with a variety of video games and digital options. Open to all children onboard and located on deck 6.

Doremi Castle Aqua Park Adventures (Kids Pool)

The Doremi Castle Aqua Park Adventures on deck 16, is the ship's waterpark for children. With sprays, fountains and other water features... Read more

Enrichment

Enrichment onboard MSC include Language lessons, dance classes, arts & crafts, and many more.

MSC Yacht Club

The Fantasia class MSC ships feature a "ship-within-a-ship" area called the MSC Yacht Club. This private club area is forward on decks... Read more

Useful info

Pregnancy

The medical facilities and equipment onboard may not be adequate enough to deal with a birth or any pregnancy complications. Therefore, for... Read more

Disabled Facilities

Guests with special needs should inform MSC Cruises of their needs, ideally, at the time of booking, or at the very latest,... Read more

Dietary Requirements

Any guests with food intolerances and/or allergies are asked to inform MSC Cruises of their requirements through the Special Needs form (available... Read more

Dress Code

Casual wear is advised is advised for life onboard and shore excursions. For informal evenings, summery dresses for women and a lightweight... Read more

Improving Air Quality from Ship Emissions

MSC Cruises is making significant investments into improving air quality. As part of a broader approach to limit sulphur and other emissions... Read more

Energy Saving Technology Onboard

Voyage planning software

An optimised itinerary means a reduced consumption of energy. We plan our itineraries efficiently and use specialised software to optimise... Read more

Energy Efficiency and Advanced Ship Design

From the first line we draw on paper when we design a new ship, to the final light bulb we install, energy... Read more

Water Preservation

Fresh water is a finite resource. Our philosophy is to use it sparingly and efficiently. To this end, we take as many... Read more

From Wastewater to High Quality Water Discharges

No black wastewater from our shipboard operations leaves our ships without proper treatment and any discharges from our fleet undergo a comprehensive... Read more

Protecting Marine Life with Ballast Water Treatment Systems

To protect the marine ecosystem in which the ship sails, our ships are fitted with a ballast water treatment system that complies... Read more

State-of-the-Art Solid Waste Management

Throughout the years, we have taken voluntary steps to equip our ships with state-of-the-art solid waste management and recycling facilities on board.... Read more

Eliminating Single-use Plastics

Under our Plastics Reduction Programme, MSC Cruises is in the final phase of effectively eliminating an extensive number of plastic items from... Read more

Exploring New Technologies and Solutions

Our environmental efforts are an ongoing journey. We will keep exploring and developing new solutions for our future – and existing –... Read more

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Flights available from Bordeaux, Clermont-Ferrand, Lyon, Marseille, Montpellier, Nantes, Nice, Paris Charles de Gaulle, and Toulouse airports
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* Passengers should be aged under 18 at the time of embarkation to qualify as a child.
Prices shown are per person based on two people sharing (unless otherwise specfied) in GBP and subject to availability. Certain restrictions can apply. Prices are updated on a daily basis and may vary when continuing through the booking process.