P&O Cruises

14-night Mediterranean

Azura

As P&O’s largest cruise ship, Azura is a family friendly resort ship, with a huge choice of bars, restaurants and unique entertainment options.

Explore the ship
Itinerary highlights
Valletta, Malta viewed from the Mediterranean Sea Valletta Malta
Civitavecchia Italy
Livorno Italy
Ship highlights
Photo of the Meridian Restaurant Meridian Restaurant
Photo of the Dance Classes Dance Classes
Photo of the Library Library
from
£2,049
per person
from
£146
per night
5 Aug 2021
£2,049
5 Aug 2021
£2,229
5 Aug 2021
£2,399 £2,299
5 Aug 2021
£4,542
Book from £2,049 Email me this cruise

The itinerary

Valletta, Malta's capital, has ornate palaces and museums protected by massive fortifications of honey-colour limestone. The main entrance to town is through the City Gate (where all bus routes end), which leads onto Triq Repubblika (Republic Street), the spine of the grid-pattern city and the main shopping street. Triq Mercante (Merchant Street) parallels Repubblika to the east and is also good for strolling. From these two streets, cross streets descend toward the water; some are stepped. Valletta's compactness makes it ideal to explore on foot. Cruise ships dock in the Valletta Waterfront, a short distance from the centre of the city – however, the route is uphill, so bare in mind if you're going to walk from the ship.

Valletta, Malta viewed from the Mediterranean Sea

Day 2At Sea

Civitavecchia is the cruise gateway to Rome. Italy's vibrant capital lives in the present, but no other city on earth evokes its past so powerfully. For over 2,500 years, emperors, popes, artists, and common citizens have left their mark here. Archaeological remains from ancient Rome, art-stuffed churches, and the treasures of Vatican City vie for your attention, but Rome is also a wonderful place to practice the Italian-perfected il dolce far niente, the sweet art of idleness. Your most memorable experiences may include sitting at a caffè in the Campo de' Fiori or strolling in a beguiling piazza.

Livorno is the only spot in Tuscany for cruise ships to dock, and is the gateway to Pisa and Florence for thousands of cruise passengers every day. Most of Livorno's artistic treasures date from the 17th century and aren't all that interesting unless you dote on obscure baroque artists. Livorno's most famous native artist, Amedeo Modigliani (1884–1920), was of much more recent vintage. Sadly, there's no notable work by him in his hometown. The Mercato Nuovo, which has been around since 1894, sells all sorts of fruits, vegetables, grains, meat, and fish. Outdoor markets nearby are also chock-full of local colour. The presence of Camp Darby, an American military base just outside town, accounts for the availability of many American products.

On one of the best stretches of the Mediterranean, this classic luxury destination is one of the most sought-after addresses in the world. With all the high-rise towers you have to look hard to find the Belle Époque grace of yesteryear. But if you head to the town's great 1864 landmark Hôtel de Paris—still a veritable crossroads of the buffed and befurred Euro-gentry—or enjoy a grand bouffe at its famous Louis XV restaurant, or attend the opera, or visit the ballrooms of the casino, you may still be able to conjure up Monaco's elegant past. Prince Albert II, a political science graduate from Amherst College, traces his ancestry to Otto Canella, who was born in 1070. The Grimaldi dynasty began with Otto's great-great-great-grandson, Francesco Grimaldi, also known as Frank the Rogue. Expelled from Genoa, Frank and his cronies disguised themselves as monks and in 1297 seized the fortified medieval town known today as Le Rocher (the Rock). Except for a short break under Napoléon, the Grimaldis have been here ever since, which makes them the oldest reigning family in Europe. In the 1850s a Grimaldi named Charles III made a decision that turned the Rock into a giant blue chip. Needing revenue but not wanting to impose additional taxes on his subjects, he contracted with a company to open a gambling facility. The first spin of the roulette wheel was on December 14, 1856. There was no easy way to reach Monaco then—no carriage roads or railroads—so no one came. Between March 15 and March 20, 1857, one person entered the casino—and won two francs. In 1868, however, the railroad reached Monaco, and it was filled with Englishmen who came to escape the London fog. The effects were immediate. Profits were so great that Charles eventually abolished all direct taxes. Almost overnight, a threadbare principality became an elegant watering hole for European society. Dukes (and their mistresses) and duchesses (and their gigolos) danced and dined their way through a world of spinning roulette wheels and bubbling champagne—preening themselves for nights at the opera, where such artists as Vaslav Nijinsky, Sarah Bernhardt, and Enrico Caruso came to perform. Along with the tax system, its sensational position on a broad, steep peninsula that bulges into the Mediterranean—its harbor sparkling with luxury cruisers, its posh mansions angling awnings toward the nearly perpetual sun—continues to draw the rich and famous. One of the latest French celebrities to declare himself "Monégasque," thus giving up his French passport, is superchef Alain Ducasse, who said that he made the choice out of affection for Monaco rather than tax reasons. Pleasure boats vie with luxury cruisers in their brash beauty and Titanic scale, and teams of handsome young men—themselves dyed blond and tanned to match—scour and polish every gleaming surface. As you might expect, all this glitz doesn't come cheap. Eating is expensive, and even the most modest hotels cost more here than in nearby Nice or Menton. As for taxis, they don't even have meters so you are completely at the driver's mercy (with prices skyrocketing during events such as the Grand Prix). For the frugal, Monaco is the ultimate day-trip, although parking is as coveted as a room with a view. At the very least you can afford a coffee at Starbucks. The harbor district, known as La Condamine, connects the new quarter, officially known as Monte Carlo with Monaco-Ville (or Le Rocher), a medieval town on the Rock, topped by the palace, the cathedral, and the Oceanography Museum. Have no fear that you'll need to climb countless steps to get to Monaco-Ville, as there are plenty of elevators and escalators climbing the steep cliffs. But shuttling between the lovely casino grounds of Monte Carlo and Old Monaco, separated by a vast port, is a daunting proposition for ordinary mortals without wings, so hop on the No. 1 bus from Saint Roman, or No. 2 from the Jardin Exotique - Both stop at Place du Casino and come up to Monaco Ville.

Considered Corsica’s primary commercial and cultural hub, the largest city and regional capital of Ajaccio is situated on the west coast of the island, approximately 644 km (400 miles) southeast of Marseille, France. Founded in 1492, vestiges of ancient Corsica in this ville impériale revolve around the city’s most famous son, Napoléon Bonaparte, whose family home—now the national museum Maison Bonaparte—pays tribute to the emperor’s historical influence.Remnants from what was originally a 12th-century Genoese colony are still visible around the Old Town near the imposing citadel and watchtower. Perfect for exploring, the luminous seaside city surrounded by snowcapped mountains and pretty beaches offers numerous sites, eateries, side streets, and a popular harbor, where sailboats and fishing vessels moor in the picturesque Tino Rossi port lined with well-established restaurants and cafés serving fresh local fare.

Day 7At Sea

Valletta, Malta's capital, has ornate palaces and museums protected by massive fortifications of honey-colour limestone. The main entrance to town is through the City Gate (where all bus routes end), which leads onto Triq Repubblika (Republic Street), the spine of the grid-pattern city and the main shopping street. Triq Mercante (Merchant Street) parallels Repubblika to the east and is also good for strolling. From these two streets, cross streets descend toward the water; some are stepped. Valletta's compactness makes it ideal to explore on foot. Cruise ships dock in the Valletta Waterfront, a short distance from the centre of the city – however, the route is uphill, so bare in mind if you're going to walk from the ship.

Valletta, Malta viewed from the Mediterranean Sea

Day 9At Sea

Athens is the birthplace of the modern western world, home to magnificent wonders including the Parthenon, the Acropolis, the Temples of Olympian Zeus and Athena Nike, and the most impressive collection of ancient artefacts at the Archaeological Museum. Athens effortlessly blends its ancient historic landmarks with a youthful, modern energy with chic rooftop bars, eclectic shopping destinations and a bustling art scene. Piraeus is the gateway to Athens for cruise visitors, which is easily accessible by public transport.

Whilst the busy resort town of Kusadasi offers much in the way of shopping and dining – not to mention a flourishing beach life scene, the real jewel here is Ephesus and the stunning ruined city that really take centre stage. With only 20% of the classical ruins having been excavated, this archaeological wonder has already gained the status as Europe’s most complete classical metropolis. And a metropolis it really is; built in the 10th century BC this UNESCO World Heritage site is nothing short of spectacular. Although regrettably very little remains of the Temple of Artemis (one of the seven wonders of the ancient world), the superb Library of Celsus’ façade is practically intact and it is one of life’s great joys to attend an evening performance in the illuminated ruins once all the tourists have left. The history of the city is fascinating and multi-layered and it is well worth reading up on this beforehand if a visit is planned. Another point of interest for historians would be the house of the Virgin Mary, located on the romantically named Mount Nightingale and just nine kilometres away from Ephesus proper. Legend has it that Mary (along with St. John) spent her final years here, secluded from the rest of the population, spreading Christianity. An edifying experience, even for non-believers. For the less historical minded amongst you, Kusadasi offers plenty in the way of activities. After a stroll through the town, jump in a taxi to Ladies’ Beach (men are allowed), sample a Turkish kebap on one of the many beachfront restaurants and enjoy the clement weather. If you do want to venture further afield, then the crystal clear beaches of Guzelcamli (or the Millipark), the cave of Zeus and the white scalloped natural pools at Pamukkale, known as Cleopatra’s pools, are definitely worth a visit.

Early travellers described Rhodes as a town of two parts: a castle or high town (Collachium) and a lower city. Today Rhodes town—sometimes referred to as Ródos town—is still a city of two parts: the Old Town, a UNESCO World Heritage site that incorporates the high town and lower city, and the modern metropolis, or New Town, spreading away from the walls that encircle the Old Town. The narrow streets of the Old Town are for the most part closed to cars and are lined with Orthodox and Catholic churches, Turkish houses (some of which follow the ancient orthogonal plan), and medieval public buildings with exterior staircases and facades elegantly constructed of well-cut limestone from Lindos. Careful reconstruction in recent years has enhanced the harmonious effect.

Undoubtedly the most extraordinary island in the Aegean, crescent-shape Santorini remains a mandatory stop on the Cycladic tourist route—even if it's necessary to enjoy the sensational sunsets from Ia, the fascinating excavations, and the dazzling white towns with a million other travellers. Fira, the capital of the island, is a busy city packed with shops, museums, bars, tavernas, resorts, and nightclubs. Cruise ships anchor at sea and tender their passengers to the base of the Caldera Cliffs in Fira – warning: it's a steep walk up, many opt for the cable car instead!

The iconic blue domes of Santorini Island, Greece

Day 14At Sea

Valletta, Malta's capital, has ornate palaces and museums protected by massive fortifications of honey-colour limestone. The main entrance to town is through the City Gate (where all bus routes end), which leads onto Triq Repubblika (Republic Street), the spine of the grid-pattern city and the main shopping street. Triq Mercante (Merchant Street) parallels Repubblika to the east and is also good for strolling. From these two streets, cross streets descend toward the water; some are stepped. Valletta's compactness makes it ideal to explore on foot. Cruise ships dock in the Valletta Waterfront, a short distance from the centre of the city – however, the route is uphill, so bare in mind if you're going to walk from the ship.

Valletta, Malta viewed from the Mediterranean Sea

The ship Azura

As P&O’s largest cruise ship, Azura is a family friendly resort ship, with a huge choice of bars, restaurants and unique entertainment options.

Capacity
3100
Cabins
1557
Total crew
1250
Length
853m

Food and drink

Dining takes centre stage on board Azura. Enjoy three main restaurants offering a choice of Club Dining - the same table at the same time each evening - or Freedom Dining with no fixed seating or dining times. There’s also the opportunity to visit the Select Dining venues of Sindhu, the first restaurant at sea from master of spices Atul Kochhar; Epicurean, where a sense of occasion is always on the menu; and The Glass House, a wine bar and restaurant created in partnership with award-winning wine guru Olly Smith.

Meridian Restaurant

Like to escape the usual routine on holiday? Then you’ll love the flexibility of Freedom Dining at the Meridian Restaurant. Opt for an... Read more

Complimentary
Classic

Java

Java coffee bar has an almost dual personality. Its comfortable seating and sofas set a relaxing atmosphere during the day, serving speciality... Read more

Cover
Cafe

Venezia

The main self-service restaurant offers high quality dining throughout the day in a relaxed, informal environment. So if you've just returned to... Read more

Complimentary
Buffet

Verona

During the day this family-friendly venue is a self-service food court offering everything you need for a relaxing meal.

In the evening, it... Read more

Complimentary
Varies

The Glass House

If you enjoy a glass of wine with your meal you'll want to visit to The Glass House.

On the venue's signature menu,... Read more

Cover
Wine

Sindhu

Sindhu will showcase an elegant fusion of Indian and British cuisine featuring sublime flavours. The Soft Shell Crab and Squid Salad is... Read more

Cover
Indian

The Peninsular Restaurant

Freedom Dining at the Peninsular Restaurant- Enjoy elegant surroundings, silver service and a warm, convivial atmosphere. This is classic P&O Cruises dining at... Read more

Complimentary
Classic

The Oriental Restaurant

Take your seat in the Oriental Restaurant- Choose a particular Club Dining seating and you’ll dine at the same time and table each... Read more

Complimentary
Classic

Afternoon Tea

Treat yourself to a classic English afternoon tea, served daily in the main restaurants. You can enjoy a selection of finger sandwiches,... Read more

Complimentary
Cafe

Poolside Snacks

Peckish by the pool? All that swimming and lounging can be hungry work, but there's plenty of pool side snacks to choose from...

... Read more

Complimentary
Fast

The Epicurean

A sense of occasion is permanently on the menu at The Epicurean. Here you will find a selection of much loved classic dishes.... Read more

Complimentary
Classic

Entertainment

There's never a dull moment...

P&O Cruises offers the very best in cruise entertainment. Days can be filled with as much or as little as you want, whilst evenings are no doubt the social highlight. When the sun goes down your ship begins to come alive with the hum of conversation and music, and you can be sure of a memorable night.

SeaScreen Open Air Cinema

Imagine watching a film under a starry, night sky, while being magically transported to another new destination. SeaScreen is one of the... Read more

The Playhouse

As soon as you enter Azura's 800 seat, two tier theatre immediately your expectations begin to build. And rightly so. With multiple... Read more

Manhattan

Enjoy spectacular cabaret performances, fun quiz shows, tribute acts, family shows and glittering discos. With so much to see and do on... Read more

Malabar

The exotic vibe of Malabar is inspired by the contemporary hotels on Marine Drive, Mumbai. It's a blend of modern Indian sophistication.... Read more

Monte Carlo Casino

The Monte Carlo Casino it a great place to continue a fun night out after post dinner drinks or a show. It... Read more

Brodie's Bar

A Classic London inspired pub with a contemporary twist. With its intimate atmosphere, stylish design and great selection of beers and ales,... Read more

Planet Bar

This chic venue boasts a unique audiovisual plasma wall screening iconic, man-made and natural wonders from the world's continents. While your eyes... Read more

The Blue Bar

Located proudly at the top of the Atrium, The Blue Bar is well positioned in the social hub of Azura. Featuring a... Read more

Health and fitness

From the revitalising hydrotherapy pool, to the state of the art gymnasium, there's plenty of facilities onboard to refresh your mind, body and soul. Passengers can enjoy luxury massages and treatments in the Oasis Spa, or head out to the top deck sports court for a spot of tennis.

Sports Court

Whether you enjoy the friendly competition of an organised tournament or prefer to play casually with your own party, short tennis, football,... Read more

Oasis Spa

Putting the aah in spa. Think luxurious spaces to relax in, thermal suites, salon treatments and the aroma of scented oils...

Some of... Read more

Gymnasium

It’s easy to keep active on Azura. Work out in her gym, take a spinning class, or a nice walk around deck.... Read more

Salon

The fully equipped salon is the perfect place for those who want to look their best. Located in the spa, passengers can... Read more

The Retreat

Spa treatments with a sea breeze. The Retreat is an alfresco spa terrace. By day, sit back and relax on one of... Read more

Swimming Pools

Get ready for some family fun on deck...

Azura family friendly pools;

  • Aqua pool - Outdoor pool. 1.6 metres to 2.2 metres deep.... Read more

Kids and teens

As a family friendly ship, Azura offers a wide range of options for the whole family, including a variety of just-for-kids activities.

The Reef

The Reef children’s club caters for all ages, combining fun with education and a whole host of activities organized daily by qualified... Read more

Night Nursery

The Night Nursery is a complimentary service available for children aged between 6 months and 4 years of age, and is open... Read more

Enrichment

The ship's fantastic New Horizons programme offers to passengers the chance to leave their cruise with a new hobby, skill or passion. With classes ranging from cookery, and ballroom dancing, to feng shui and tai chi, passengers can search for true enlightenment.

Library

The ship's well-stocked library is perfect for finding a great book to enjoy by the pool. Choose from an extensive range of... Read more

Family Shore Excursions

A whole range of tours have been designed especially for families, meaning your time ashore will be as stress free as the... Read more

Dance Classes

There are coupled dance instructors onboard who offer a variety of dance lessons. The main types of dance offered are ballroom and... Read more

Useful info

Special Dietary Requirements

The ship can cater for the following diets; vegetarian, low /no fat, low salt /no salt, lactose intolerant /dairy free, gluten /wheat... Read more

Disabled Facilites

Fully accessible adapted cabins and suites are available, which are suitable for wheelchair / mobility scooter users. Passengers with a disability which... Read more

Age Restrictions

They are unable to carry babies under the age of six months on any of their holidays. Children under the age of... Read more

Dress Code

The ship operates three styles of dress code: Smart, Evening Casual and Black Tie.

On Smart evenings ladies typically wear tailored trousers and... Read more

Smoking & E-cigarette Policy

There are dedicated areas onboard where smoking is permitted. Smoking is not permitted in any public room, inside cabin or on cabin... Read more

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* Passengers should be aged under 18 at the time of embarkation to qualify as a child.
Prices shown are per person based on two people sharing (unless otherwise specfied) in GBP and subject to availability. Certain restrictions can apply. Prices are updated on a daily basis and may vary when continuing through the booking process.