Celebrity Cruises

15-night Bering Sea & Japan Transpacific

Celebrity Solstice

Celebrity Solstice® is one of our most decorated ships. So it's no wonder that it's full of "firsts." The first Lawn Club at sea.

Explore the ship
Itinerary highlights
Vancouver Canada
Sitka Alaska
Hakodate Japan
Ship highlights
Photo of the Tuscan Grille Tuscan Grille
Photo of the Beyond the Podium Beyond the Podium
Photo of the Let's Dance Let's Dance
from
£1,219
per person
from
£81
per night
Free cancellation up to 30 days before you sail through 30 April 2022
10 Sep 2021
£1,219
10 Sep 2021
£1,419
10 Sep 2021
£1,639 £1,619
10 Sep 2021
Book from £1,219 Email me this cruise

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Cancel your cruise for free up to 48 hours before your sail date and get a future cruise credit valid for at least 12 months. Applies to any booking made before 31st January 2021.

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The itinerary

Vancouver is a delicious juxtaposition of urban sophistication and on-your-doorstep wilderness adventure. The mountains and seascape make the city an outdoor playground for hiking, skiing, kayaking, cycling, and sailing—and so much more—while the cuisine and arts scenes are equally diverse, reflecting the makeup of Vancouver's ethnic (predominantly Asian) mosaic. Vancouver is consistently ranked as one of the world's most liveable cities, and it's easy for visitors to see why. It's beautiful, it's outdoorsy, and there's a laidback West Coast vibe. On the one hand, there's easy access to a variety of outdoor activities, a fabulous variety of beaches, and amazing parks. At the same time, the city has a multicultural vitality and cosmopolitan flair. People often get their first glimpse of Vancouver when embarking on an Alaskan cruise, and many return at some point to spend more time here.

Day 2At sea

It's hard not to like Sitka, with its eclectic blend of Alaska Native, Russian, and American history and its dramatic and beautiful open-ocean setting. This is one of the best Inside Passage towns to explore on foot, with St. Michael's Cathedral, Sheldon Jackson Museum, Castle Hill, Sitka National Historical Park, and the Alaska Raptor Center topping the must-see list.Sitka was home to the Kiksádi clan of the Tlingit people for centuries prior to the 18th-century arrival of the Russians under the direction of territorial governor Alexander Baranof, who believed the region was ideal for the fur trade. The governor also coveted the Sitka site for its beauty, mild climate, and economic potential; in the island's massive timber forests he saw raw materials for shipbuilding. Its location offered trading routes as far west as Asia and as far south as California and Hawaii. In 1799 Baranof built St. Michael Archangel—a wooden fort and trading post 6 miles north of the present town.Strong disagreements arose shortly after the settlement. The Tlingits attacked the settlers and burned their buildings in 1802. Baranof, however, was away in Kodiak at the time. He returned in 1804 with a formidable force—including shipboard cannons—and attacked the Tlingits at their fort near Indian River, site of the present-day 105-acre Sitka National Historical Park, forcing many of them north to Chichagof Island.By 1821 the Tlingits had reached an accord with the Russians, who were happy to benefit from the tribe's hunting skills. Under Baranof and succeeding managers, the Russian-American Company and the town prospered, becoming known as the Paris of the Pacific. The community built a major shipbuilding and repair facility, sawmills, and forges, and even initiated an ice industry, shipping blocks of ice from nearby Swan Lake to the booming San Francisco market. The settlement that was the site of the 1802 conflict is now called Old Sitka. It is a state park and listed as a National Historic Landmark.The town declined after its 1867 transfer from Russia to the United States, but it became prosperous again during World War II, when it served as a base for the U.S. effort to drive the Japanese from the Aleutian Islands. Today its most important industries are fishing, government, and tourism.

Day 4At sea

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Day 8International Dateline , At Sea

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Day 12At sea

Facing out on two bays, Hakodate is a 19th-century port town, with clapboard buildings on sloping streets, a dockside tourist zone, streetcars, and fresh fish on every menu. In the downtown historic quarter, a mountain rises 1,100 feet above the city on the southern point of the narrow peninsula. Russians, Americans, Chinese, and Europeans have all left their mark; this was one of the first three Japanese ports the Meiji government opened up to international trade in 1859. The main sights around the foot of Mt. Hakodate can be done in a day, but the city is best appreciated with an overnight stay for the illumination in the historic area, the night views from either the mountain or the fort tower, and the fish market at dawn. City transport is easy to navigate and English information is readily available. Evening departure trains from Tokyo arrive here at dawn—perfect for fish-market breakfasts.

Day 15At sea

In 1853, a fleet of four American warships under Commodore Matthew Perry sailed into the bay of Tokyo (then Edo) and presented the reluctant Japanese with the demands of the U.S. government for the opening of diplomatic and commercial relations. The following year Perry returned and first set foot on Japanese soil at Yokohama—then a small fishing village on the mudflats of Tokyo bay. Two years later New York businessman Townsend Harris became America's first diplomatic representative to Japan. In 1858 he was finally able to negotiate a commercial treaty between the two countries; part of the deal designated four locations—one of them Yokohama—as treaty ports. In 1859 the shogunate created a special settlement in Yokohama for the growing community of merchants, traders, missionaries, and other assorted adventurers drawn to this exotic new land of opportunity. The foreigners (predominantly Chinese and British, plus a few French, Americans, and Dutch) were confined here to a guarded compound about 5 square km (2 square miles)—placed, in effect, in isolation—but not for long. Within a few short years the shogunal government collapsed, and Japan began to modernize. Western ideas were welcomed, as were Western goods, and the little treaty port became Japan's principal gateway to the outside world. In 1872 Japan's first railway was built, linking Yokohama and Tokyo. In 1889 Yokohama became a city; by then the population had grown to some 120,000. As the city prospered, so did the international community and by the early 1900s Yokohama was the busiest and most modern center of international trade in all of East Asia. Then Yokohama came tumbling down. On September 1, 1923, the Great Kanto Earthquake devastated the city. The ensuing fires destroyed some 60,000 homes and took more than 40,000 lives. During the six years it took to rebuild the city, many foreign businesses took up quarters elsewhere, primarily in Kobe and Osaka, and did not return. Over the next 20 years Yokohama continued to grow as an industrial center—until May 29, 1945, when in a span of four hours, some 500 American B-29 bombers leveled nearly half the city and left more than half a million people homeless. When the war ended, what remained became—in effect—the center of the Allied occupation. General Douglas MacArthur set up headquarters here, briefly, before moving to Tokyo; the entire port facility and about a quarter of the city remained in the hands of the U.S. military throughout the 1950s. By the 1970s Yokohama was once more rising from the debris; in 1978 it surpassed Osaka as the nation's second-largest city, and the population is now inching up to the 3.5 million mark. Boosted by Japan's postwar economic miracle, Yokohama has extended its urban sprawl north to Tokyo and south to Kamakura—in the process creating a whole new subcenter around the Shinkansen Station at Shin-Yokohama. The development of air travel and the competition from other ports have changed the city's role in Japan's economy. The great liners that once docked at Yokohama's piers are now but a memory, kept alive by a museum ship and the occasional visit of a luxury vessel on a Pacific cruise. Modern Large as Yokohama is, the central area is very negotiable. As with any other port city, much of what it has to offer centers on the waterfront—in this case, on the west side of Tokyo Bay. The downtown area is called Kannai (literally, "within the checkpoint"); this is where the international community was originally confined by the shogunate. Though the center of interest has expanded to include the waterfront and Ishikawa-cho, to the south, Kannai remains the heart of town. Think of that heart as two adjacent areas. One is the old district of Kannai, bounded by Basha-michi on the northwest and Nippon-odori on the southeast, the Keihin Tohoku Line tracks on the southwest, and the waterfront on the northeast. This area contains the business offices of modern Yokohama. The other area extends southeast from Nippon-odori to the Moto-machi shopping street and the International Cemetery, bordered by Yamashita Koen and the waterfront to the northeast; in the center is Chinatown, with Ishikawa-cho Station to the southwest. This is the most interesting part of town for tourists. Whether you're coming from Tokyo, Nagoya, or Kamakura, make Ishikawa-cho Station your starting point. Take the South Exit from the station and head in the direction of the waterfront.

In 1853, a fleet of four American warships under Commodore Matthew Perry sailed into the bay of Tokyo (then Edo) and presented the reluctant Japanese with the demands of the U.S. government for the opening of diplomatic and commercial relations. The following year Perry returned and first set foot on Japanese soil at Yokohama—then a small fishing village on the mudflats of Tokyo bay. Two years later New York businessman Townsend Harris became America's first diplomatic representative to Japan. In 1858 he was finally able to negotiate a commercial treaty between the two countries; part of the deal designated four locations—one of them Yokohama—as treaty ports. In 1859 the shogunate created a special settlement in Yokohama for the growing community of merchants, traders, missionaries, and other assorted adventurers drawn to this exotic new land of opportunity. The foreigners (predominantly Chinese and British, plus a few French, Americans, and Dutch) were confined here to a guarded compound about 5 square km (2 square miles)—placed, in effect, in isolation—but not for long. Within a few short years the shogunal government collapsed, and Japan began to modernize. Western ideas were welcomed, as were Western goods, and the little treaty port became Japan's principal gateway to the outside world. In 1872 Japan's first railway was built, linking Yokohama and Tokyo. In 1889 Yokohama became a city; by then the population had grown to some 120,000. As the city prospered, so did the international community and by the early 1900s Yokohama was the busiest and most modern center of international trade in all of East Asia. Then Yokohama came tumbling down. On September 1, 1923, the Great Kanto Earthquake devastated the city. The ensuing fires destroyed some 60,000 homes and took more than 40,000 lives. During the six years it took to rebuild the city, many foreign businesses took up quarters elsewhere, primarily in Kobe and Osaka, and did not return. Over the next 20 years Yokohama continued to grow as an industrial center—until May 29, 1945, when in a span of four hours, some 500 American B-29 bombers leveled nearly half the city and left more than half a million people homeless. When the war ended, what remained became—in effect—the center of the Allied occupation. General Douglas MacArthur set up headquarters here, briefly, before moving to Tokyo; the entire port facility and about a quarter of the city remained in the hands of the U.S. military throughout the 1950s. By the 1970s Yokohama was once more rising from the debris; in 1978 it surpassed Osaka as the nation's second-largest city, and the population is now inching up to the 3.5 million mark. Boosted by Japan's postwar economic miracle, Yokohama has extended its urban sprawl north to Tokyo and south to Kamakura—in the process creating a whole new subcenter around the Shinkansen Station at Shin-Yokohama. The development of air travel and the competition from other ports have changed the city's role in Japan's economy. The great liners that once docked at Yokohama's piers are now but a memory, kept alive by a museum ship and the occasional visit of a luxury vessel on a Pacific cruise. Modern Large as Yokohama is, the central area is very negotiable. As with any other port city, much of what it has to offer centers on the waterfront—in this case, on the west side of Tokyo Bay. The downtown area is called Kannai (literally, "within the checkpoint"); this is where the international community was originally confined by the shogunate. Though the center of interest has expanded to include the waterfront and Ishikawa-cho, to the south, Kannai remains the heart of town. Think of that heart as two adjacent areas. One is the old district of Kannai, bounded by Basha-michi on the northwest and Nippon-odori on the southeast, the Keihin Tohoku Line tracks on the southwest, and the waterfront on the northeast. This area contains the business offices of modern Yokohama. The other area extends southeast from Nippon-odori to the Moto-machi shopping street and the International Cemetery, bordered by Yamashita Koen and the waterfront to the northeast; in the center is Chinatown, with Ishikawa-cho Station to the southwest. This is the most interesting part of town for tourists. Whether you're coming from Tokyo, Nagoya, or Kamakura, make Ishikawa-cho Station your starting point. Take the South Exit from the station and head in the direction of the waterfront.

The ship Celebrity Solstice

Celebrity Solstice® is one of our most decorated ships. So it's no wonder that it's full of "firsts." The first Lawn Club at sea.

Capacity
2850
Cabins
1426
Total crew
1284
Length
1041m

Food and drink

Offering a variety of seating options. Passengers can chose from traditional, set table seating at 6pm or 8.30pm, or Celebrity Select - the choice to dine any time between 6.30pm – 9pm. Advanced bookings are available as is the option to show up when you like.

Tuscan Grille

An Italian ristorante and enoteca with a contemporary twist.

Rustic elegance with a contemporary, minimalistic edge. Guests dining in Tuscan Grille will enjoy... Read more

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Italian

Main Restaurant

A grand stage for fine dining.

This sophisticated restaurant with a wide range of globally-inspired dishes created by a Michelin-starred chef will provide... Read more

Complimentary
Classic

24-hour Room Service

Enjoy Celebrity’s delectable dining delivered right to your stateroom or suite, complimentary and at any time.

Tired from a day of exploring? Whether... Read more

Complimentary
Room

Murano

As timeless as it is modern, the sophisticated ambience of Murano is reflected in the impeccable service and accomplished contemporary take on... Read more

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French

Cafe al Bacio & Gelateria

Traditional European coffeehouse offering guests a variety of traditional gelatos and Italian ices, pastries and specialty coffees.

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Cafe

Blu

AquaClass® guests can enjoy Blu, their own exclusive restaurant for breakfast and dinner. The cuisine at Blu is simply an imaginative way of... Read more

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International

Oceanview Cafe

This café's décor and offerings reflect that of an international marketplace. With a menu influenced by multiple cultures, the cuisine takes diners... Read more
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Cafe

Spa Cafe + Juice Bar

Extend Your Spa Experience.

A creative take on healthy cuisine, featuring an eclectic blend of offerings that are both flavorful and good for... Read more

Complimentary
Cafe

Sushi on Five

Every sushi lovers dream

Sushi restaurants. Wildly popular from the day it appeared, Sushi on Five satisfies your craving for locally sourced, authentically... Read more

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Japanese

Le Petit Chef

A one-of-a-kind dining concept.

Experience the fusion of entertainment and cuisine. We’ve brought the table top to life in a fantastic fusion of... Read more

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Varies

Entertainment

A mixture of contemporary, classic and innovative forms of entertainment can be found onboard. Classic entertainment options include a two-deck library, art gallery, cinema, card room, quizzes and trivia contests. Pool volleyball, lawn games and video games are also on offer.

Passport Bar

Wind down with a cocktail and classical music.

Relaxing and inviting, its position right off the grand foyer means this may be the... Read more

Observation Lounge

The Sky Observation Lounge, with its floor to ceiling windows overlooking the front of the ship, provides guests with breathtaking views to... Read more

Cellar Masters

Cellar Masters, is Solstice's wine bar which allows guests to try a wide range of wines from a collection of both familiar... Read more

Celebrity Central

Celebrity Central, located on deck 4, is the ship's second entertainment venue offering guests a range of lively and diverse entertainment from... Read more

Theatre

The Main Theatre is the place to sit back and be entertained – the talented Celebrity Cruises entertainment team will dazzle you... Read more

Art Gallery

Refined culture at sea is what you will experience in Celebrity's inspiring and thought-provoking Art Gallery. Stop in on your way to... Read more

Fortunes Casino

Feeling lucky? Combining the ambience of Monte Carlo and the energy of Las Vegas, Fortunes Casino is a perfect spot to participate... Read more

Martini Bar & Crush

On the totally cool, ice-topped bar, the talented bartenders put on a high-energy show preparing an intriguing menu of classic and contemporary... Read more

Sunset Bar

Relaxing and inviting, its position right off the Grand Foyer means this may be the first, but not the last, place you... Read more

Ensemble Lounge

The Ensemble Lounge, with its "dressed for dinner" gathering, is the ideal place for a drink before or after dining featuring live... Read more

Quasar

Quasar, is Solstice's vibrant nightclub. During the day events such as Wii and X-Box game competitions take place.

Lawn Club Grill

A half acre of real grass on the top deck, where a casual country club ambience comes as standard. 

World Class Bar

Some drinks are worth waiting for…

Welcome to our “fine drinking” experience, where the ritual of making cocktails is just as exciting as... Read more

Library

With over 2,000 books on subjects ranging from classic to popular biographies, history to contemporary mysteries. A selection of 1,000 DVDs and... Read more

Health and fitness

Whether you want to clear your mind, fine-tune your body, reinvigorate your spirit – or all of the above – The Spa is an indulgent escape where you can do it all. The Spa introduced an array of innovative new firsts in beauty, fitness and wellness that make finding complete bliss on holiday easier than ever. 

The Spa

Begin your spa journey by selecting from more than 120 treatments for a spa experience unlike anything else at sea. Discover ground-breaking... Read more

Fitness Centre

In the fitness centre you can meet with a personal trainer, take a fitness class, try our resistance swimming pool or challenge... Read more

Persian Garden

Accompanied by the calming strains of new age music, enjoy the warmth of a relaxing steam or treat your skin to the... Read more

Solarium

Find true poolside serenity at the Solarium. Featuring a gorgeous pool, sparkling waterfalls, thickly padded lounge chairs, and an adults-only policy, tranquility... Read more

Sports

Practise skills on your own, play with old or new friends, or take part in a tournament with one of the Celebrity... Read more

Pool Area

The Pool Area comprises of two pools separated by a bridge, with the forward one being the deeper sports pool and the... Read more

Kids and teens

Celebrity Cruises offer many unique family-friendly activities, as well as more traditional children’s clubs. Designed for children of all ages and interests, each program is geared towards a specific age group and supervised by an experienced youth staff member.

XClub

Younger cruisers ages 12-17 can cut loose and kick back the way they want in our hip VIP area geared specifically for... Read more

Fun Factory

Designed exclusively for junior cruisers, Fun Factory is a place where magic happens. Children age 3-11 will thrive in this environment, which... Read more

ShipMates

ShipMates offers plenty of games to play and activities to take part in specifically for children age 3-5.

Largest Xbox Experience at Sea

Dedicated Xbox stations and mobile consoles. Solo, tournament and theme nights for kids, teens and adults. The latest releases, all free to... Read more

iTake

Video project just for teens. From story boarding to filming and editing, prizes are awarded for numerous film category winners at the... Read more

Enrichment

In association with Rosetta Stone and Apple, Celebrity offers an impressive range of educational activities and guest speakers during most of their sailings. Learn how to dance, brush up on your language skills, or take in a unique hot glass show - the first at sea.

Beyond the Podium

Speaker series, covering a range of topics exploring the culture, history and biology of some of the destinations visited during each cruise

Let's Dance

A series of salsa, jive, ballroom and modern dance classes.

Ocean's Ahead

Talks from the Ship’s Officers, giving an insight into the workings of the ship; from navigation to recycling and solar power.

Rosetta Stone Language Sessions

Learn the basics of how to order in the local language of the next port of call, brush up on existing language... Read more

Art Classes and Lectures

Held in the art studio, meet resident artists or attend interactive classes and demonstrations, covering topics from jewellery making to sketching and... Read more

Useful info

Disabled Facilities

You may bring and use wheelchairs, mobility scooters and other assistive devices onboard our ships. Due to safety regulations, Segways may not... Read more

Special Dietary Requirements

Celebrity Cruises makes every effort to accommodate guest’s dietary requirements wherever possible. Most dietary needs can be catered for such as:
Vegetarian, Gluten... Read more

Age Restrictions

Drinking:
The minimum drinking age for all alcoholic beverages on all Celebrity Cruises ships is 21 years of age.
However, on ships sailing from... Read more

Dress Code

A Celebrity cruise is a step into luxury, so it’s the perfect opportunity to dress up for dining every evening.
Whether enjoying... Read more

Dining Packages

Onboard Celebrity’s ships you can experience several unique speciality restaurants and enjoy great savings when you purchase one of their Speciality Dining... Read more

Drinks Packages

How do I book a beverage package?

The packages can be pre-reserved up to a minimum of four days before your sail... Read more

Smoking Policy

If you wish to smoke, please use one of the designated areas outdoors. Smoking is not permitted in any of the dining... Read more

WiFi Access

All Celebrity Millennium® and Celebrity Solstice® Class ships are fully wireless and also have an internet area. Celebrity Xpedition has dial up... Read more

Environment

Lighting

We’re replacing higher wattage halogen and incandescent light bulbs with longer lasting fluorescent and Light Emitting Diode (LED) lights throughout our fleet.... Read more

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* Passengers should be aged under 18 at the time of embarkation to qualify as a child.
Prices shown are per person based on two people sharing (unless otherwise specfied) in GBP and subject to availability. Certain restrictions can apply. Prices are updated on a daily basis and may vary when continuing through the booking process.