Holland America Line

20-night Best Of The Mediterranean

Nieuw Statendam

Launched December 2018, Nieuw Statendam carries forward the nautical heritage, signature service and classic style for which Holland America Line is known—while raising the bar for 21st-century elegance. Sister ship to Koningsdam, she’s the second of our Pinnacle-class ships.

Explore the ship
Itinerary highlights
Civitavecchia Italy
Kotor Montenegro
Kerkira, Corfu Greece
Ship highlights
Photo of the Pinnacle Grill Pinnacle Grill
Photo of the Explorations Central Explorations Central
Photo of the BLEND BLEND
from
£2,859
per person
from
£143
per night
Free cancellation up to 30 days before you sail through 31 Dec 2021
29 Sep 2021
£3,139 £2,859
29 Sep 2021
£3,589 £3,449
29 Sep 2021
£3,879 £3,449
29 Sep 2021
£5,059 £4,769
Book from £2,859 Email me this cruise

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Cancel your cruise for free up to 30 days before your sail date and get a future cruise credit in the amount of non-refundable fees (the remainder will be refunded to you), valid until 31 December 2021.

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The itinerary

Civitavecchia is the cruise gateway to Rome. Italy's vibrant capital lives in the present, but no other city on earth evokes its past so powerfully. For over 2,500 years, emperors, popes, artists, and common citizens have left their mark here. Archaeological remains from ancient Rome, art-stuffed churches, and the treasures of Vatican City vie for your attention, but Rome is also a wonderful place to practice the Italian-perfected il dolce far niente, the sweet art of idleness. Your most memorable experiences may include sitting at a caffè in the Campo de' Fiori or strolling in a beguiling piazza.

Day 2At Sea

Backed by imposing mountains, tiny Kotor lies hidden from the open sea, tucked into the deepest channel of the Bokor Kotorska (Kotor Bay), which is Europe's most southerly fjord. Kotor's medieval Stari Grad (Old Town) is enclosed within well-preserved defensive walls built between the 9th and 18th centuries and is presided over by a proud hilltop fortress. Within the walls, a labyrinth of winding cobbled streets leads through a series of splendid paved piazzas, rimmed by centuries-old stone buildings. The squares are now haunted by strains from buskers but although many now house trendy cafés and chic boutiques, directions are still given medieval-style by reference to the town’s landmark churches. Kotor has a cruise terminal in the heart of the city that can accommodate medium-sized ships. Most larger ships anchor at sea and tender their passengers over to the harbour.

Katakolon could not seem less of a cruise port if it tried. A tiny enclave clinging to the western Peloponnese coast, it's a sleepy place except when ships dock. But it's a popular cruise destination because of its proximity to Olympia. Ancient Olympia was one of the most important cities in classical Greece. The Sanctuary of Zeus was the city's raison d'être, and attracted pilgrims from around the eastern Mediterranean, and later the city played host to Olympic Games, the original athletic games that were the inspiration for today's modern sporting pan-planetary meet. At the foot of the tree-covered Kronion hill, in a valley near two rivers, Katakolon is today one of the most popular ancient sites in Greece. If you don't want to make the trip to Olympia, then Katakolon is an ideal place for a leisurely Greek lunch while you watch the fishermen mend their nets, but there's just not much else to do there.

Athens is the birthplace of the modern western world, home to magnificent wonders including the Parthenon, the Acropolis, the Temples of Olympian Zeus and Athena Nike, and the most impressive collection of ancient artefacts at the Archaeological Museum. Athens effortlessly blends its ancient historic landmarks with a youthful, modern energy with chic rooftop bars, eclectic shopping destinations and a bustling art scene. Piraeus is the gateway to Athens for cruise visitors, which is easily accessible by public transport.

Whilst the busy resort town of Kusadasi offers much in the way of shopping and dining – not to mention a flourishing beach life scene, the real jewel here is Ephesus and the stunning ruined city that really take centre stage. With only 20% of the classical ruins having been excavated, this archaeological wonder has already gained the status as Europe’s most complete classical metropolis. And a metropolis it really is; built in the 10th century BC this UNESCO World Heritage site is nothing short of spectacular. Although regrettably very little remains of the Temple of Artemis (one of the seven wonders of the ancient world), the superb Library of Celsus’ façade is practically intact and it is one of life’s great joys to attend an evening performance in the illuminated ruins once all the tourists have left. The history of the city is fascinating and multi-layered and it is well worth reading up on this beforehand if a visit is planned. Another point of interest for historians would be the house of the Virgin Mary, located on the romantically named Mount Nightingale and just nine kilometres away from Ephesus proper. Legend has it that Mary (along with St. John) spent her final years here, secluded from the rest of the population, spreading Christianity. An edifying experience, even for non-believers. For the less historical minded amongst you, Kusadasi offers plenty in the way of activities. After a stroll through the town, jump in a taxi to Ladies’ Beach (men are allowed), sample a Turkish kebap on one of the many beachfront restaurants and enjoy the clement weather. If you do want to venture further afield, then the crystal clear beaches of Guzelcamli (or the Millipark), the cave of Zeus and the white scalloped natural pools at Pamukkale, known as Cleopatra’s pools, are definitely worth a visit.

Undoubtedly the most extraordinary island in the Aegean, crescent-shape Santorini remains a mandatory stop on the Cycladic tourist route—even if it's necessary to enjoy the sensational sunsets from Ia, the fascinating excavations, and the dazzling white towns with a million other travellers. Fira, the capital of the island, is a busy city packed with shops, museums, bars, tavernas, resorts, and nightclubs. Cruise ships anchor at sea and tender their passengers to the base of the Caldera Cliffs in Fira – warning: it's a steep walk up, many opt for the cable car instead!

The iconic blue domes of Santorini Island, Greece

Day 9At Sea

Naples is Italy's third largest city. Its claim to fame is the spectacular location along one of the world's most splendid bays, backed by the perfect cone of Mount Vesuvius. In addition to its beautiful setting, Naples' surprises with other outstanding attractions such as the Royal Palace, San Carlos Opera House, and the Castel Nuovo, dating from the 13th-century. Naples provides a convenient starting point for trips to such favoured destinations as Pompeii, Herculaneum and Mount Vesuvius. When Mount Vesuvius erupted in 79 AD, the population of 20,000 was wiped out, but dozens of buildings were preserved under layers of cinder more than 20 feet deep. The most important finds from Pompeii are displayed in Naples' National Archaeological Museum. A visit here will no doubt enhance a visit to ancient Pompeii. The Isle of Capri can also be reached via a 45-minute hydrofoil service.

Civitavecchia is the cruise gateway to Rome. Italy's vibrant capital lives in the present, but no other city on earth evokes its past so powerfully. For over 2,500 years, emperors, popes, artists, and common citizens have left their mark here. Archaeological remains from ancient Rome, art-stuffed churches, and the treasures of Vatican City vie for your attention, but Rome is also a wonderful place to practice the Italian-perfected il dolce far niente, the sweet art of idleness. Your most memorable experiences may include sitting at a caffè in the Campo de' Fiori or strolling in a beguiling piazza.

Day 12At Sea

Cartagena's magnificent city walls and fortresses, now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, enclose a well-restored historic center (the Cuidad Amurallada, or walled city) with plazas, churches, museums, and shops that have made it a lively coastal vacation spot for South Americans and others. New hotels and restaurants make the walled city a desirable place to stay, and the formerly down-at-the-heels Getsemaní neighborhood attracts those seeking a bohemian buzz. The historic center is a small section of Cartagena; many hotels are in the Bocagrande district, an elongated peninsula where high-rise hotels overlook a long, gray-sand beach.When it was founded in 1533 by Spanish conquistador Pedro de Heredia, Cartagena was the only port on the South American mainland. Gold and silver looted from indigenous peoples passed through here en route to Spain and attracted pirates, including Sir Francis Drake, who in 1586 torched 200 buildings. Cartagena's walls protected the city's riches as well as the New World's most important African slave market.

Tagged on to the end of Iberia, the intriguing British outpost of Gibraltar is dominated by a sandy peninsula and the stunning 1,400-feet-high limestone Rock. Although small, Gibraltar has always been seen as having great strategic importance on account of its advantageous position where the Atlantic meets the Mediterranean, just 12 miles from the coast of Africa. Ever popular with British holidaymakers, Gibraltar is very much a home from home, boasting excellent duty-free shopping in many familiar British high street shops. Please note: Gibraltar’s small size and narrow winding roads mean that excursions are operated by 22-seater mini-buses, accompanied by a driver/guide. Local health and safety regulations prohibit the carriage of walking aids and collapsible wheelchairs on these vehicles. If you do wish to bring a mobility aid, we can arrange the Rock Tour by taxi, which has extra space. If this suits your requirements, please advise the Tours and Travel office when you join the ship, as numbers are limited.

Believed to be the oldest town on the Iberian Peninsula, the Andalusian port of Cádiz enjoys a stunning location at the edge of a six-mile promontory. The town itself, with 3,000 years of history, is characterised by pretty white houses with balconies often adorned with colourful flowers. As you wander around be sure to take a stroll through the sizeable Plaza de Espãna, with its large monument dedicated to the first Spanish constitution, which was signed here in 1812. Cádiz has two pleasant seafront promenades which boast fine views of the Atlantic Ocean, and has a lovely park, the Parque Genoves, located close to the sea with an open-air theatre and attractive palm garden. Also notable is the neo-Classical cathedral, capped by a golden dome.

Day 16At Sea

The infinite variety of street life, the nooks and crannies of the medieval Barri Gòtic, the ceramic tile and stained glass of Art Nouveau facades, the art and music, the throb of street life, the food (ah, the food!)—one way or another, Barcelona will find a way to get your full attention. The capital of Catalonia is a banquet for the senses, with its beguiling mix of ancient and modern architecture, tempting cafés and markets, and sun-drenched Mediterranean beaches. A stroll along La Rambla and through waterfront La Barceloneta, as well as a tour of Gaudí's majestic Sagrada Família and his other unique creations, are essential parts of a visit to Spain's second-largest city. Barcelona's vibe stays lively well into the night, when you can linger over regional wine and cuisine at buzzing tapas bars. Many Mediterranean cruises begin and/or end in Barcelona, and this vibrant city makes the perfect pre or post-cruise holiday extension!

Sagrada Família, Barcelona, Spain

Since being designated a European Capital of Culture for 2013, with an estimated €660 million of funding in the bargain, Marseille has been in the throes of an extraordinary transformation, with no fewer than five major new arts centres, a beautifully refurbished cruise port, revitalised neighbourhoods, and a slew of new shops and restaurants. The spectacular Notre Dame de la Garde is one of the most popular spots to visit in the city, the steep climb to reach the cathedral offers stunning city-wide views. Marseille's Old Port is filled with chic seafood restaurants overlooking yachts and fishing boats. The second-largest city in France, Marseille is one of Europe's most vibrant destinations.

View over Marseille in the South of France

On one of the best stretches of the Mediterranean, this classic luxury destination is one of the most sought-after addresses in the world. With all the high-rise towers you have to look hard to find the Belle Époque grace of yesteryear. But if you head to the town's great 1864 landmark Hôtel de Paris—still a veritable crossroads of the buffed and befurred Euro-gentry—or enjoy a grand bouffe at its famous Louis XV restaurant, or attend the opera, or visit the ballrooms of the casino, you may still be able to conjure up Monaco's elegant past. Prince Albert II, a political science graduate from Amherst College, traces his ancestry to Otto Canella, who was born in 1070. The Grimaldi dynasty began with Otto's great-great-great-grandson, Francesco Grimaldi, also known as Frank the Rogue. Expelled from Genoa, Frank and his cronies disguised themselves as monks and in 1297 seized the fortified medieval town known today as Le Rocher (the Rock). Except for a short break under Napoléon, the Grimaldis have been here ever since, which makes them the oldest reigning family in Europe. In the 1850s a Grimaldi named Charles III made a decision that turned the Rock into a giant blue chip. Needing revenue but not wanting to impose additional taxes on his subjects, he contracted with a company to open a gambling facility. The first spin of the roulette wheel was on December 14, 1856. There was no easy way to reach Monaco then—no carriage roads or railroads—so no one came. Between March 15 and March 20, 1857, one person entered the casino—and won two francs. In 1868, however, the railroad reached Monaco, and it was filled with Englishmen who came to escape the London fog. The effects were immediate. Profits were so great that Charles eventually abolished all direct taxes. Almost overnight, a threadbare principality became an elegant watering hole for European society. Dukes (and their mistresses) and duchesses (and their gigolos) danced and dined their way through a world of spinning roulette wheels and bubbling champagne—preening themselves for nights at the opera, where such artists as Vaslav Nijinsky, Sarah Bernhardt, and Enrico Caruso came to perform. Along with the tax system, its sensational position on a broad, steep peninsula that bulges into the Mediterranean—its harbor sparkling with luxury cruisers, its posh mansions angling awnings toward the nearly perpetual sun—continues to draw the rich and famous. One of the latest French celebrities to declare himself "Monégasque," thus giving up his French passport, is superchef Alain Ducasse, who said that he made the choice out of affection for Monaco rather than tax reasons. Pleasure boats vie with luxury cruisers in their brash beauty and Titanic scale, and teams of handsome young men—themselves dyed blond and tanned to match—scour and polish every gleaming surface. As you might expect, all this glitz doesn't come cheap. Eating is expensive, and even the most modest hotels cost more here than in nearby Nice or Menton. As for taxis, they don't even have meters so you are completely at the driver's mercy (with prices skyrocketing during events such as the Grand Prix). For the frugal, Monaco is the ultimate day-trip, although parking is as coveted as a room with a view. At the very least you can afford a coffee at Starbucks. The harbor district, known as La Condamine, connects the new quarter, officially known as Monte Carlo with Monaco-Ville (or Le Rocher), a medieval town on the Rock, topped by the palace, the cathedral, and the Oceanography Museum. Have no fear that you'll need to climb countless steps to get to Monaco-Ville, as there are plenty of elevators and escalators climbing the steep cliffs. But shuttling between the lovely casino grounds of Monte Carlo and Old Monaco, separated by a vast port, is a daunting proposition for ordinary mortals without wings, so hop on the No. 1 bus from Saint Roman, or No. 2 from the Jardin Exotique - Both stop at Place du Casino and come up to Monaco Ville.

Livorno is the only spot in Tuscany for cruise ships to dock, and is the gateway to Pisa and Florence for thousands of cruise passengers every day. Most of Livorno's artistic treasures date from the 17th century and aren't all that interesting unless you dote on obscure baroque artists. Livorno's most famous native artist, Amedeo Modigliani (1884–1920), was of much more recent vintage. Sadly, there's no notable work by him in his hometown. The Mercato Nuovo, which has been around since 1894, sells all sorts of fruits, vegetables, grains, meat, and fish. Outdoor markets nearby are also chock-full of local colour. The presence of Camp Darby, an American military base just outside town, accounts for the availability of many American products.

Civitavecchia is the cruise gateway to Rome. Italy's vibrant capital lives in the present, but no other city on earth evokes its past so powerfully. For over 2,500 years, emperors, popes, artists, and common citizens have left their mark here. Archaeological remains from ancient Rome, art-stuffed churches, and the treasures of Vatican City vie for your attention, but Rome is also a wonderful place to practice the Italian-perfected il dolce far niente, the sweet art of idleness. Your most memorable experiences may include sitting at a caffè in the Campo de' Fiori or strolling in a beguiling piazza.

The ship Nieuw Statendam

Launched December 2018, Nieuw Statendam carries forward the nautical heritage, signature service and classic style for which Holland America Line is known—while raising the bar for 21st-century elegance. Sister ship to Koningsdam, she’s the second of our Pinnacle-class ships.

Capacity
2650
Total crew
1025
Length
975m

Food and drink

Grab one of our signature burgers by the pool at Dive-In, choose sophisticated ambiance in our elegant dining room, spend a romantic evening in the Pinnacle Grill or enjoy in-room dining any time of day. 

Rudi's Sel de Mer

Sel de Mer ("sea salt," in French) is an intimate seafood brasserie offering a contemporary twist on French seafood classics, with à... Read more

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French

Canaletto

This authentic Italian restaurants offers a menu that celebrates spartire (Italian for "sharing"). Try Braised Chicken Cacciatore "al Forno," Branzino ai Ferri... Read more

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Italian

Tamarind

Tamarind delights with exotic menus evoking the culinary traditions of Southeast Asia, China and Japan. Menus created by Master Chef Rudi Sodamin... Read more

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Asian

Pinnacle Grill

Enjoy dishes inspired by America’s Pacific Northwest, such as king salmon from Alaska and choice, responsibly raised beef from Washington State’s Double... Read more

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American

The Dining Room

For an elegant breakfast, leisurely lunch or unforgettable multi-course dinner, The Dining Room is your destination. Behind the scenes, our Culinary Council,®... Read more

Complimentary
Varies

Lido Market

Lido Market provides a fresh, new approach to casual dining for breakfast, lunch or dinner, with a panoramic view of the sea.... Read more

Complimentary
Buffet

Dive-In

Dive in to a grilled burger on brioche or a Nathan’s Famous gourmet hot dog. For alfresco dining by the pool, Dive-In... Read more

Complimentary
American

New York Pizza & Deli

Served up poolside: crisp Italian salads and personal pan pizzas made with a thin crust and a sauce so savory it does... Read more

Complimentary
Pizzeria

Grand Dutch Cafe

Inspired by our Dutch heritage and complemented with blue-and-white Delftware, the Grand Dutch Cafe is the perfect place to enjoy a fine... Read more

Complimentary
Regional

G Gelato

Enjoy this classic European dessert on ms Koningsdam, made fresh on board in a variety of delicious flavors and styles.

Gelato

Entertainment

Dazzling entertainment options abound on board Nieuw Statendam. The new Lincoln Center Stage and Billboard Onboard venues join the already popular B.B. King’s Blues Club for a complete new “Music Walk” experience. 

Onboard activities abound, including intimate tasting and wine-blending classes at BLEND by Chateau Ste. Michelle. 

B.B King's Blues Club

Direct from Beale Street, the B.B. King’s All-Stars Band brings the best of Memphis music to sea. From funky and fast to... Read more

Lincoln Centre Stage

In an exclusive partnership with the world’s leading center for the performing arts, Lincoln Center Stage showcases outstanding live chamber music performances.

Rolling Stone Bar

Guests are part of the show as live musicians rock the crowd with 50 years of chart-topping hits. Between nightly sets, guests... Read more

World Stage

With its two-story, 270-degree wraparound LED screen surrounding you in high-definition, our World Stage is a dazzling, trendsetting theater where innovation meets... Read more

Casino

From perennially popular slot machines and blackjack tables to the latest in sophisticated gaming, the Casino offers games for all levels, staffed... Read more

Movies Poolside

Complimentary films and popcorn are waiting for you in your ship's movie theatre. Movies can also be enjoyed from the comfort of... Read more

Ocean Bar

Enjoy cocktails and ocean views while listening to live string music.

Notes

With its impressive collection of more than 130 labels, Notes, a dedicated whiskey bar on MS Nieuw Statendam, is an aficionado’s paradise.

Gallery Bar

In this unique art-themed bar, order from a menu created by Master Mixologist Dale DeGroff, a 2015 James Beard Who's Who Inductee.

Piano Bar

Gather around and sing along as our pianist plays your favorites.

Tamarind Bar

Partake in exotic cocktails and sakétinis amid wraparound ocean views.

Lido and Seaview Bars

Sip refreshments poolside in shaded seating around the bar or delivered to your sunny chaise lounge.

Crow's Nest

Enjoy cocktails and breathtaking sunsets in this unique lounge, which features sweeping panoramic views.

Explorer's Lounge

Savor refined coffees, drinks and liqueurs to the sounds of Adagio, a classical ensemble.

Mix

Explore a lively mix of three specialty bars — Champagne, Martinis, and Spirits and Ales.

Holland America Shops

Enjoy a wide variety of duty-free shopping in the Signature Shops such as Merabella, a luxury jewelry boutique featuring high-end watches and... Read more

Health and fitness

Whether you want to workout in the Fitness Centre, learn yoga, pamper yourself with a massage and spa treatment, or enjoy a game of basketball, there's a perfect onboard activity for everyone.

Rejuvenate at our Greenhouse Spa, take a Pilates class or simply relax and unwind.

Greenhouse Spa & Salon

During a leisurely day at sea, few places help you refresh, relax and rejuvenate like the Greenhouse Spa & Salon and Fitness... Read more

Fitness Centre

Take a class in our professionally staffed Fitness Center* equipped with the latest cardio and weight machines. On deck are basketball and... Read more

Kids and teens

Club HAL® provides a wide variety of exciting youth and teen-friendly activities for guests ages 3 to 17, supervised by full-time staff with degrees in education, recreation, childhood development or related fields.

Kids ages 3–7: Younger cruisers enjoy activities such as pirate treasure hunts, ice cream parties, storytelling and “Little Artists” crafts.

'Tweens ages 8 –12: 'Tweens can take part in video game tournaments, relay races, karaoke dance parties and more.

Teens ages 13–17: Enjoy mocktail mixology classes, late night sporting competitions, hip hop classes, guys verses girls scavenger hunts, tech classes and teen-only night club events. 

Enrichment

Boasting an expansive range of enrichment facilities and opportunity, Holland America Line's ships are bound to offer something you'll want to know more about. 


Explorations Central

Explorations Central™ (EXC®), Holland America Line’s exclusive destination programming, is designed to deepen your understanding of the places you visit. Its indispensable... Read more

BLEND

Wine connoisseurs and novices alike can experience the art of winemaking at BLEND by Chateau Ste. Michelle, Washington State’s oldest and most... Read more

BBC Earth Experiences

We have partnered with BBC Earth to bring you unforgettable new ways to experience the world's natural wonders. Through the innovative and... Read more

Port To Table

Each voyage brings a guest chef on board to guide you through the culinary traditions of your destinations. Try local flavors at... Read more

EXC Culture

Join us for entertaining performances that reflect the cultures and traditions of the destinations you visit. From elaborate stage shows highlighting Tahitian... Read more

O, The Oprah Magazine Partnership

Holland America Line has partnered with O, The Oprah Magazine to combine the eye-opening, life-changing wonder of travel with the soul-expanding content... Read more

Useful info

Disabled Facilities

Service Animals

Holland America Line only permits service animals onboard, defined as those animals that are individually trained to provide assistance to an... Read more

Special Dietary Requirements

For guests with food intolerances or allergies that are not life-threatening, please contact the Ship Services Department. For guests with life-threatening food... Read more

Age Restrictions

Guests under 21 years of age must be accompanied by a parent, guardian or chaperone who is at least 21 years old;... Read more

Dress Code

The right clothing can make a big difference in the enjoyment of your cruise. First and foremost, dress for comfort. Daily life... Read more

E-Cigarette Policy

Electronic cigarettes are permitted in staterooms but not in other public areas of the ship other than on outside decks designated as... Read more

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* Passengers should be aged under 18 at the time of embarkation to qualify as a child.
Prices shown are per person based on two people sharing (unless otherwise specfied) in GBP and subject to availability. Certain restrictions can apply. Prices are updated on a daily basis and may vary when continuing through the booking process.