Princess Cruises

32-night Brazilian & Cape Horn Grand Adventure

Discovery Princess

Discovery Princess℠, the third vessel designed from the ground up with Princess MedallionClassTM and the final Royal-class ship, will continue to deliver an array of innovative new experiences. Enjoy 270-degree sweeping views from the largest balconies at sea, unwind in ultimate comfort at The Sanctuary, and indulge your senses with world-class dining options from Michelin-star chefs. Plus, Princess Live Entertainment presents spectacular new productions that can only be seen in our state-of-the-art Princess Theater.

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Itinerary highlights
Fort Lauderdale, Florida United States of America
Basseterre Saint Kitts and Nevis
Fort de France Martinique
Ship highlights
Photo of the Anytime Dining Anytime Dining
Photo of the Art Gallery & Auction Art Gallery & Auction
Photo of the Movie Under the Stars Movie Under the Stars
from
£4,399
per person
from
£137
per night
Free cancellation up to 30 days before you sail through 30 April 2021
6 Jan 2022
£4,999 £4,399
6 Jan 2022
£5,499 £4,999
6 Jan 2022
£4,999 £4,500
6 Jan 2022
£6,899 £6,699
Book from £4,399 Email me this cruise

Cruise with Confidence

Cancel your cruise for free up to 30 days before your sail date and get a future cruise credit in the amount of non-refundable fees (the remainder will be refunded to you). Applies to sailings departing through 30 April 2021.

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The itinerary

With over 480km of waterways, Fort Lauderdale is the 'Venice of America' and the yachting capital of the world. The city's cruise port, Port Everglades is the third busiest in the world, catering to almost four million passengers every year. Before you head to your ship, check out the 2-mile Las Olas Boulevard, filled with chic cafés, independent boutiques and entertainment venues. A stroll along the tree-lined promenade and beautiful sand beaches, will give you the perfect taster of what's in store on your sun-soaked cruise itinerary.

Day 2At Sea

Day 3At Sea

Mountainous St. Kitts, the first English settlement in the Leeward Islands, crams some stunning scenery into its 65 square miles (168 square km). The fertile, lush island has some fascinating natural and historical attractions: a rain forest replete with waterfalls, thick vines, and secret trails; a central mountain range dominated by the 3,792-foot Mt. Liamuiga, whose crater has long been dormant; and Brimstone Hill, known in the 18th century as the Gibraltar of the West Indies. Cruises to Basseterre will dock in Port Zante in the heart of the city. English with a strong West Indian lilt is spoken here. People are friendly but shy; always ask before you take photographs. Also, be sure to wear wraps or shorts over beach attire when you're in public places.

The largest of the Windward Islands, Martinique is 4,261 mi (6,817 km) from Paris, but its spirit and language are decidedly French, with more than a soupçon of West Indian spice. Tangible, edible evidence of the fact is the island's cuisine, a superb blend of French and creole. Martinique is lushly landscaped with tropical flowers. Trees bend under the weight of fruits such as mangoes, papayas, lemons, limes, and bright-red West Indian cherries. Acres of banana plantations, pineapple fields, and waving sugarcane stretch to the horizon. The towering mountains and verdant rain forest in the north lure hikers, while underwater sights and sunken treasures attract snorkelers and scuba divers. Martinique is also wonderful if your idea of exercise is turning over every 10 minutes to get an even tan and your taste in adventure runs to duty-free shopping. A popular cruise-ship excursion goes to St-Pierre, which was buried by ash when Mont Pelée erupted in 1902.

Day 6At Sea

Day 7At Sea

Day 8At Sea

Day 9At Sea

Called the "City of Light," Fortaleza claims that the sun shines on it 2,800 hours a year. And it's a good thing, too, as the coastline stretches far beyond the city. To the east, along the Litoral Leste or the Costa Sol Nascente (Sunrise Coast) are many fishing villages. To the west, along the Litoral Oeste or the Costa Sol Poente (Sunset Coast), there are pristine stretches of sand. The shores here are cooled by constant breezes and lapped by waters with an average temperature of 24°C (72°F).Today Fortaleza, a large, modern state capital with more than 2 million inhabitants, is Brazil's fifth-largest city. It's also on the move, with one of the country's newest airports, a modern convention center, a huge cultural center with a planetarium, large shopping malls, several museums and theaters, and an abundance of sophisticated restaurants. At Praia de Iracema there's a revitalized beachfront area of sidewalk cafés, bars, and dance clubs. But if you wander along the shore, you're still bound to encounter fishermen unloading their catch from traditional jangadas—just as they've done for hundreds of years.

Day 11At Sea

Day 12At Sea

Day 13At Sea

Welcome to the Cidade Maravilhosa, or the Marvelous City, as Rio is known in Brazil. Synonymous with the girl from Ipanema, the dramatic views from Christ the Redeemer atop Corcovado mountain, and fabulously flamboyant Carnival celebrations, Rio is a city of stunning architecture, abundant museums, and marvelous food. Rio is also home to 23 beaches, an almost continuous 73-km (45-mile) ribbon of sand.As you leave the airport and head to Rio's beautiful Zona Sul (the touristic South Zone), you'll drive for about 40 minutes on a highway from where you'll begin to get a sense of the dramatic contrast between beautiful landscape and devastating poverty. In this teeming metropolis of 12 million people (6.2 million of whom live in Rio proper), the very rich and the very poor live in uneasy proximity. You'll drive past seemingly endless cinder-block favela, but by the time you reach Copacabana's breezy, sunny Avenida Atlântica—flanked on one side by white beach and azure sea and on the other by condominiums and hotels—your heart will leap with expectation as you begin to recognize the postcard-famous sights. Now you're truly in Rio, where cariocas (Rio residents) and tourists live life to its fullest.Enthusiasm is contagious in Rio. Prepare to have your senses engaged and your inhibitions untied. Rio seduces with a host of images: the joyous bustle of vendors at Sunday's Feira Hippie (Hippie Fair); the tipsy babble at sidewalk cafés as patrons sip their last glass of icy beer under the stars; the blanket of lights beneath the Pão de Açúcar (Sugarloaf Mountain); the bikers, joggers, strollers, and power walkers who parade along the beach each morning. Borrow the carioca spirit for your stay; you may find yourself reluctant to give it back.

Welcome to the Cidade Maravilhosa, or the Marvelous City, as Rio is known in Brazil. Synonymous with the girl from Ipanema, the dramatic views from Christ the Redeemer atop Corcovado mountain, and fabulously flamboyant Carnival celebrations, Rio is a city of stunning architecture, abundant museums, and marvelous food. Rio is also home to 23 beaches, an almost continuous 73-km (45-mile) ribbon of sand.As you leave the airport and head to Rio's beautiful Zona Sul (the touristic South Zone), you'll drive for about 40 minutes on a highway from where you'll begin to get a sense of the dramatic contrast between beautiful landscape and devastating poverty. In this teeming metropolis of 12 million people (6.2 million of whom live in Rio proper), the very rich and the very poor live in uneasy proximity. You'll drive past seemingly endless cinder-block favela, but by the time you reach Copacabana's breezy, sunny Avenida Atlântica—flanked on one side by white beach and azure sea and on the other by condominiums and hotels—your heart will leap with expectation as you begin to recognize the postcard-famous sights. Now you're truly in Rio, where cariocas (Rio residents) and tourists live life to its fullest.Enthusiasm is contagious in Rio. Prepare to have your senses engaged and your inhibitions untied. Rio seduces with a host of images: the joyous bustle of vendors at Sunday's Feira Hippie (Hippie Fair); the tipsy babble at sidewalk cafés as patrons sip their last glass of icy beer under the stars; the blanket of lights beneath the Pão de Açúcar (Sugarloaf Mountain); the bikers, joggers, strollers, and power walkers who parade along the beach each morning. Borrow the carioca spirit for your stay; you may find yourself reluctant to give it back.

Day 16At Sea

Day 17At Sea

Uruguay’s capital city hugs the eastern bank of the Río de la Plata. A massive coastal promenade (malecón) that passes fine beaches, restaurants, and numerous parks recalls the sunny sophistications of the Mediterranean and is always dotted with Montevideans strolling, exercising, and lounging along the water. Montevideo has its share of glitzy shopping avenues and modern office buildings, balanced with its historic old city and sumptuous colonial architecture, as well as numerous leafy plazas and parks. It is hard not to draw comparisons to its sister city Buenos Aires across the river, and indeed Montevideo strikes many as a calmer, more manageable incarnation of Argentina's capital.When the weather's good, La Rambla, a 22-km (14-mile) waterfront avenue that links the Old City with the eastern suburbs and changes names about a dozen times, gets packed with fishermen, ice-cream vendors, and joggers. Around sunset, volleyball and soccer games wind down as couples begin to appear for evening strolls. Polls consistently rate Montevideo as having the highest quality of life of any city in Latin America. After one visit here, especially on a lovely summer evening, you probably will agree.

Glamorous and gritty, Buenos Aires is two cities in one. What makes Argentina's capital so fascinating is its dual heritage—part European, part Latin American. Plaza de Mayo resembles a grand square in Madrid, and the ornate Teatro Colón would not be out of place in Vienna. But you’ll know you’re in South America by the leather shoes for sale on cobbled streets and impromptu parades of triumphant soccer fans. Limited-production wines, juicy steaks, and ice cream in countless flavors are among the old-world imports the city has perfected.

Glamorous and gritty, Buenos Aires is two cities in one. What makes Argentina's capital so fascinating is its dual heritage—part European, part Latin American. Plaza de Mayo resembles a grand square in Madrid, and the ornate Teatro Colón would not be out of place in Vienna. But you’ll know you’re in South America by the leather shoes for sale on cobbled streets and impromptu parades of triumphant soccer fans. Limited-production wines, juicy steaks, and ice cream in countless flavors are among the old-world imports the city has perfected.

Day 21At Sea

Approaching from Ruta 3, it's hard to believe that the horizon line of buildings perched just beyond the windswept dunes and badlands is the most successful of all coastal Patagonia settlements. But once you get past the outskirts of town and onto the wide coastal road known as the Rambla, the picture begins to change. Ranged along the clear and tranquil Golfo Nuevo are restaurants, cafés, dive shops, and hotels, all busy—but not yet overcrowded—with tourists from around the world.Puerto Madryn is more a base for visiting nearby wildlife-watching sites like Península Valdés and Punta Tombo than a destination in its own right. The town's architecture is unremarkable, and beyond a walk along the coast there isn't much to do. Indeed, even the few museums serve mainly to introduce you to the fauna you'll see elsewhere. The exception is the beginning of whale season (May through July), when the huge animals cavort right in the bay before heading north—you can even walk out alongside them on the pier. During these months it's worth the extra expense for a room with a sea view.The many tour agencies and rental-car companies here make excursion planning easy. Aim to spend most of your time here on one- or two-day trips exploring the surroundings. Note that competition is fierce between tourism operators in destinations such as Puerto Madryn and Puerto Pirámides on Península Valdés. Take information that tour operators and even the tourism office give you about these with a grain of salt: they often exaggerate Madryn's virtues and other areas' flaws.

Day 23At Sea

Tiny Stanley, capital of the Falklands, seems in many ways like a British village fallen out of the sky. Many homes are painted in bright colours, adding visual appeal to this distant outpost. Not far offshore, the wreck of the Lady Elizabeth, is one of the many vessels remaining as a silent testimonial to the region's frequent harsh weather conditions.The islands, also known by their Spanish name of Islas Malvinas, are home to arguably more tuxedo-clad inhabitants of the penguin variety than human residents. Various species, such as Gentoo, Magellanic and the more elusive King penguins, either live here permanently or use the Falklands as a stopover on their migration route. Darwin found the islands' flora and fauna fascinating - no doubt you will, too.

Day 25Cape Horn Chile

At 55 degrees latitude south, Ushuaia (pronounced oo-swy-ah) is closer to the South Pole than to Argentina's northern border with Bolivia. It is the capital and tourism base for Tierra del Fuego, the island at the southernmost tip of Argentina.Although its stark physical beauty is striking, Tierra del Fuego's historical allure is based more on its mythical past than on rugged reality. The island was inhabited for 6,000 years by Yámana, Haush, Selk'nam, and Alakaluf Indians. But in 1902 Argentina, eager to populate Patagonia to bolster its territorial claims, moved to initiate an Ushuaian penal colony, establishing the permanent settlement of its most southern territories and, by implication, everything in between.When the prison closed in 1947, Ushuaia had a population of about 3,000, made up mainly of former inmates and prison staff. Today the Indians of Darwin's "missing link" theory are long gone—wiped out by diseases brought by settlers and by indifference to their plight—and the 60,000 residents of Ushuaia are hitching their star to tourism.The city rightly (if perhaps too loudly) promotes itself as the southernmost city in the world (Puerto Williams, a few miles south on the Chilean side of the Beagle Channel, is a small town). You can make your way to the tourism office to get your clichéd, but oh-so-necessary, "Southernmost City in the World" passport stamp. Ushuaia feels like a frontier boomtown, at heart still a rugged, weather-beaten fishing village, but exhibiting the frayed edges of a city that quadrupled in size in the '70s and '80s and just keeps growing. Unpaved portions of Ruta 3, the last stretch of the Pan-American Highway, which connects Alaska to Tierra del Fuego, are finally being paved. The summer months (December through March) draw more than 120,000 visitors, and dozens of cruise ships. The city is trying to extend those visits with events like March's Marathon at the End of the World and by increasing the gamut of winter activities buoyed by the excellent snow conditions.A terrific trail winds through the town up to the Martial Glacier, where a ski lift can help cut down a steep kilometer of your journey. The chaotic and contradictory urban landscape includes a handful of luxury hotels amid the concrete of public housing projects. Scores of "sled houses" (wooden shacks) sit precariously on upright piers, ready for speedy displacement to a different site. But there are also many small, picturesque homes with tiny, carefully tended gardens. Many of the newer homes are built in a Swiss-chalet style, reinforcing the idea that this is a town into which tourism has breathed new life. At the same time, the weather-worn pastel colors that dominate the town's landscape remind you that Ushuaia was once just a tiny fishing village, snuggled at the end of the Earth.As you stand on the banks of the Canal Beagle (Beagle Channel) near Ushuaia, the spirit of the farthest corner of the world takes hold. What stands out is the light: at sundown the landscape is cast in a subdued, sensual tone; everything feels closer, softer, and more human in dimension despite the vastness of the setting. The snowcapped mountains reflect the setting sun back onto a stream rolling into the channel, as nearby peaks echo their image—on a windless day—in the still waters.Above the city rise the last mountains of the Andean Cordillera, and just south and west of Ushuaia they finally vanish into the often-stormy sea. Snow whitens the peaks well into summer. Nature is the principal attraction here, with trekking, fishing, horseback riding, wildlife spotting, and sailing among the most rewarding activities, especially in the Parque Nacional Tierra del Fuego (Tierra del Fuego National Park).

Impenetrable forests, impassable mountains, and endless fields of ice define Chilean Patagonia, and meant that the region went largely unexplored until the beginning of the 20th century. Located in the southernmost part of the country, this area is still sparsely inhabited, though you will find a few populated places—like the colorful provincial city of Punta Arenas, which looks like it's about to be swept into the Strait of Magellan. Some unique wildlife, particularly colonies of elephant seals and penguins, call this breathtaking topography home. To the north is Parque Nacional Torres del Paine, the country's most magnificent natural wonder, and whose snow-covered peaks seem to rise vertically from the plains below. The vistas, such as the fantastic Avenue of the Glaciers, are breathtaking; along this stretch of the Beagle Channel, you can pass six tremendous glaciers all within a stone's throw of each other.Cruise SightsPunta Arenas. Founded a little more than 150 years ago, Punta Arenas (Sandy Point) was Chile's first permanent settlement in Patagonia. Plaza Muñoz Gamero, the central square, is surrounded by evidence of that early prosperity: buildings whose then-opulent brick exteriors recall a time when this was one of Chile's wealthiest cities. The newer houses here have colorful tin roofs, best appreciated when seen from a high vantage point such as the Mirador Cerro la Cruz. Although the city as a whole may not be particularly attractive, look for details: the pink-and-white house on a corner, the bay window full of potted plants, parking attendants wearing the regional blue and yellow colors, and schoolchildren in identical naval pea coats that remind you that the city's fate is tied to the sea.The Museo Naval y Marítimo extols Chile's high-seas prowess, particularly concerning Antarctica. Its exhibits are worth a visit for anyone with an interest in ships and sailing, merchant and military alike. Part of the second floor is designed like the interior of a ship, including a map and radio room. Pedro Montt 989. Admission charged.Housed in what was once the mansion of the powerful Braun-Menéndez family, the Museo Regional de Magallanes is an intriguing glimpse into the daily life of a wealthy provincial family at the beginning of the 20th century. Lavish Carrara marble hearths, English bath fixtures, and cordovan leather walls are among the original accoutrements. The museum also has an excellent group of displays depicting Punta Arenas's past, from the first European contact to the town's decline after the opening of the Panama Canal. The museum is half a block north of the main square. Magallanes 949. Admission charged.The resplendent 1895 Palacio Sara Braun is a national landmark and an architectural showpiece of southern Patagonia. Designed by a French architect, the house was built from materials and by craftsmen imported from Europe during the four years of construction. The city's central plaza and surrounding buildings soon followed, ushering in the region's golden era. Noteworthy are the lavish bedrooms, magnificent parquet floors, marble fireplaces, and hand-painted ceilings. Don't miss the portraits of Braun and her husband José Nogueira in the music room. Afterwards, head to the cellar for a drink or snack in the warm public tavern (a good portion of the mansion is leased to a hotel). Plaza Muñoz Gamero 716. Admission charged.Commonly referred to simply as "El Salesiano," the Museo Salesiano de Maggiorino Borgatello is operated by Italian missionaries whose order arrived in Punta Arenas in the 19th century. The Salesians, most of whom spoke no Spanish, proved to be daring explorers. Traveling throughout the region, they collected the artifacts made by indigenous tribes that are currently on display. Av. Bulnes 398. Admission charged.Isla Magdalena. Punta Arenas is the launching point for a boat trip to the Isla Magdalena to see the more than 100,000 Magellanic penguins at the Monumento Natural Los Pingúinos. A single trail, marked off by rope, is accessible to humans. The boat trip to the island, in the middle of the Estrecho de Magallanes, takes about two hours. Make sure to bring along warm clothing, even in summer; the island can be chilly, particularly if a breeze is blowing across the water.Parque Nacional Torres del Paine. Some 12 million years ago, lava flows pushed up through the thick sedimentary crust that covered the southwestern coast of South America, cooling to form a granite mass. Glaciers then swept through the region, grinding away all but the ash-gray spires that rise over the landscape of one of the world's most beautiful natural phenomena, now the Parque Nacional Torres del Paine (established in 1959). Snow formations dazzle along every turn of road, and the sunset views are spectacular.Among the 2,420-square-km (934-square-mi) park's most beautiful attractions are its lakes of turquoise, aquamarine, and emerald green waters. Another draw is its unusual wildlife. Creatures like the guanaco (a woollier version of the llama) and the ñandú (resembling a small ostrich) abound. They are used to visitors and don't seem to be bothered by the proximity of automobile traffic and the snapping of cameras. Predators, like the gray fox, make less frequent appearances. You may also spot the dramatic aerobatics of a falcon and the graceful soaring of the endangered condor. The beautiful puma is especially elusive, but sightings have become more common. Admission charged.Pingúinera de Seno Otway. The road to this penguin sanctuary begins 30 km (18 mi) north of Punta Arenas. Magellanic penguins, which live up to 20 years in the wild, return to their birthplace here every year to mate with the same partner. For about 2,000 penguin couples—no single penguins make the trip—home is this desolate and windswept land off the Otway Sound. In late September, the penguins begin to arrive from the southern coast of Brazil and the Falkland Islands. They mate and lay their eggs in early October, and brood their eggs in November. Offspring hatch between mid-November and early December. If you're lucky, you may catch sight of one of the downy gray chicks that stick their heads out of the burrows when their parents return to feed them. Otherwise you might see scores of the ungainly adult penguins waddling to the ocean from their nesting burrows. They swim for food every eight hours and dive up to 100 feet deep. The penguins depart from the sound in late March. Note that the sanctuary is a 1-km (1/2-mi) walk from the parking lot. It gets chilly, so bring a windbreaker. Admission charged.Reserva Nacional Laguna Parillar. This 47,000-acre reserve lies west of Puerto Hambre, a tranquil fishing village, and is centered around a shimmering lake in a valley flanked by hills. It's a great place for a picnic, and there are a number of well-marked paths that offer sweeping vistas over the Estrecho de Magallanes. About 2 km (1 mi) west of Puerto Hambre is a small white monolith that marks the geographical center of Chile, the midway point between Chile's northern port Arica and the South Pole.Cruise ShoppingWool may no longer be king of the economy, but vast flocks of sheep still yield a high-quality product that is woven into the clothing here. Leather products are also common, but the prices are not necessarily low. About 3 km (2 mi) north of Punta Arenas is the Zona Franca (Av. Bulnes). This duty-free zone is where people from all around the region come for low-priced electronics and other consumer items.

For most of its history, windy Puerto Montt was the end of the line for just about everyone traveling in the Lake District. Now the Carretera Austral carries on southward, but for all intents and purposes Puerto Montt remains the region's last significant outpost, a provincial city that is the hub of local fishing, textile, and tourist activity.Today the city center is full of malls, condos, and office towers—it's the fastest-growing city in Chile—but away from downtown, Puerto Montt consists mainly of low clapboard houses perched above its bay, the Seno de Reloncaví. If it's a sunny day, head east to Playa Pelluco or one of the city's other beaches. If you're more interested in exploring the countryside, drive along the shore for a good view of the surrounding hills.

Day 31At Sea

Day 32At Sea

The ship Discovery Princess

Discovery Princess℠, the third vessel designed from the ground up with Princess MedallionClassTM and the final Royal-class ship, will continue to deliver an array of innovative new experiences. Enjoy 270-degree sweeping views from the largest balconies at sea, unwind in ultimate comfort at The Sanctuary, and indulge your senses with world-class dining options from Michelin-star chefs. Plus, Princess Live Entertainment presents spectacular new productions that can only be seen in our state-of-the-art Princess Theater.

Capacity
3660
Cabins
1834
Total crew
1346
Length
1083m

Food and drink

Indulge your appetite whenever you wish on board Princess®. Every hour, our chefs are busy baking, grilling and sautéing great-tasting fare from scratch. Princess offers unparalleled inclusive dining options throughout the ship with a wide range of culinary delights to suit any palate, from endless buffet choice to gourmet pizza, frosty treats, decadent desserts and much more.

Anytime Dining

Just like a restaurant at home, Anytime Dining enables guests the freedom to dine when and with whom they wish, at any... Read more
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Traditonal Dining

Indulge in the Classic Cruise Experience

Harkening back to the Golden Era of sea travel, our Traditional Dining option allows you to... Read more

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Crafted by Curtis Stone

In the Main Dining Room, savor fresh new cuisine designed by award-winning Chef Curtis Stone during every voyage. Personal reflections on the... Read more
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Chocolate Journeys

Indulge Your Chocolate Fantasies

There are few foods that inspire as much passion as chocolate, and master chocolatier Norman Love has designed... Read more

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Alfredo's Pizzeria

Hand-Tossed Pizza, Hot Out of the Oven

Named for our Master Chef, Alfredo Marzi and voted "Best Pizza at Sea" by USA... Read more

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Italian

World Fresh Marketplace

Taste the World One Station at a Time

The World Fresh Marketplace boasts food stations from around the world that offer endless... Read more

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International Cafe

Sip and Snack Around the Clock

Open 24-hours a day, the International Café located in the Piazza is the place for an... Read more

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Cafe

The Salty Dog Grill

Treat yourself to one of our 100% handmade Gourmet Burgers, including our Princess Burger or Triple Smoked Burger. The Salty Dog Grill... Read more
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American

Ocean Terrace

Celebrate Seafood

The Ocean Terrace seafood bar is ideal for those who love to feast on the bounty from the sea. This... Read more

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Japanese

Slice Pizzeria

Our top-deck pizzeria features a bold new look that sets the stage for tempting offerings that include specialties inspired by local favorites... Read more
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Italian

Afternoon Tea

Celebration of Tasty Teas and Divine Desserts

Afternoon tea is a treasured tradition whether it’s a special occasion, an intimate moment for... Read more

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British

Gelato

Frosty & Savory Italian-style Treats

It’s a gelateria and a creperie all in one. Indulge in delicious, Italian-style ice cream creations, including homemade... Read more

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Gelato

Chef's Table Lumiere

A Dazzling Dining Adventure

An extraordinary treat for both gastronomes and gourmet novices, the Chef’s Table Lumiere is a perfect culinary journey... Read more

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Sabatini's Italian Trattoria

From across the fleet, treasured family recipes curated from our Italian chefs inspire the menu at this transformation of our acclaimed specialty... Read more
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Italian

The Salty Dog Gastropub

A warm, inviting gastropub experience developed with Ernesto Uchimura, a founding chef of the original Umami Burger. Try one of our innovative... Read more
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Gastro

Crown Grill

Timeless Steakhouse Traditions

With a rich wood décor and a theater-style kitchen, it’s no wonder Crown Grill was named among the “Best... Read more

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Ultimate Balcony Dining

A Private Dining Room with a View

Choose a luxurious breakfast or experience the “ultimate” romantic dinner at sea: a sumptuous multi-course... Read more

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Entertainment

On every Princess ship, you'll find so many ways to play, day or night. Explore The Shops of Princess, celebrate cultures at our Festivals of the World or learn a new talent — our onboard activities will keep you engaged every moment of your cruise vacation.

Music & Dancing

Dazzling Entertainment Every Day and Night

When it comes to music and dancing we’ve got everything that your musical palette may desire.... Read more

Vegas Style Casino

For Novices, Casual Players, or High Rollers

From gaming lessons to the latest slot machines to prize tournaments, our Casinos offer fun... Read more

Discover at Sea Programs

Discover Even More with Discovery™

Our exclusive partnership with Discovery™ lets you come back captivated with Stargazing on our top deck and... Read more

Platinum Photography Studio

Capture a Memorable Moment in Time

Our Platinum Studio specializes in premium black and white portraits. Skilled photographers using expert lighting techniques... Read more

Top Deck Parties

The Height of Festivities at Sea

For breathtaking ocean views and engaging opportunities to meet new friends and celebrate your voyage, no place... Read more

Movie Under the Stars

A Reel Treat Day or Night

Throughout the day and night, our exclusive open-air poolside amphitheater is the go-to destination for feature... Read more

A Voice of the Ocean

The No. 1 TV Singing Competition Rocks the High Seas!

Have you got The Voice of the Ocean? Princess Cruises brings the... Read more

Original Musical Productions

Great Venues Large and Small

Crafted by some of the world’s top directors and choreographers, our remarkable and dynamic Princess productions transport... Read more

Festivals of the World

Experience the World’s Great Celebrations

There’s nothing like a Princess party to bring people together. Our Festivals of the World hosts onboard... Read more

Featured Guest Entertainers

At Night, the Stars Shine Bright on Our Stages

Grab a seat, order a cocktail and be prepared to be entertained by... Read more

The Shops of Princess

Tax and Duty-free Shopping

It’s no surprise The Shops are awarded “Best Onboard Shopping” from Porthole magazine year after year. On board,... Read more

Take Five

The Only Jazz Theater at Sea

Relive the roots of jazz each evening with a live trio performing brilliant classics and telling tales... Read more

Princess Live!

Live Acts and Spirited Gatherings

Join family or friends at an intimate table in the spacious Princess Live! and Café, and enjoy your... Read more

Princess Theater

Broadway-Style Productions at Sea

With dazzling stage sets, artists from around the globe, modern hits and timeless classics, the Princess Theater, our... Read more

Crooners

Marvelous Martinis and Melodies

Step into Crooners bar and be transported to the classic Sinatra era, made complete with a top notch... Read more

The Piazza

Take a Stroll into the European-style Piazza

Discover Old World charm as you stroll through our breathtaking Piazza—a hub of activity, inspired... Read more

Vista Show Lounge

Top Notch Entertainment & Crafted Cocktails

The newly re-designed Vista Lounge at the aft of the ship features an endless variety of... Read more

MedallionNet Wi-Fi

Fast – Reliable - Unlimited

MedallionNet delivers Wi-Fi wherever you are, letting you stream your favorite shows, movies, music, sports. Stay connected... Read more

Health and fitness

Revitalize and refresh body, mind and soul with Princess®. From rejuvenating spa treatments and the tranquility of a top-deck retreat reserved just for adults to our state-of-the-art fitness centers, you’ll find all the elements to come back new.

Sports Court

Get in the Game with a Variety of Activities

Feel the court under your feet and the thrill of victory as you... Read more

Lotus Spa

Go Ahead, Be Pampered – You Deserve It

Named "Best Spa on a Cruise Ship" by Spafinder Wellness 365™, the Lotus Spa®... Read more

Lotus Spa Fitness Center

A Host of Ways to Get an Energizing Workout

The Lotus Spa Fitness Center offers fitness programs designed to help you maximize... Read more

The Enclave at Lotus Spa

Luxuriate in Our Largest-ever Thermal Suite

Open the door to The Enclave, home to Princess’ largest-ever thermal suite and a dramatic hydro-therapy... Read more

Pools (Retreats, Wakeview, Top Deck)

So Many Cool Places to Unwind

Take a cool dip and lounge by a shimmering pool. Or soak away the day’s adventures in... Read more

Kids and teens

From family-friendly stateroom options to enriching youth and family programs, quality time is time well spent. Onboard activities spark curiosity and fuel creativity while excursions ashore engage and inspire!

Just for Kids 3-7

Explore the Treehouse

Even the littlest guests will delight in this whimsical, forest-themed world that inspires playtime and invites exploration. Kids, ages... Read more

Just for Kids 8-12

Step into the Lodge

Inspired by the great outdoors, this cozy center keeps kids busy with games, dancing and kid-sized Olympic competitions.... Read more

Just for Teens 13-17

Hang Out in the Beach House

This contemporary lounge is "the place” for teens — perfect for hanging out and socializing with... Read more

Family

Quality Time Together

Princess makes it easy to sail together in comfort. There is a wide selection of staterooms accommodating up to... Read more

Enrichment

Art Gallery & Auction

Art Lovers Rejoice—Enjoy Exquisite Art Aboard

Great art, like the destinations we visit, can be awe-inspiring. Peruse our extensive art gallery, or... Read more

Useful info

Clothing Recommendations

You should dress for a cruise with Princess the same way you would for any stylish land-based resort.

Casual sportswear, including shorts, lightweight... Read more

Smoking Policy

Keeping the comfort of our guests a priority, and in consideration of consumer studies which show smokers are a small minority of... Read more

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Flights available from Any London and Manchester airports
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We know these are uncertain times, but don't fret. All bookings are covered by our Financial Protection Guarantee and we only work with cruise lines that are members of ATOL and ABTA. For more information about cancellation cover, visit the Coronavirus Cancellation Policies page.

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* Passengers should be aged under 18 at the time of embarkation to qualify as a child.
Prices shown are per person based on two people sharing (unless otherwise specfied) in GBP and subject to availability. Certain restrictions can apply. Prices are updated on a daily basis and may vary when continuing through the booking process.