Azamara

10-night France Intensive Voyage

Azamara Quest

Your boutique hotel at sea, the Azamara Quest® is a mid-sized ship with a deck plan that’s intimate but never crowded, and offers everything modern voyagers are looking for—plus some unexpected extras.

Explore the ship
Itinerary highlights
Boats in Southampton Harbour Southampton United Kingdom
The harbour in Honfleur, France Honfleur France
The city of Rouen, France Rouen France
Ship highlights
Photo of the Aqualina Aqualina
Photo of the Enrichment Program & Classes Enrichment Program & Classes
Photo of the Mosaic Cafe and Mosaic @ Night Mosaic Cafe and Mosaic @ Night
from
£2,344
per person
from
£234
per night
Free cancellation up to 30 days before you sail through 30 April 2022
9 Sep 2021
£3,319 £2,344
9 Sep 2021
£3,709 £2,596
9 Sep 2021
£4,089 £2,967
9 Sep 2021
£5,289 £4,052
Book from £2,344 Email me this cruise

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The itinerary

Southampton is the UK's largest and busiest cruise port, catering for over 1.5 million passengers every year. Located just a two hour drive out of London, or an 80-minute train journey, Southampton has a rich history on display across the city's museums and cultural venues, as well as leading shopping shopping outlets, many restaurants and bars, and award-winning public parks. Walking around the city centre, you'll see many remnants of the ancient city walls, don't miss the Bargate Monument – a Grade I-listed medieval gatehouse. Further afield, you can take in the sights of nearby cities of Portsmouth and Winchester, or visit the world-renowned heritage site of Stonehenge.

Boats in Southampton Harbour

Honfleur, the most picturesque of the Côte Fleurie's seaside towns, is a time-burnished place with a surplus of half-timber houses and cobbled streets that are lined with a stunning selection of stylish boutiques. Much of its Renaissance architecture remains intact—especially around the 17th-century Vieux Bassin harbor, where the water is fronted on one side by two-story stone houses with low, sloping roofs and on the other by tall slate-topped houses with wooden facades. Maritime expeditions (including some of the first voyages to Canada) departed from here; later, Impressionists were inspired to capture it on canvas. But the town as a whole has become increasingly crowded since the Pont de Normandie opened in 1995. Providing a direct link with Upper Normandy, the world's sixth-largest cable-stayed bridge is supported by two concrete pylons taller than the Eiffel Tower and designed to resist winds of 257 kph (160 mph).

The harbour in Honfleur, France

Honfleur, the most picturesque of the Côte Fleurie's seaside towns, is a time-burnished place with a surplus of half-timber houses and cobbled streets that are lined with a stunning selection of stylish boutiques. Much of its Renaissance architecture remains intact—especially around the 17th-century Vieux Bassin harbor, where the water is fronted on one side by two-story stone houses with low, sloping roofs and on the other by tall slate-topped houses with wooden facades. Maritime expeditions (including some of the first voyages to Canada) departed from here; later, Impressionists were inspired to capture it on canvas. But the town as a whole has become increasingly crowded since the Pont de Normandie opened in 1995. Providing a direct link with Upper Normandy, the world's sixth-largest cable-stayed bridge is supported by two concrete pylons taller than the Eiffel Tower and designed to resist winds of 257 kph (160 mph).

The harbour in Honfleur, France

Originally a little fishing village, Cherbourg has developed into a historic port designed by Vauban. This was also a strategic naval port during the Napoleonic wars; there is a marina with over 1000 moorings. “Cap de la Hague” is to the West and the “Pointe de Barfleur” to the East. This port, which belongs to Normandy, is a region that has provided inspiration for countless artists and writers, and is the land of apple orchards and rolling farmland dotted with villages of half-timbered houses. Boasting a wealth of abbeys and châteaux, as well as a superb coastline, it offers something for everyone. Cherbourg was also the first stop of RMS Titanic after it left Southampton, England. On 19 June 1864, the naval engagement between USS Kearsarge and CSS Alabama took place off Cherbourg. The Battle of Cherbourg, fought in June 1944 following the Normandy Invasion, ended with the capture of Cherbourg on June 30.

Sunset at Cherbourg, France

Thrust out into the sea and bound to the mainland only by tenuous man-made causeways, romantic St-Malo has built a reputation as a breeding ground for phenomenal sailors. Many were fishermen, but others—most notably Jacques Cartier, who claimed Canada for Francis I in 1534—were New World explorers. Still others were corsairs, "sea dogs" paid by the French crown to harass the Limeys across the Channel: legendary ones like Robert Surcouf and Duguay-Trouin helped make St-Malo rich through their pillaging, in the process earning it the nickname "the pirates' city." The St-Malo you see today isn’t quite the one they called home because a weeklong fire in 1944, kindled by retreating Nazis, wiped out nearly all of the old buildings. Restoration work was more painstaking than brilliant, but the narrow streets and granite houses of the Vieille Ville were satisfactorily recreated, enabling St-Malo to regain its role as a busy fishing port, seaside resort, and tourist destination. The ramparts that help define this city figuratively and literally are authentic, and the flames also spared houses along Rue de Pelicot in the Vieille Ville. Battalions of tourists invade this quaint part of town in summer, so arrive off-season if you want to avoid crowds.

Mountain Chapel on the Rock, Saint-Malo

Day 7At Sea

The gateway to the Atlantic Ocean and the country’s seventh largest city, Nantes is located on the north bank of the Loire River. Although officially no longer the capital of Brittany since Nantes was included in the Pays de Loire administrative region, many of the city’s inhabitants regard themselves still an integral part of Brittany. During medieval times, much of the city’s prosperity resulted from colonial expeditions and the slave trade. Today Nantes is the most important commercial and industrial centre in west-central France, and appears as a particularly well-managed city with fine museums and carefully tended parks and gardens. One of the museums is dedicated to Jules Verne, born here in 1828. The Loire, foundation of Nantes’ riches, has dwindled from the city centre. As recently as the 1930s the river crossed the city in seven separate channels. However, they were filled in after World War II but, fortunately, left the area’s 18th-century mansions intact. They once were the trademark of rich merchants who made their fortunes from the slave trade. French influence was brought to Nantes by the Loire and its trade from the end of the 18th century when the city became known as "Little Paris." The Place Royale and the Place Graslin were first laid out during that time. One of the most impressive landmarks is the Chateau des Ducs, most of which is preserved in its original form built by the last two rulers of independent Brittany, Francois II, and his daughter Duchess Anne, born here in 1477.

Cathedral of Saint-Pierre-et-Saint-Paul in Nantes, France

Day 9Cruising

The gateway to the Atlantic Ocean and the country’s seventh largest city, Nantes is located on the north bank of the Loire River. Although officially no longer the capital of Brittany since Nantes was included in the Pays de Loire administrative region, many of the city’s inhabitants regard themselves still an integral part of Brittany. During medieval times, much of the city’s prosperity resulted from colonial expeditions and the slave trade. Today Nantes is the most important commercial and industrial centre in west-central France, and appears as a particularly well-managed city with fine museums and carefully tended parks and gardens. One of the museums is dedicated to Jules Verne, born here in 1828. The Loire, foundation of Nantes’ riches, has dwindled from the city centre. As recently as the 1930s the river crossed the city in seven separate channels. However, they were filled in after World War II but, fortunately, left the area’s 18th-century mansions intact. They once were the trademark of rich merchants who made their fortunes from the slave trade. French influence was brought to Nantes by the Loire and its trade from the end of the 18th century when the city became known as "Little Paris." The Place Royale and the Place Graslin were first laid out during that time. One of the most impressive landmarks is the Chateau des Ducs, most of which is preserved in its original form built by the last two rulers of independent Brittany, Francois II, and his daughter Duchess Anne, born here in 1477.

Cathedral of Saint-Pierre-et-Saint-Paul in Nantes, France

Bordeaux as a whole, rather than any particular points within it, is what you'll want to visit in order to understand why Victor Hugo described it as Versailles plus Antwerp, and why the painter Francisco de Goya, when exiled from his native Spain, chose it as his last home (he died here in 1828). The capital of southwest France and the region's largest city, Bordeaux remains synonymous with the wine trade: wine shippers have long maintained their headquarters along the banks of the Garonne, while buyers from around the world arrive for the huge biennial Vinexpo show (held in odd-number years).Bordeaux is, admittedly, a less exuberant city than many others in France, but lively and stylish elements are making a dent in its conservative veneer. The cleaned-up riverfront is said by some, after a bottle or two, to exude an elegance reminiscent of St. Petersburg, and that aura of 18th-century élan also permeates the historic downtown sector—“le vieux Bordeaux"—where fine shops invite exploration. To the south of the city center are old docklands undergoing renewal—one train station has now been transformed into a big multiplex movie theater—but the area is still a bit shady. To get a feel for the historic port of Bordeaux, take the 90-minute boat trip that leaves Quai Louis-XVIII every weekday afternoon, or the regular passenger ferry that plies the Garonne between Quai Richelieu and the Pont d'Aquitaine in summer. A nice time to stroll around the city center is the first Sunday of the month, when it's pedestrian-only and vehicles are banned.

Bordeaux as a whole, rather than any particular points within it, is what you'll want to visit in order to understand why Victor Hugo described it as Versailles plus Antwerp, and why the painter Francisco de Goya, when exiled from his native Spain, chose it as his last home (he died here in 1828). The capital of southwest France and the region's largest city, Bordeaux remains synonymous with the wine trade: wine shippers have long maintained their headquarters along the banks of the Garonne, while buyers from around the world arrive for the huge biennial Vinexpo show (held in odd-number years).Bordeaux is, admittedly, a less exuberant city than many others in France, but lively and stylish elements are making a dent in its conservative veneer. The cleaned-up riverfront is said by some, after a bottle or two, to exude an elegance reminiscent of St. Petersburg, and that aura of 18th-century élan also permeates the historic downtown sector—“le vieux Bordeaux"—where fine shops invite exploration. To the south of the city center are old docklands undergoing renewal—one train station has now been transformed into a big multiplex movie theater—but the area is still a bit shady. To get a feel for the historic port of Bordeaux, take the 90-minute boat trip that leaves Quai Louis-XVIII every weekday afternoon, or the regular passenger ferry that plies the Garonne between Quai Richelieu and the Pont d'Aquitaine in summer. A nice time to stroll around the city center is the first Sunday of the month, when it's pedestrian-only and vehicles are banned.

The ship Azamara Quest

Your boutique hotel at sea, the Azamara Quest® is a mid-sized ship with a deck plan that’s intimate but never crowded, and offers everything modern voyagers are looking for—plus some unexpected extras.

Capacity
690
Total crew
408
Length
592m

Food and drink

At Azamara Club Cruises® we take you to remarkable destinations. We also give you more time to fall in love with them. It’s what we call Destination Immersion® experiences, and it's what happens when you can stay longer and experience more local life and culture in every port.

But Destination Immersion® experiences don't just happen on shore. They happen onboard, too. What does that mean for dining with Azamara Club Cruises®? We incorporate the flavors of a destination into our food and drink menus. What does that mean for you? An exclusive, local, and personalized culinary experience. It’s time to get a real taste for travel.

NEW VEGAN MENU

Plant-based diet? Now there’s a menu just for you – available at Discoveries, Prime C, and Aqualina.

Aqualina

At Aqualina, you’ll find some of Italy’s most authentic dishes. Pastas made from scratch, traditional and authentic recipes, and scrumptious vegetarian dishes... Read more

Cover
Fusion

Prime C

Steaks cooked to perfection. Crab cakes with remoulade. Lobster bisque. Lamb, game hens and seafood. And last but certainly not least, our... Read more

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Surf Turf

The Wine Cellar

You’ll be hard-pressed to find such a collection of limited production, small label and rare vintage wines anywhere on the high seas!... Read more

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Wine

Discoveries Restaurant

Discover the world through dishes and flavors from the places we visit. Whether it’s our Destination Immersion dinner buffet or the Destination... Read more

Complimentary
Classic

Windows Café

The best way to see where you are in the world is not by looking at your itinerary. It’s by checking out... Read more

Complimentary
Buffet

The Patio and Swirl & Top

Casual “pool grill” by day. Then, fine tablecloths and flickering candles will set the mood for a sit-down al fresco dining experience... Read more

Complimentary
Casual

Mosaic Cafe

Casual “pool grill” by day. Then, fine tablecloths and flickering candles will set the mood for a sit-down al fresco dining experience... Read more

Complimentary
Cafe

The Living Room

Mid-afternoon is teatime in the Looking Glass Lounge. Refresh yourself with elegant pastries, handmade tea sandwiches, and tea or champagne while enjoying... Read more

Cover
Cafe

Room Service

The best time for room service? Whenever you say it is, 24-hours a day. Order from the full breakfast menu between 6.30am... Read more

Cover
Room

Entertainment

A cozy nook to sip coffee. An intimate space to raise a glass and celebrate. A lively setting to catch the latest shows and international entertainment. Watch the world go by, drink in hand from any of Azamara’s bars, lounges, and gathering spaces. From port to port, our onboard venues are the perfect place to unwind after a day of onshore discovery, to connect over drinks both before and after dinner, or take in a one of a kind show. And, with Azamara’s Beverage Packages you can indulge in a superb collection of fine wines, premium spirits, and more—without reaching for your wallet.

Discoveries Lounge

Located just outside Azamara’s main restaurant, this congenial bar is a favorite gathering place for pre- and post-dinner conversation and drinks. Bar... Read more

The Living Room

The idea of the Living Room is just that. To “live in” and to enjoy time with friends and fellow guests! Much... Read more

Cabaret Lounge

Enjoy live performances of professional full-stage musical revues, classical soloists, bands and other entertainment in a cabaret nightclub with a full bar... Read more

Casino Luxe

Test your skill, or prove to your shipmates that Lady Luck stands by your side. The Casino will keep you entertained with... Read more

Mosaic Cafe and Mosaic @ Night

Our onboard coffee corner may very well become your favorite nook on the ship. And with brand new furniture on the Journey,... Read more

Boutiques

You’ll find a tasteful collection of merchandise, beautiful jewelry and watches—and the promise of discovery and delight—in our signature shops. Window shop... Read more

Poolside Parties

Don’t think of missing Azamara’s famous poolside buffet and party, held at least once on every cruise (weather permitting). Colourful décor and... Read more

Spirits

And for all you sports fans, the Spirits bar adjacent to the Casino features a flat-screen TV and full bar, making it... Read more

The Den

Azamara Pursuit and Quest’s newest lounge exemplifies our dedication to Destination Immersion® experiences. The Den inspires you with tools to travel to... Read more

The Drawing Room

This library is one of the quiet jewels of Azamara, a peaceful and beautifully appointed space for reading or relaxing after dinner.... Read more

Health and fitness

LOOK BETTER. FEEL BETTER. GO HOME INVIGORATED.

If you’ve ever wished for a week or two to reboot, this is it. Treat yourself to health, beauty, and restorative treatments in our all new Sanctum Spa. With a focus on wellness and vigour, our relaxing spa offers you the chance to focus on you—something you don’t always have time to do at home. Enjoy an oceanfront massage, a quick manicure before hitting the town to explore, teeth whitening, barber services, or even a healing acupuncture treatment.

But beyond the Sanctum Spa, Azamara is also pleased to offer a full range of complimentary onboard fitness and nutrition classes, including one-on-one personal training for an additional cost. An Azamara voyage is the perfect opportunity to focus on your health—so let us treat you to some rest, relaxation, and rejuvenation.

The Spa

Staffed by professional aestheticians and therapists, the Azamara Spa is an oasis of tranquility. Choose from an extensive menu of services including:

  • The... Read more

The Salon

Our full service salon offers a menu of professional services for men and women, including:

  • Hair styling and care including cuts, colouring, highlights... Read more

Fitness Centre & Personal Training

The secret to maintaining vitality? Exercise more. Many Azamara guests are eager to do just that, and we make it easy with... Read more

Acupuncture

A voyage is a great time to experience the benefits of this ancient Chinese system of healing. Acupuncture strengthens the immune system,... Read more

Kids and teens

Please note: There are no child or teen specific facilities available onboard Azamara Quest.

Enrichment

When you have a passion for authentic travel, you let it take you where you long to go. For Azamara, that means coming aboard, setting sail out on the open sea, and then exploring well beyond it. Azamara has always taken travelers where no one else goes—unrivaled destinations, smaller ports, longer stays—now we venture further ashore. Beyond scratching the surface, so you can discover more history, more arts, more wilderness, more local cuisine, and more local culture than ever before.

Land Programs

Our expanded Land Programs portfolio pairs us up with some of the most reputable independent travel experts in the world, so you... Read more

Enrichment Program & Classes

Your quest to learn continues with destination lecturers offering their expertise throughout each voyage with Azamara®. These leading destination experts will participate... Read more

Useful info

Special Dietary Requirements

With advance notice, we can accommodate most special dietary needs. Please submit your request in writing to our Access Department no later... Read more

Smoking Policy

Each of Azamaras ships have a designated smoking area, located on the starboard forward section of the pool deck. This area is... Read more

Age Restrictions

The minimum drinking age for all alcoholic beverages on all Azamara ships is 21. On European and South American sailings where the... Read more

Disabilities and Special Needs

We welcome guests with disabilities and special needs and work hard to assist them throughout their vacation. To receive appropriate assistance, be... Read more

Service Animals

Cruising with your Companion

Your service dog is welcome onboard, and we make every effort to ensure your comfort and theirs. Please note... Read more

Medical Facilities

Each Azamara vessel is equipped with a medical facility. At least one licensed physician and one nurse are generally in attendance on... Read more

Health & Safety

Fire Risks
Even though fire risk is minimal, fire suppression systems are installed throughout all areas of the vessel. The primary fire suppression... Read more

Dress Code

Guests are encouraged to follow a 'resort casual' dress code, following good taste and common sense. Bare feet, tank tops, baseball caps,... Read more

Room Service

The best time for room service? Whenever you say it is, 24-hours a day.

Order from the full breakfast menu between 6:30 AM... Read more

Internet / WiFi

Prepaid Internet packages can be purchased in incremental packages, based on the number of minutes you plan to use. Internet access on... Read more
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* Passengers should be aged under 18 at the time of embarkation to qualify as a child.
Prices shown are per person based on two people sharing (unless otherwise specfied) in GBP and subject to availability. Certain restrictions can apply. Prices are updated on a daily basis and may vary when continuing through the booking process.