Norwegian Cruise Line

10-night British Isles Round-trip Amsterdam

Norwegian Jade

Your dream vacation is waiting on the Norwegian Jade. Sail on a Mediterranean cruise and explore castles, cathedrals, romantic islands and sophisticated cities of Europe. Or toss your schedule to the breeze on a Caribbean Cruise and bask on pristine beaches while enjoying island cocktails.

Explore the ship
Itinerary highlights
Amsterdam Netherlands
Edinburgh Castle, Edinburgh Edinburgh United Kingdom
Urquhart Castle, Loch Ness in Scotland Invergordon United Kingdom
Ship highlights
Photo of the Cagney's Steakhouse Cagney's Steakhouse
Photo of the Card Room/Lifestyle Room Card Room/Lifestyle Room
Photo of the The Chapel The Chapel
from
£993
per person
from
£99
per night
Free cancellation up to 15 days before you sail through Oct 2021
Eligible for Free At Sea upgrade
6 Jun 2021
£1,269 £993
6 Jun 2021
£1,719 £1,098
6 Jun 2021
£1,839 £1,560
6 Jun 2021
£2,119 £1,819
Book from £993 Email me this cruise

Peace of Mind

Cancel your cruise for free up to 15 days before your sail date and get a future cruise credit valid for sailings through December 2022.

Find out more

The itinerary

Amsterdam combines the unrivaled beauty of the 17th-century Golden Age city center with plenty of museums and art of the highest order, not to mention a remarkably laid-back atmosphere. It all comes together to make this one of the world's most appealing and offbeat metropolises in the world. Built on a latticework of concentric canals like an aquatic rainbow, Amsterdam is known as the City of Canals—but it's no Venice, content to live on moonlight serenades and former glory. Quite the contrary: on nearly every street here you'll find old and new side by side—quiet corners where time seems to be holding its breath next to streets like neon-lit Kalverstraat, and Red Light ladies strutting by the city's oldest church. Indeed, Amsterdam has as many lovely facets as a 40-carat diamond polished by one of the city's gem cutters. It's certainly a metropolis, but a rather small and very accessible one. Locals tend to refer to it as a big village, albeit one that happens to pack the cultural wallop of a major world destination. There are scores of concerts every day, numerous museums, summertime festivals, and, of course, a legendary year-round party scene. It's pretty much impossible to resist Amsterdam's charms. With 7,000 registered monuments, most of which began as the residences and warehouses of humble merchants, set on 160 man-made canals, and traversed by 1,500 or so bridges, Amsterdam has the largest historical inner city in Europe. Its famous circle of waterways, the grachtengordel, was a 17th-century urban expansion plan for the rich and is a lasting testament to the city’s Golden Age. This town is endearing because of its kinder, gentler nature—but a reputation for championing sex, drugs, and rock ’n’ roll does not alone account for Amsterdam's being one of the most popular destinations in Europe: consider that within a single square mile the city harbors some of the greatest achievements in Western art, from Rembrandt to Van Gogh. Not to mention that this is one of Europe's great walking cities, with so many of its treasures in the untouted details: tiny alleyways barely visible on the map, hidden garden courtyards, shop windows, floating houseboats, hidden hofjes(courtyards with almshouses), sudden vistas of church spires, and gabled roofs that look like so many unframed paintings. And don’t forget that the joy lies in details: elaborate gables and witty gable stones denoting the trade of a previous owner. Keep in mind that those XXX symbols you see all over town are not a mark of the city's triple-X reputation. They're part of Amsterdam's official coat of arms—three St. Andrew's crosses, believed to represent the three dangers that have traditionally plagued the city: flood, fire, and pestilence. The coat's motto ("Valiant, determined, compassionate") was introduced in 1947 by Queen Wilhelmina in remembrance of the 1941 February Strike in Amsterdam—the first time in Europe that non-Jewish people protested against the persecution of Jews by the Nazi regime.

Day 2At Sea

Edinburgh is to London as poetry is to prose, as Charlotte Brontë once wrote. One of the world's stateliest cities and proudest capitals, it's built—like Rome—on seven hills, making it a striking backdrop for the ancient pageant of history. In a skyline of sheer drama, Edinburgh Castle watches over the capital city, frowning down on Princes Street’s glamour and glitz. But despite its rich past, the city’s famous festivals, excellent museums and galleries, as well as the modern Scottish Parliament, are reminders that Edinburgh has its feet firmly in the 21st century.Nearly everywhere in Edinburgh (the burgh is always pronounced burra in Scotland) there are spectacular buildings, whose Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian pillars add touches of neoclassical grandeur to the largely Presbyterian backdrop. Large gardens are a strong feature of central Edinburgh, where the city council is one of the most stridently conservationist in Europe. Arthur's Seat, a mountain of bright green and yellow furze, rears up behind the spires of the Old Town. This child-size mountain jutting 822 feet above its surroundings has steep slopes and little crags, like a miniature Highlands set down in the middle of the busy city. Appropriately, these theatrical elements match Edinburgh's character—after all, the city has been a stage that has seen its fair share of romance, violence, tragedy, and triumph.Modern Edinburgh has become a cultural capital, staging the Edinburgh International Festival and the Fringe Festival in every possible venue each August. The stunning Museum of Scotland complements the city’s wealth of galleries and artsy hangouts. Add Edinburgh’s growing reputation for food and nightlife and you have one of the world’s most beguiling cities.Today the city is the second most important financial center in the United Kingdom, and the fifth most important in Europe. The city regularly is ranked near the top in quality-of-life surveys. Accordingly, New Town apartments on fashionable streets sell for considerable sums. In some senses the city is showy and materialistic, but Edinburgh still supports learned societies, some of which have their roots in the Scottish Enlightenment. The Royal Society of Edinburgh, for example, established in 1783 "for the advancement of learning and useful knowledge," remains an important forum for interdisciplinary activities.Even as Edinburgh moves through the 21st century, its tall guardian castle remains the focal point of the city and its venerable history. Take time to explore the streets—peopled by the spirits of Mary, Queen of Scots; Sir Walter Scott; and Robert Louis Stevenson—and pay your respects to the world's best-loved terrier, Greyfriars Bobby. In the evenings you can enjoy candlelit restaurants or a folk ceilidh (pronounced kay-lee, a traditional Scottish dance with music), though you should remember that you haven't earned your porridge until you've climbed Arthur's Seat. Should you wander around a corner, say, on George Street, you might see not an endless cityscape, but blue sea and a patchwork of fields. This is the county of Fife, beyond the inlet of the North Sea called the Firth of Forth—a reminder, like the mountains to the northwest that can be glimpsed from Edinburgh's highest points, that the rest of Scotland lies within easy reach.

Edinburgh Castle, Edinburgh

The port of Invergordon is your gateway to the Great Glen, an area of Scotland that includes Loch Ness and the city of Inverness. Inverness, the capital of the Highlands, has the flavor of a Lowland town, its winds blowing in a sea-salt air from the Moray Firth. The Great Glen is also home to one of the world's most famous monster myths: in 1933, during a quiet news week, the editor of a local paper decided to run a story about a strange sighting of something splashing about in Loch Ness. But there's more to look for here besides Nessie, including inland lochs, craggy and steep-sided mountains, rugged promontories, deep inlets, brilliant purple and emerald moorland, and forests filled with astonishingly varied wildlife, including mountain hares, red deer, golden eagles, and ospreys.

Urquhart Castle, Loch Ness in Scotland

In bustling Kirkwall, the main town on Orkney, there's plenty to see in the narrow, winding streets extending from the harbor. The cathedral and some museums are highlights.

The town of Kirkwall on the Orkney Islands

Trendy stores, a booming cultural life, fascinating architecture, and stylish restaurants reinforce Glasgow's claim to being Scotland's most exciting city. After decades of decline, it has experienced an urban renaissance uniquely its own. The city’s grand architecture reflects a prosperous past built on trade and shipbuilding. Today buildings by Charles Rennie Mackintosh hold pride of place along with the Zaha Hadid–designed Riverside Museum.Glasgow (the "dear green place," as it was known) was founded some 1,500 years ago. Legend has it that the king of Strathclyde, irate about his wife's infidelity, had a ring he had given her thrown into the river Clyde. (Apparently she had passed it on to an admirer.) When the king demanded to know where the ring had gone, the distraught queen asked the advice of her confessor, St. Mungo. He suggested fishing for it—and the first salmon to emerge had the ring in its mouth. The moment is commemorated on the city's coat of arms.The medieval city expanded when it was given a royal license to trade; the current High Street was the main thoroughfare at the time. The vast profits from American cotton and tobacco built the grand mansions of the Merchant City in the 18th century. In the 19th century the river Clyde became the center of a vibrant shipbuilding industry, fed by the city’s iron and steel works. The city grew again, but its internal divisions grew at the same time. The West End harbored the elegant homes of the newly rich shipyard owners. Down by the river, areas like the infamous Gorbals, with its crowded slums, sheltered the laborers who built the ships. They came from the Highlands, expelled to make way for sheep, or from Ireland, where the potato famines drove thousands from their homes.During the 19th century the population grew from 80,000 to more than a million. And the new prosperity gave Glasgow its grand neoclassical buildings, such as those built by Alexander "Greek" Thomson, as well as the adventurous visionary buildings designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh and others who produced Glasgow’s Arts and Crafts movement. The City Chambers, built in 1888, are a proud statement in marble and gold sandstone, a clear symbol of the wealthy and powerful Victorian industrialists' hopes for the future.The decline of shipbuilding and the closure of the factories led to much speculation as to what direction the city would take now. The curious thing is that, at least in part, the past gave the city a new lease of life. It was as if people looked at their city and saw Glasgow’s beauty for the first time: its extraordinarily rich architectural heritage, its leafy parks, its artistic heritage, and its complex social history. Today Glasgow is a vibrant cultural center and a commercial hub, as well as a launching pad from which to explore the rest of Scotland, which, as it turns out, is not so far away. In fact, it takes only 40 minutes to reach Loch Lomond, where the other Scotland begins.

Glasgow City Chambers, Glasgow

Dublin is making a comeback. The decade-long "Celtic Tiger" boom era was quickly followed by the Great Recession, but The Recovery has finally taken a precarious hold. For visitors, this newer and wiser Dublin has become one of western Europe's most popular and delightful urban destinations. Whether or not you're out to enjoy the old or new Dublin, you'll find it a colossally entertaining city, all the more astonishing considering its intimate size.It is ironic and telling that James Joyce chose Dublin as the setting for his famous Ulysses, Dubliners, and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man because it was a "center of paralysis" where nothing much ever changed. Which only proves that even the greats get it wrong sometimes. Indeed, if Joyce were to return to his once-genteel hometown today—disappointed with the city's provincial outlook, he left it in 1902 at the age of 20—and take a quasi-Homeric odyssey through the city (as he so famously does in Ulysses), would he even recognize Dublin as his "Dear Dirty Dumpling, foostherfather of fingalls and dotthergills"?For instance, what would he make of Temple Bar—the city's erstwhile down-at-the-heels neighborhood, now crammed with cafés and trendy hotels and suffused with a nonstop, international-party atmosphere? Or the simple sophistication of the open-air restaurants of the tiny Italian Quarter (named Quartier Bloom after his own creation), complete with sultry tango lessons? Or of the hot–cool Irishness, where every aspect of Celtic culture results in sold-out theaters, from Once, the cult indie movie and Broadway hit, to Riverdance, the old Irish mass-jig recast as a Las Vegas extravaganza? Plus, the resurrected Joyce might be stirred by the songs of Hozier, fired up by the sultry acting of Michael Fassbender, and moved by the award-winning novels of Colum McCann. As for Ireland's capital, it's packed with elegant shops and hotels, theaters, galleries, coffeehouses, and a stunning variety of new, creative little restaurants can be found on almost every street in Dublin, transforming the provincial city that suffocated Joyce into a place almost as cosmopolitan as the Paris to which he fled. And the locals are a hell of a lot more fun! Now that the economy has finally turned a corner, Dublin citizens can cast a cool eye over the last 20 crazy years. Some argue that the boomtown transformation of their heretofore-tranquil city has permanently affected its spirit and character. These skeptics (skepticism long being a favorite pastime in the capital city) await the outcome of "Dublin: The Sequel," and their greatest fear is the possibility that the tattered old lady on the Liffey has become a little less unique, a little more like everywhere else.Oh ye of little faith: the rare ole gem that is Dublin is far from buried. The fundamentals—the Georgian elegance of Merrion Square, the Norman drama of Christ Church Cathedral, the foamy pint at an atmospheric pub—are still on hand to gratify. Most of all, there are the locals themselves: the nod and grin when you catch their eye on the street, the eagerness to hear half your life story before they tell you all of theirs, and their paradoxically dark but warm sense of humor. It's expected that 2016 will be an extra-special year in the capital, as centenary celebrations of the fateful 1916 Easter Rising will dominate much of the cultural calendar.

Samuel Beckett Bridge in Dublin, Ireland

Once a northern defense post against Irish raiders, Holyhead later became best known as a ferry port for Ireland. The dockside bustle is not matched by the town, however, which maintains just a small population. Nonetheless, thousands of years of settlement have given Holyhead rich historical ruins to explore, with more in the surrounding hiking friendly landscape.

Porth Dafarch, Holyhead, United Kingdom

Day 9At Sea

Known as the gateway of England, Dover welcomes millions of visitors from all over the globe each year in its role as the ferry capital of the world and the second busiest cruise port in the UK. The White Cliffs Country has a rich heritage. Within the walls of the town’s iconic castle, over 2,000 years of history waits to be explored, whilst the town’s museum is home to the Dover Bronze Age Boat, the world’s oldest known seagoing vessel. The town’s cliffs that are a welcome sight for today's cross-channel travellers also served as the control centre for the Dunkirk evacuation in 1940.

The famous White Cliffs of Dover, United Kingdom

Amsterdam combines the unrivaled beauty of the 17th-century Golden Age city center with plenty of museums and art of the highest order, not to mention a remarkably laid-back atmosphere. It all comes together to make this one of the world's most appealing and offbeat metropolises in the world. Built on a latticework of concentric canals like an aquatic rainbow, Amsterdam is known as the City of Canals—but it's no Venice, content to live on moonlight serenades and former glory. Quite the contrary: on nearly every street here you'll find old and new side by side—quiet corners where time seems to be holding its breath next to streets like neon-lit Kalverstraat, and Red Light ladies strutting by the city's oldest church. Indeed, Amsterdam has as many lovely facets as a 40-carat diamond polished by one of the city's gem cutters. It's certainly a metropolis, but a rather small and very accessible one. Locals tend to refer to it as a big village, albeit one that happens to pack the cultural wallop of a major world destination. There are scores of concerts every day, numerous museums, summertime festivals, and, of course, a legendary year-round party scene. It's pretty much impossible to resist Amsterdam's charms. With 7,000 registered monuments, most of which began as the residences and warehouses of humble merchants, set on 160 man-made canals, and traversed by 1,500 or so bridges, Amsterdam has the largest historical inner city in Europe. Its famous circle of waterways, the grachtengordel, was a 17th-century urban expansion plan for the rich and is a lasting testament to the city’s Golden Age. This town is endearing because of its kinder, gentler nature—but a reputation for championing sex, drugs, and rock ’n’ roll does not alone account for Amsterdam's being one of the most popular destinations in Europe: consider that within a single square mile the city harbors some of the greatest achievements in Western art, from Rembrandt to Van Gogh. Not to mention that this is one of Europe's great walking cities, with so many of its treasures in the untouted details: tiny alleyways barely visible on the map, hidden garden courtyards, shop windows, floating houseboats, hidden hofjes(courtyards with almshouses), sudden vistas of church spires, and gabled roofs that look like so many unframed paintings. And don’t forget that the joy lies in details: elaborate gables and witty gable stones denoting the trade of a previous owner. Keep in mind that those XXX symbols you see all over town are not a mark of the city's triple-X reputation. They're part of Amsterdam's official coat of arms—three St. Andrew's crosses, believed to represent the three dangers that have traditionally plagued the city: flood, fire, and pestilence. The coat's motto ("Valiant, determined, compassionate") was introduced in 1947 by Queen Wilhelmina in remembrance of the 1941 February Strike in Amsterdam—the first time in Europe that non-Jewish people protested against the persecution of Jews by the Nazi regime.

The ship Norwegian Jade

Your dream vacation is waiting on the Norwegian Jade. Sail on a Mediterranean cruise and explore castles, cathedrals, romantic islands and sophisticated cities of Europe. Or toss your schedule to the breeze on a Caribbean Cruise and bask on pristine beaches while enjoying island cocktails.

Capacity
2402
Total crew
1078
Length
965m

Food and drink

Every cruise fare includes beautifully crafted menus in our two main dining rooms, a help-yourself buffet and a variety of casual cafés, grills and on-the-go choices. From fresh-baked breads, desserts and pastries to our chefs' original dishes made with the freshest ingredients, your dining can be as fine or fun as you want.

Cagney's Steakhouse

Steak is the standard at the American-style steakhouse. Select from choice cuts of Black Angus perfectly prepared like traditional T-bone or tender... Read more

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Steakhouse

Garden Café / Kid's Café

Made-to-order action stations, always-changing menu options, a fresh salad bar and a dessert bar make this way more than a traditional buffet.

Complimentary
Buffet

La Cucina Italian Restaurant

Buona Sera! Enjoy the finest ingredients at our vibrant Italian ristorante. Dine on classics like pasta carbonara or osso buco with gremolata.... Read more

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Italian

Le Bistro French Restaurant

Norwegian's signature French restaurant featuring Mediterranean, nouveau and classic French cusine.

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French

Moderno

If you’re looking for a unique experience, the authentic Brazilian steakhouse is a must. Start with an impressive salad bar of imported... Read more

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Bbq

Room Service

Available 24 hours a day, simply pick up the phone and order breakfast, lunch, dinner or late-night munchies. A convenience charge of... Read more

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Room

Jasmine Garden

Enjoy a complimentary Asian Fusion dining venue featuring freshly prepared noodles, delicious wok fried dishes, authentic soups, and more.

Complimentary
Asian

Teppanyaki

Flying shrimp. Onion volcanoes. Twirling knives. The sizzles and surprises never cease at the authentic Japanese Hibachi restaurant. Sit around a lively... Read more

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Japanese

Topsiders Bar & Grill

Topsiders is located on deck near the Pool and offers a full bar and grill in close proximity to ample sun beds... Read more

Complimentary
Bbq

Alizar Main Dining Room

Dine in this intimate and inviting Main Restaurant offering the beautifully crafted Main Dining Room menus showcasing a variety of entrees and... Read more

Complimentary
Varies

O'Sheehan's

Dine on reinvented Irish pub classics while sipping on your favourite draft beer, all in a casual atmosphere open 24 hours a... Read more

Complimentary
American

Grand Pacific Main Dining Room

A first class dining experience in the grand tradition of the luxury ocean liners of yesteryear, Grand Pacific offers beautifully crafted contemporary... Read more

Complimentary
Fine

Entertainment

You won’t believe your eyes or even your ears. Norgwegian Cruise Lines have brought Broadway to sea with blockbuster shows, music, dancing, cabaret, comedy and more. You can party all night, grab some great casino action and find your favourites among up to 22 bars and lounges, from electrifying nightspots to cosmopolitan bars and easy-going pubs. Every night is a night on the town.

Jade Club Casino & Bar

Try your hand at Roulette, Blackjack, Craps and Let It Ride® against a backdrop of travelling circuses from the turn of the... Read more

Stardust Theatre

It's show time! And they've got a really big show for you at the Stardust. Enjoy Broadway and Vegas-style shows in a... Read more

Video Arcade

Stop by the video arcade and capture a few aliens, win a car race, play pinball and fly a jet fighter. Anything... Read more

Internet Café

No matter how far you are from home, having access to the Internet is always nearby at the Internet Café. Original works... Read more

Library

You'll find a well-stocked selection of things to read, along with a stellar ocean view.

Bliss Lounge

Cruise into the clubbing scene at Bliss. Dance to a different beat and feel the excitement as you walk through the lit... Read more

Magnums Champagne & WIne bar

Some moments just call for champagne. And this is the place to enjoy it. Magnum's features a French Art Deco motif combined... Read more

Maltings Beer & Whiskey Bar

Inspired by the lobby bar from the Mandarin Oriental in London, this contemporary full bar has low lounges and tables with the... Read more

Mixers Martini & Cocktail Bar

How do you like your martini? Shaken, not stirred? The bartender will make a point of knowing exactly what you like at... Read more

Spinnaker Lounge

Horizontal windows in the floor allow you to look down on the bridge. At night, the atmosphere is charged when the music... Read more

Sugarcane Mojito Bar

Freshly muddled just the way you like, enjoy a refreshing speciality Mojito with friends - day or night. 

Blazing Boots

Imagine yourself bellying up to the the best country bar at sea. You are all invited to Blazing Boots - a first-class... Read more

Elements

Come and experience ELEMENTS! From mesmerising magic to the visual feast of flying to exciting music and dance, this dazzling show will... Read more

Showdown

You be the judge! Four talented singers vie the audience's votes with a rocking Emcee that'll keep the show moving and you,... Read more

Health and fitness

Feel free to follow your spirit, whether that takes you to a superb fitness centre, a sun lounger by the pool or to the serenity of a luxurious spa. Get the adrenaline soaring by conquering the climbing wall or ropes course high above the ocean. Flex your muscles on the sports court or treat yourself to something special in the boutiques. Catch a fun, informal lecture. Take the plunge in the Aqua Park. 

Fitness Centre

There are numerous ways to stay in shape while onboard. The Fitness Centre is open from 6am to 11pm with a full... Read more

Hot Tubs

There are four hot tubs conveniently located throughout the ship. Try them all out or pick your favourite and make relaxing and... Read more

Jogging/Walking Track

Run circles around the other guests or get in your daily walk while you're at sea. Breakfast always tastes better after a... Read more

Pool

Dive into the shimmering Pool with slides and hot tubs nearby. Topsiders Bar & Grill is located poolside along with 323 deck... Read more

Basketball/Volleyball/Tennis Court

Shoot some hoops, play beach volleyball or a few sets of tennis at the net-enclosed outdoor sports court.

Mandara Health Spa & Beauty Salon

If being pampered is your idea of a vacation, the Mandara Spa is the place for you. This full service beauty salon... Read more

Spa Thermal Suite

The Thermal Suite offers a unique experience benefiting the mind and body. Feel the weightlessness and total relaxation created by the kneading... Read more

Kids and teens

Families play better together on Norwegian. From dodgeball to cupcake decorating, there are lots of activities all over the ships. Plus, with complimentary youth programmes, kids can learn to juggle at Circus School in Splash Academy and teens have the coolest themed parties in Entourage. Add exclusive NickelodeonTM entertainment at sea for kids of all ages – even the grown up ones – and your family holiday gets awesome. While the kids are having fun, so can you, indulging in a spa treatment, enjoying a leisurely meal or just switching off. And when it comes to bedtime, family-friendly accommodation gives everyone the elbow room they need. Night, night.

Sapphire Kid's Pool

The kid's pool is just right for pint-size splashing, playing and paddling. The pool also has additional fun features.

Entourage Teen's Club

The Teen club is made to look like Surfer's Paradise. This hip place for teens to hang out has plenty to do... Read more

Splash Academy Kid's Club

Jump into a splash of fun at Splash Academy just for kids 3-12. Join us for active games, arts and crafts, and... Read more

Enrichment

Check out the card room, walk around the art gallery, listen and learn in a lecture held by a guest speaker. Norwegian Cruise Line ships have much to offer to enhance your learning and senses.

Card Room/Lifestyle Room

Looking for a quiet place to write postcards, play cards or read a book? Drop by the LifeStyle Room.

The Chapel

This intimate on-board chapel also functions as a meeting room.

Art Gallery

Stroll through original works by a wide range of well-known artists – all for sale.

Useful info

Disabled Facilites

Guests who have mobility impairments should travel with someone who will take responsibility for any assistance needed during the cruise and in... Read more

Special Dietary Requirements

If you are on a low calorie diet, breakfast, lunch and dinner menus feature low calorie, haute cuisine dishes. Sugar-free and fat-free... Read more

Age Restrictions

Guests must be 21 years of age or older to purchase or consume alcohol. Norwegian Cruise Line permits young adults between 18... Read more

Smoking Policy

Public areas throughout all ships are smoke-free. If you smoke cigarettes, you can do so on your balcony, in the casino or... Read more

Dress Code

When it comes to what to wear, you can go resort casual or get decked-out and look your best - it’s your... Read more

Sail & Sustain - Our Commitment

We understand that protecting our environment and our oceans is not only vital to our industry but also to our planet. Our... Read more

Water Conservation & Management

Onboard Production

Onboard our vessels, water is primarily used by our guests and crew in their staterooms for showers, bathtubs and sinks but... Read more

Waste Mitigation

Our ships call on sensitive areas of the world, and we strive to lead by example as we strive to continue to... Read more

Fuel & Energy Efficiency

Climate change is one of the defining issues of our time. How governments, organisations and individuals choose to respond to it will... Read more

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Prices shown are per person based on two people sharing (unless otherwise specfied) in GBP and subject to availability. Certain restrictions can apply. Prices are updated on a daily basis and may vary when continuing through the booking process.