Princess Cruises

12-night British Isles with Portland (for Stonehenge)

Crown Princess

Featuring their latest innovations, Crown Princess is one of the largest Princess cruise ships, with room for 3,080 guests. 

Explore the ship
Itinerary highlights
Boats in Southampton Harbour Southampton United Kingdom
The iconic Stonehenge is accessible from the port of Portland, UK Portland United Kingdom
Bluebell woods on the island of Guernsey St Peter Port, Guernsey United Kingdom
Ship highlights
Photo of the Traditional Dining Room- Botticelli Dining Room Traditional Dining Room- Botticelli Dining Room
Photo of the Edutainment Edutainment
from
£1,099
per person
from
£92
per night
Free cancellation up to 30 days before you sail through 30 April 2021
25 Jul 2021
£1,599 £1,099
25 Jul 2021
£1,699 £1,199
25 Jul 2021
£1,999 £1,179
25 Jul 2021
£2,399 £1,599
Book from £1,099 Email me this cruise

Cruise with Confidence

Cancel your cruise for free up to 30 days before your sail date and get a future cruise credit in the amount of non-refundable fees (the remainder will be refunded to you). Applies to sailings departing through 30 April 2021.

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The itinerary

Southampton is the UK's largest and busiest cruise port, catering for over 1.5 million passengers every year. Located just a two hour drive out of London, or an 80-minute train journey, Southampton has a rich history on display across the city's museums and cultural venues, as well as leading shopping shopping outlets, many restaurants and bars, and award-winning public parks. Walking around the city centre, you'll see many remnants of the ancient city walls, don't miss the Bargate Monument – a Grade I-listed medieval gatehouse. Further afield, you can take in the sights of nearby cities of Portsmouth and Winchester, or visit the world-renowned heritage site of Stonehenge.

Boats in Southampton Harbour

Cobblestone streets, blooming floral displays, and tiny churches welcome you to this wonderfully pretty harbour. The town of St Peter Port is as pretty as they come, with glowing flower displays painting practically every street corner and window-ledge with colour. As the capital, and main port of Guernsey, St Peter Port puts all of the island’s gorgeous beaches, wonderful history and inspiring stories at your fingertips. Feel the gut punch of the midday gun firing at Castle Cornet, which stands guard over one of the world's prettiest ports. This 800-year-old, Medieval castle offers staggering views of the harbour from its imposing, craggy island location, and you can look out across to the looming shorelines of the other Channel Islands from its weathered battlements. With four well-tended gardens, and five museums offering a rich overview of Guernsey's history, you’ll want to leave a few hours aside to explore the many treasures that lie within the castle’s walls.

Bluebell woods on the island of Guernsey

Cork City received its first charter in 1185 from Prince John of Norman England, and it takes its name from the Irish word corcaigh, meaning "marshy place." The original 6th-century settlement was spread over 13 small islands in the River Lee. Major development occurred during the 17th and 18th centuries with the expansion of the butter trade, and many attractive Georgian-design buildings with wide bowfront windows were constructed during this time. As late as 1770 Cork's present-day main streets—Grand Parade, Patrick Street, and the South Mall—were submerged under the Lee. Around 1800, when the Lee was partially dammed, the river divided into two streams that now flow through the city, leaving the main business and commercial center on an island, not unlike Paris's Île de la Cité. As a result, the city has a number of bridges and quays, which, although initially confusing, add greatly to the port's unique character. Cork can be very "Irish" (hurling, Gaelic football, televised plowing contests, music pubs, and peat smoke). But depending on what part of town you're in, Cork can also be distinctly un-Irish—the sort of place where hippies, gays, and farmers drink at the same pub.

Blarney Castle, County Cork, Ireland

Dublin is making a comeback. The decade-long "Celtic Tiger" boom era was quickly followed by the Great Recession, but The Recovery has finally taken a precarious hold. For visitors, this newer and wiser Dublin has become one of western Europe's most popular and delightful urban destinations. Whether or not you're out to enjoy the old or new Dublin, you'll find it a colossally entertaining city, all the more astonishing considering its intimate size.It is ironic and telling that James Joyce chose Dublin as the setting for his famous Ulysses, Dubliners, and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man because it was a "center of paralysis" where nothing much ever changed. Which only proves that even the greats get it wrong sometimes. Indeed, if Joyce were to return to his once-genteel hometown today—disappointed with the city's provincial outlook, he left it in 1902 at the age of 20—and take a quasi-Homeric odyssey through the city (as he so famously does in Ulysses), would he even recognize Dublin as his "Dear Dirty Dumpling, foostherfather of fingalls and dotthergills"?For instance, what would he make of Temple Bar—the city's erstwhile down-at-the-heels neighborhood, now crammed with cafés and trendy hotels and suffused with a nonstop, international-party atmosphere? Or the simple sophistication of the open-air restaurants of the tiny Italian Quarter (named Quartier Bloom after his own creation), complete with sultry tango lessons? Or of the hot–cool Irishness, where every aspect of Celtic culture results in sold-out theaters, from Once, the cult indie movie and Broadway hit, to Riverdance, the old Irish mass-jig recast as a Las Vegas extravaganza? Plus, the resurrected Joyce might be stirred by the songs of Hozier, fired up by the sultry acting of Michael Fassbender, and moved by the award-winning novels of Colum McCann. As for Ireland's capital, it's packed with elegant shops and hotels, theaters, galleries, coffeehouses, and a stunning variety of new, creative little restaurants can be found on almost every street in Dublin, transforming the provincial city that suffocated Joyce into a place almost as cosmopolitan as the Paris to which he fled. And the locals are a hell of a lot more fun! Now that the economy has finally turned a corner, Dublin citizens can cast a cool eye over the last 20 crazy years. Some argue that the boomtown transformation of their heretofore-tranquil city has permanently affected its spirit and character. These skeptics (skepticism long being a favorite pastime in the capital city) await the outcome of "Dublin: The Sequel," and their greatest fear is the possibility that the tattered old lady on the Liffey has become a little less unique, a little more like everywhere else.Oh ye of little faith: the rare ole gem that is Dublin is far from buried. The fundamentals—the Georgian elegance of Merrion Square, the Norman drama of Christ Church Cathedral, the foamy pint at an atmospheric pub—are still on hand to gratify. Most of all, there are the locals themselves: the nod and grin when you catch their eye on the street, the eagerness to hear half your life story before they tell you all of theirs, and their paradoxically dark but warm sense of humor. It's expected that 2016 will be an extra-special year in the capital, as centenary celebrations of the fateful 1916 Easter Rising will dominate much of the cultural calendar.

Samuel Beckett Bridge in Dublin, Ireland

Before English and Scottish settlers arrived in the 1600s, Belfast was a tiny village called Béal Feirste ("sandbank ford") belonging to Ulster's ancient O'Neill clan. With the advent of the Plantation period (when settlers arrived in the 1600s), Sir Arthur Chichester, from Devon in southwestern England, received the city from the English Crown, and his son was made Earl of Donegall. Huguenots fleeing persecution from France settled near here, bringing their valuable linen-work skills. In the 18th century, Belfast underwent a phenomenal expansion—its population doubled every 10 years, despite an ever-present sectarian divide. Although the Anglican gentry despised the Presbyterian artisans—who, in turn, distrusted the native Catholics—Belfast's growth continued at a dizzying speed. The city was a great Victorian success story, an industrial boomtown whose prosperity was built on trade, especially linen and shipbuilding. Famously (or infamously), the Titanic was built here, giving Belfast, for a time, the nickname "Titanic Town." Having laid the foundation stone of the city's university in 1845, Queen Victoria returned to Belfast in 1849 (she is recalled in the names of buildings, streets, bars, monuments, and other places around the city), and in the same year, the university opened under the name Queen's College. Nearly 40 years later, in 1888, Victoria granted Belfast its city charter. Today its population is nearly 300,000, tourist numbers have increased, and this dramatically transformed city is enjoying an unparalleled renaissance.This is all a welcome change from the period when news about Belfast meant reports about "the Troubles." Since the 1994 ceasefire, Northern Ireland's capital city has benefited from major hotel investment, gentrified quaysides (or strands), a sophisticated new performing arts center, and major initiatives to boost tourism. Although the 1996 bombing of offices at Canary Wharf in London disrupted the 1994 peace agreement, the ceasefire was officially reestablished on July 20, 1997, and this embattled city began its quest for a newfound identity.Since 2008, the city has restored all its major public buildings such as museums, churches, theaters, City Hall, Ulster Hall—and even the glorious Crown Bar—spending millions of pounds on its built heritage. A gaol that at the height of the Troubles held some of the most notorious murderers involved in paramilitary violence is now a major visitor attraction.Belfast's city center is made up of three roughly contiguous areas that are easy to navigate on foot. From the south end to the north, it's about an hour's leisurely walk.

City Hall in Belfast, United Kingdom

Trendy stores, a booming cultural life, fascinating architecture, and stylish restaurants reinforce Glasgow's claim to being Scotland's most exciting city. After decades of decline, it has experienced an urban renaissance uniquely its own. The city’s grand architecture reflects a prosperous past built on trade and shipbuilding. Today buildings by Charles Rennie Mackintosh hold pride of place along with the Zaha Hadid–designed Riverside Museum.Glasgow (the "dear green place," as it was known) was founded some 1,500 years ago. Legend has it that the king of Strathclyde, irate about his wife's infidelity, had a ring he had given her thrown into the river Clyde. (Apparently she had passed it on to an admirer.) When the king demanded to know where the ring had gone, the distraught queen asked the advice of her confessor, St. Mungo. He suggested fishing for it—and the first salmon to emerge had the ring in its mouth. The moment is commemorated on the city's coat of arms.The medieval city expanded when it was given a royal license to trade; the current High Street was the main thoroughfare at the time. The vast profits from American cotton and tobacco built the grand mansions of the Merchant City in the 18th century. In the 19th century the river Clyde became the center of a vibrant shipbuilding industry, fed by the city’s iron and steel works. The city grew again, but its internal divisions grew at the same time. The West End harbored the elegant homes of the newly rich shipyard owners. Down by the river, areas like the infamous Gorbals, with its crowded slums, sheltered the laborers who built the ships. They came from the Highlands, expelled to make way for sheep, or from Ireland, where the potato famines drove thousands from their homes.During the 19th century the population grew from 80,000 to more than a million. And the new prosperity gave Glasgow its grand neoclassical buildings, such as those built by Alexander "Greek" Thomson, as well as the adventurous visionary buildings designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh and others who produced Glasgow’s Arts and Crafts movement. The City Chambers, built in 1888, are a proud statement in marble and gold sandstone, a clear symbol of the wealthy and powerful Victorian industrialists' hopes for the future.The decline of shipbuilding and the closure of the factories led to much speculation as to what direction the city would take now. The curious thing is that, at least in part, the past gave the city a new lease of life. It was as if people looked at their city and saw Glasgow’s beauty for the first time: its extraordinarily rich architectural heritage, its leafy parks, its artistic heritage, and its complex social history. Today Glasgow is a vibrant cultural center and a commercial hub, as well as a launching pad from which to explore the rest of Scotland, which, as it turns out, is not so far away. In fact, it takes only 40 minutes to reach Loch Lomond, where the other Scotland begins.

Glasgow City Chambers, Glasgow

Day 8At Sea

The port of Invergordon is your gateway to the Great Glen, an area of Scotland that includes Loch Ness and the city of Inverness. Inverness, the capital of the Highlands, has the flavor of a Lowland town, its winds blowing in a sea-salt air from the Moray Firth. The Great Glen is also home to one of the world's most famous monster myths: in 1933, during a quiet news week, the editor of a local paper decided to run a story about a strange sighting of something splashing about in Loch Ness. But there's more to look for here besides Nessie, including inland lochs, craggy and steep-sided mountains, rugged promontories, deep inlets, brilliant purple and emerald moorland, and forests filled with astonishingly varied wildlife, including mountain hares, red deer, golden eagles, and ospreys.

Urquhart Castle, Loch Ness in Scotland

Edinburgh is to London as poetry is to prose, as Charlotte Brontë once wrote. One of the world's stateliest cities and proudest capitals, it's built—like Rome—on seven hills, making it a striking backdrop for the ancient pageant of history. In a skyline of sheer drama, Edinburgh Castle watches over the capitalcity, frowning down on Princes Street’s glamour and glitz. But despite its rich past, the city’s famous festivals, excellent museums and galleries, as well as the modern Scottish Parliament, are reminders that Edinburgh has its feet firmly in the 21st century. Nearly everywhere in Edinburgh (the burgh is always pronounced burra in Scotland) there are spectacular buildings, whose Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian pillars add touches of neoclassical grandeur to the largely Presbyterian backdrop. Large gardens are a strong feature of central Edinburgh, where the city council is one of the most stridently conservationist in Europe. Arthur's Seat, a mountain of bright green and yellow furze, rears up behind the spires of the Old Town. This child-size mountain jutting 822 feet above its surroundings has steep slopes and little crags, like a miniature Highlands set down in the middle of the busy city. Appropriately, these theatrical elements match Edinburgh's character—after all, the city has been a stage that has seen its fair share of romance, violence, tragedy, and triumph. Modern Edinburgh has become a cultural capital, staging the Edinburgh International Festival and the Fringe Festival in every possible venue each August. The stunning Museum of Scotland complements the city’s wealth of galleries and artsy hangouts. Add Edinburgh’s growing reputation for food and nightlife and you have one of the world’s most beguiling cities. Today the city is the second most important financial center in the United Kingdom, and the fifth most important in Europe. The city regularly is ranked near the top in quality-of-life surveys. Accordingly, New Town apartments on fashionable streets sell for considerable sums. In some senses the city is showy and materialistic, but Edinburgh still supports learned societies, some of which have their roots in the Scottish Enlightenment. The Royal Society of Edinburgh, for example, established in 1783 "for the advancement of learning and useful knowledge," remains an important forum for interdisciplinary activities. Even as Edinburgh moves through the 21st century, its tall guardian castle remains the focal point of the city and its venerable history. Take time to explore the streets—peopled by the spirits of Mary, Queen of Scots; Sir Walter Scott; and Robert Louis Stevenson—and pay your respects to the world's best-loved terrier, Greyfriars Bobby. In the evenings you can enjoy candlelit restaurants or a folk ceilidh (pronounced kay-lee, a traditional Scottish dance with music), though you should remember that you haven't earned your porridge until you've climbed Arthur's Seat. Should you wander around a corner, say, on George Street, you might see not an endless cityscape, but blue sea and a patchwork of fields. This is the county of Fife, beyond the inlet of the North Sea called the Firth of Forth—a reminder, like the mountains to the northwest that can be glimpsed from Edinburgh's highest points, that the rest of Scotland lies within easy reach.

Carlton Hill and Edinburgh at sunset

Day 11At Sea

Le Havre, founded by King Francis I of France in 1517, is located inUpper Normandy on the north bank of the mouth of the River Seine, which isconsidered the most frequented waterway in the world. Its port is ranked thesecond largest in France. The city was originally built on marshland andmudflats that were drained in the 1500’s. During WWII most of Le Havre wasdestroyed by Allied bombing raids. Post war rebuilding of the city followed thedevelopment plans of the well-known Belgian architect Auguste Perre. Thereconstruction was so unique that the entire city was listed as a UNESCO WorldHeritage Site in 2005. 

Southampton is the UK's largest and busiest cruise port, catering for over 1.5 million passengers every year. Located just a two hour drive out of London, or an 80-minute train journey, Southampton has a rich history on display across the city's museums and cultural venues, as well as leading shopping shopping outlets, many restaurants and bars, and award-winning public parks. Walking around the city centre, you'll see many remnants of the ancient city walls, don't miss the Bargate Monument – a Grade I-listed medieval gatehouse. Further afield, you can take in the sights of nearby cities of Portsmouth and Winchester, or visit the world-renowned heritage site of Stonehenge.

Boats in Southampton Harbour

The ship Crown Princess

Featuring their latest innovations, Crown Princess is one of the largest Princess cruise ships, with room for 3,080 guests. 

Capacity
3080
Cabins
1541
Total crew
1200
Length
952m

Food and drink

The Princess chefs are true culinary artists who insist on serving the very finest cuisine - and it shows. The entire fleet has been inducted into the prestigious Chaîne des Rôtisseurs gastronomic society. Each chef's menu is creative and the selections change every day. Pair that with impeccable service and you're in for an unforgettable gourmet experience.

Afternoon Tea

All ships offer Princess’ trademark British-style afternoon tea daily, complete with tablecloths, gleaming Samovars, easy listening music in the background, and tea... Read more

Cover
British

Traditional Dining Room- Botticelli Dining Room

The Botticelli Dining room is the ship's traditional dining room allowing guests to eat at the same time and table each evening... Read more

Complimentary
Classic

Sabatini's

This Italian restaurant is a refined yet casual dining establishment rich in atmosphere, showcasing an Italian and Mediterranean menu with a heavy... Read more

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Italian

Crown Grill

Recently voted one of the "Best Cruise Ship Steakhouses" by USA Today, the Crown Grill features premium beef and seafood items, plus... Read more

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Surf Turf

Anytime Dining- Michaelangelo & Da Vinci Dining Rooms

Just like a restaurant at home, Anytime Dining enables guests the freedom to dine when and with whom they wish..

The Da Vinci... Read more

Complimentary
Classic

Casual Dining

Want to maximise your pool time and minimise your mealtime? Get a quick and satisfying bite whenever you like at our Casual... Read more

Complimentary
Pizzeria

Horizon Court Buffet

An expanded top-deck buffet featuring multiple live stations, Horizon Court offers a wide selection of buffet meals or snacks. A primary feature of... Read more

Buffet

Vines

Casual Dining at its best, a Wine, sushi and tapas bar. Voted one of the 'Best Wine Bars at Sea' by USA Today!

This... Read more

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Tapas

Ultimate Balcony Dining

Choose a luxurious breakfast or experience the "ultimate" romantic dinner at sea: a sumptuous four-course meal, including succulent lobster tail and juicy... Read more

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Room

International Café

The International Café, located on the 5th Deck, is open 24 hours a day and serves a selection of teas and coffees... Read more

Complimentary
Buffet

Chef's Table

The Chef's Table experience provides the chance to tour the ship's busy galley during dinner service, where the ship's executive chef previews... Read more

Cover
Classic

Wheelhouse Bar

Several times throughout the cruise, The ships' Wheelhouse Bar is transformed into an authentic English-style pub, serving a selection of traditional dishes.

A... Read more

Complimentary
British

The Salty Dog Gastropub

A warm, inviting gastropub experience developed with Ernesto Uchimura, a founding chef of the original Umami Burger. Try one of our innovative... Read more
Cover
American

Crab Shack

Seafood lovers won’t want to miss this full crab shack experience. An intriguing bistro option housed within the Horizon Court buffet, Crab... Read more
Cover
Seafood

The Salty Dog Grill

Treat yourself to one of our 100% handmade Gourmet Burgers, including our Princess Burger or Triple Smoked Burger. The Salty Dog Grill... Read more
Complimentary
American

Slice Pizzeria

Our top-deck pizzeria features a bold new look that sets the stage for tempting offerings that include specialties inspired by local favorites... Read more
Complimentary
Pizzeria

Entertainment

To say the night-life on-board is entertaining is an understatement. Illuminating the stage in captivating productions, Princess Cruises performers are some of the most talented musicians, singers and dancers at sea. Our Princess Signature Shows, lounge performers, movies and casinos are just some of the entertainment our guests enjoy as they escape completely.

Speakeasy Cigar Lounge

The designated cigar lounge where guests can relax with a premium cigar and cognac and enjoy sporting events aired on the TV... Read more

Internet Café

The internet is available onboard the ship either in the Internet Café on Deck 5 or via passengers' personal wi-fi devices. Charges apply.

Princess Theatre

Princess Cruises largest theatre yet, with sophisticated architectural lighting. West End-style shows are on every cruise, with more than one performance each... Read more

Movies Under The Stars

The 300 square foot outdoor movie theatre offers a unique opportunity to enjoy blockbuster movies against a backdrop of twinkling stars. Personal... Read more

Gatsby's Casino

Choose from 17 table games in this spacious casino, located on Deck 6. 

Featuring games tables including roulette, poker, craps and blackjack it... Read more

Explorer's Lounge

Explorers Lounge is one of the ship's three main entertainment venues.

Located midship on the 7th Deck, events held here range from Princess... Read more

Skywalker's Nightclub

A popular, top-deck nightclub- During the day its location makes it an ideal observation lounge to sit and enjoy the ever changing scenery.

Crooner's Bar

The Crooners Lounge and Bar, located midship on deck 7 opens from 1pm onwards and is reminiscent of a classic Martini bar.

Evening... Read more

Shops & Boutiques

The boutiques onboard offer more than just accessories and sundries you may have left at home. Shop onboard and benefit from incredible... Read more

Platinum Studio

The Platinum Studio, located on the 19th Deck in between the sports court and Princess Links mini golf, provides guests with the... Read more

Pool Bars

The Mermaids Tail bar serves the Neptune pool area and is located forward of the 14th Deck.

It also sells a small selection... Read more

Library

The ship's library is in the multi purpose internet cafe and library room on the 5th deck, featuring a range of books from... Read more

Club Fusion Lounge

Club Fusion on Deck 7, offers a range of activities for guests to participate in including trivia quizzes and dance classes during... Read more

Adagio Bar

The Adagio Bar is found next to Sabatini's Italian Restaurant on deck 16 and offers stunning views, making it the the ideal... Read more

Health and fitness

The many activities on-board our ships are designed to stimulate, educate, entertain, inspire and sweat - not necessarily in that order. But, guests can be sure crew onboard will do their best to cover all the bases. From art auctions to The Sanctuary Spa, this ship is loaded with fun things to do.

Pools & Hot tubs

Sometimes floating serenely just isn't enough - splash around, ride the waves, swim against the current or take a dip in one... Read more

Sports & Fitness Centre

This ship will keep you on the run, literally, with basketball, paddle tennis, jogging tracks and state-of-the-art gyms equipped with machines that'll... Read more

The Sanctuary

Leave stress at the door when you enter this blissful signature haven exclusively for adults. Perfect for that al fresco massage, feel... Read more

Lotus Spa

In the Lotus Spa, cruisers will find a welcoming feel and contemporary, sophisticated décor, New features include private Couples Villas and The... Read more

Princess Links

Princess Links, located on deck 19 is the ship's 9 hole mini golf course.

Kids and teens

Passengers ages 3 to 17 will enjoy many exciting on-board activities. The Youth Centres and Teen Lounges are staffed by experienced counsellors, who are ready to ensure the youngest cruisers stay happy all day long. There’s everything from art projects, game tables, the latest movies, pizza parties, talent shows, video games, and much more.

Children under the age of 3 are welcome to visit the Youth Centre, if accompanied and supervised by a parent at all times.

Princess Pelicans

Ages 3-7- There’s an exciting toddler area, a mini air hockey table, great arts and crafts stations, plus a space for group activities... Read more

Shockwaves

Ages 8-12- Offering games and activities like air hockey, skeeball, and video game stations – not to mention a dedicated lounge with a... Read more

Remix

Ages 13-17- Featuring a new lounge area, perfect for meeting new friends, with skeeball, foosball, and great video games. In the teen-only exclusive... Read more

Enrichment

When is a cruise an opportunity to enrich? When it's a Princess cruise. This ship offers area lectures, art exhibits and classes taught by local experts.

Edutainment

Princess Cruises believe learning is fun. Through their exclusive partnership with the California Science Centre, their Youth Staff are trained to deliver... Read more

[email protected]

Expand your mind with an array of engaging [email protected] opportunities. There are up to 40 classes on every cruise. Tantalise your taste... Read more

Art Collections, Galleries and Auctions

Princess Fine Arts auctions* are fun, fast-paced, and offer an exciting opportunity to collect exceptional works of art. You’ll find some of... Read more

Useful info

Disabled Facilities

Wheelchair users will find access-friendly design across most of the Princess fleet, making it easy to enjoy each vessel's restaurants, theaters, spas,... Read more

Special Dietary Requirements

Princess Cruises are happy to meet your request for low-sodium, low-fat, low-sugar and vegetarian diets. Kosher meals and baby food are available... Read more

Age Restrictions

The legal drinking age of 21 years is always observed on-board all ships and proof of age may be required. All on-board... Read more

Dress Code

You should dress for a cruise with Princess the same way you would for any stylish land-based resort.
Casual sportswear, including shorts, lightweight... Read more

Drinks Packages

All Inclusive Beverage Package:
Relax and enjoy the convenience of an all inclusive beverage package featuring any drink up to $10 including cocktails,... Read more

E-Cigarette & Smoking Policies

Keeping the comfort of our guests a priority, and in consideration of consumer studies which show smokers are a small minority of... Read more

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Prices shown are per person based on two people sharing (unless otherwise specfied) in GBP and subject to availability. Certain restrictions can apply. Prices are updated on a daily basis and may vary when continuing through the booking process.