Princess Cruises

14-night Scandinavia & Russia Collection

Island Princess

Custom-built to sail through the Panama Canal, this cruise ship offers exclusive features for a unique cruise experience.

Explore the ship
Itinerary highlights
Boats in Southampton Harbour Southampton United Kingdom
The city of Riga, Latvia from above Riga Latvia
Helsinki Finland
Ship highlights
Photo of the Traditional Dining Room- Provence Dining Room Traditional Dining Room- Provence Dining Room
Photo of the Edutainment Edutainment
from
£1,999
per person
from
£143
per night
Free cancellation up to 30 days before you sail through 30 April 2021
26 Aug 2021
£2,499 £1,999
26 Aug 2021
£2,599 £2,199
26 Aug 2021
£2,100
26 Aug 2021
£3,224 £2,674
Book from £1,999 Email me this cruise

Cruise with Confidence

Cancel your cruise for free up to 30 days before your sail date and get a future cruise credit in the amount of non-refundable fees (the remainder will be refunded to you). Applies to sailings departing through 30 April 2021.

Find out more

The itinerary

Southampton is the UK's largest and busiest cruise port, catering for over 1.5 million passengers every year. Located just a two hour drive out of London, or an 80-minute train journey, Southampton has a rich history on display across the city's museums and cultural venues, as well as leading shopping shopping outlets, many restaurants and bars, and award-winning public parks. Walking around the city centre, you'll see many remnants of the ancient city walls, don't miss the Bargate Monument – a Grade I-listed medieval gatehouse. Further afield, you can take in the sights of nearby cities of Portsmouth and Winchester, or visit the world-renowned heritage site of Stonehenge.

Boats in Southampton Harbour

Day 2At Sea

Day 4At Sea

Rīga has an upscale, big-city feel unmatched in the region. The capital (almost as large as Tallinn and Vilnius combined) is the business center of the area while original, high-quality restaurants and hotels have earned Rīga some bragging rights among its Western European counterparts. The city also doesn't lack for beauty—Rīga's Old Town (now a UNESCO World Heritage site) is one of Europe’s most striking examples of the art nouveau architectural style. Long avenues of complex and sometimes whimsical Jugendstil facades hint at Rīga's grand past. Many were designed by Mikhail Eisenstein, the father of Soviet director Sergei. This style dominates the city center. In many ways, the wonder of Rīga resides less in its individual attractions and more in the fabric of the town itself. In the medieval Old Town, an ornate gable or architrave catches the eye at every turn. The somber and the flamboyant are both represented in this quarter's 1,000 years of architectural history. Don't hesitate to just follow where your desire leads—the Old Town is compact and bounded by canals, so it's difficult to get totally lost. When the Old Town eventually became too crowded, the city burst out into the newer inner suburbs. The rich could afford to leave and build themselves fine fashionable mansions in the style of the day; consequently, city planners created a whole new Rīga. Across the narrow canal, you'll find the Esplanāde, a vast expanse of parkland with formal gardens and period mansions where the well-heeled stroll and play. Surrounding this is the art nouveau district. Encompassing avenues of splendid family homes (now spruced up in the postcommunist era), the collection has been praised by UNESCO as Europe's finest in the art nouveau style. The best examples are at Alberta 2, 2a, 4, 6, 8, and 13; Elizabetes 10b; and Strēlnieku 4a. If the weather permits, eschew public transport and stroll between the two districts, taking in the varied skylines and multifaceted facades, and perhaps stopping at a café or two as you go. The city has churches in five Christian denominations and more than 50 museums, many of which cater to eclectic or specialist tastes.

The city of Riga, Latvia from above

A city of the sea, Helsinki was built along a series of oddly shaped peninsulas and islands jutting into the Baltic coast along the Gulf of Finland. Streets and avenues curve around bays, bridges reach to nearby islands, and ferries ply among offshore islands.Having grown dramatically since World War II, Helsinki now absorbs more than one-tenth of the Finnish population. The metro area covers 764 square km (474 square miles) and 315 islands. Most sights, hotels, and restaurants cluster on one peninsula, forming a compact central hub. The greater Helsinki metropolitan area, which includes Espoo and Vantaa, has a total population of more than a million people.Helsinki is a relatively young city compared with other European capitals. In the 16th century, King Gustav Vasa of Sweden decided to woo trade from the Estonian city of Tallinn and thus challenge the Hanseatic League's monopoly on Baltic trade. Accordingly, he commanded the people of four Finnish towns to pack up their belongings and relocate to the rapids on the River Vantaa. The new town, founded on June 12, 1550, was named Helsinki.For three centuries, Helsinki (Helsingfors in Swedish) had its ups and downs as a trading town. Turku, to the west, remained Finland's capital and intellectual center. However, Helsinki's fortunes improved when Finland fell under Russian rule as an autonomous grand duchy. Czar Alexander I wanted Finland's political center closer to Russia and, in 1812, selected Helsinki as the new capital. Shortly afterward, Turku suffered a disastrous fire, forcing the university to move to Helsinki. The town's future was secure.Just before the czar's proclamation, a fire destroyed many of Helsinki's traditional wooden structures, precipitating the construction of new buildings suitable for a nation's capital. The German-born architect Carl Ludvig Engel was commissioned to rebuild the city, and as a result, Helsinki has some of the purest neoclassical architecture in the world. Add to this foundation the influence of Stockholm and St. Petersburg with the local inspiration of 20th-century Finnish design, and the result is a European capital city that is as architecturally eye-catching as it is distinct from other Scandinavian capitals. You are bound to discover endless engaging details—a grimacing gargoyle; a foursome of males supporting a balcony's weight on their shoulders; a building painted in striking colors with contrasting flowers in the windows. The city's 400 or so parks make it particularly inviting in summer.Today, Helsinki is still a meeting point of eastern and western Europe, which is reflected in its cosmopolitan image, the influx of Russians and Estonians, and generally multilingual population. Outdoor summer bars ("terrassit" as the locals call them) and cafés in the city center are perfect for people watching on a summer afternoon.

Commissioned by Tsar Peter the Great (1672–1725) as "a window looking into Europe," St. Petersburg is a planned city whose elegance is reminiscent of Europe's most alluring capitals. Little wonder it's the darling of fashion photographers and travel essayists today: built on more than a hundred islands in the Neva Delta linked by canals and arched bridges, it was called the "Venice of the North" by Goethe, and its stately embankments are reminiscent of those in Paris. A city of golden spires and gilded domes, of pastel palaces and candlelit cathedrals, this city conceived by a visionary emperor is filled with pleasures and tantalizing treasures. With its strict geometric lines and perfectly planned architecture, so unlike the Russian cities that came before it, St. Petersburg is almost too European to be Russian. And yet it's too Russian to be European. The city is a powerful combination of both East and West, springing from the will and passion of its founder to guide a resistant Russia into the greater fold of Europe, and consequently into the mainstream of history. That he accomplished, and more. With a population of nearly 5 million, St. Petersburg is the fourth largest city in Europe after Paris, Moscow, and London. Without as many of the fashionably modern buildings that a business center like Moscow acquires, the city has managed to preserve much more of its history. Here, you can imagine yourself back in the time of the tsars and Dostoyevsky. Although it's a close race, it's safe to say that most visitors prefer St. Petersburg's culture, history, and beauty to Moscow's glamour and power. That said, St. Petersburg has begun to play a more active role in politics in recent years, as if it were the country's northern capital. St. Petersburg revels in its historic beauty but also embraces the new.

Commissioned by Tsar Peter the Great (1672–1725) as "a window looking into Europe," St. Petersburg is a planned city whose elegance is reminiscent of Europe's most alluring capitals. Little wonder it's the darling of fashion photographers and travel essayists today: built on more than a hundred islands in the Neva Delta linked by canals and arched bridges, it was called the "Venice of the North" by Goethe, and its stately embankments are reminiscent of those in Paris. A city of golden spires and gilded domes, of pastel palaces and candlelit cathedrals, this city conceived by a visionary emperor is filled with pleasures and tantalizing treasures. With its strict geometric lines and perfectly planned architecture, so unlike the Russian cities that came before it, St. Petersburg is almost too European to be Russian. And yet it's too Russian to be European. The city is a powerful combination of both East and West, springing from the will and passion of its founder to guide a resistant Russia into the greater fold of Europe, and consequently into the mainstream of history. That he accomplished, and more. With a population of nearly 5 million, St. Petersburg is the fourth largest city in Europe after Paris, Moscow, and London. Without as many of the fashionably modern buildings that a business center like Moscow acquires, the city has managed to preserve much more of its history. Here, you can imagine yourself back in the time of the tsars and Dostoyevsky. Although it's a close race, it's safe to say that most visitors prefer St. Petersburg's culture, history, and beauty to Moscow's glamour and power. That said, St. Petersburg has begun to play a more active role in politics in recent years, as if it were the country's northern capital. St. Petersburg revels in its historic beauty but also embraces the new.

Estonia's history is sprinkled liberally with long stretches of foreign domination, beginning in 1219 with the Danes, followed without interruption by the Germans, Swedes, and Russians. Only after World War I, with Russia in revolutionary wreckage, was Estonia able to declare its independence. Shortly before World War II, in 1940, that independence was usurped by the Soviets, who—save for a brief three-year occupation by Hitler's Nazis—proceeded to suppress all forms of national Estonian pride for the next 50 years. Estonia finally regained independence in 1991. In the early 1990s, Estonia's own Riigikogu (Parliament), not some other nation's puppet ruler, handed down from the Upper City reforms that forced Estonia to blaze its post-Soviet trail to the European Union. Estonia has been a member of the EU since 2004, and in 2011, the country and its growing economy joined the Eurozone. Tallinn was also named the European City of Culture in 2011, cementing its growing reputation as a cultural hot spot.

Stockholm is a city in the flush of its second youth. Since the mid-1990s, Sweden's capital has emerged from its cold, Nordic shadow to take the stage as a truly international city. What started with entry into the European Union in 1995 gained pace with the extraordinary IT boom of the late 1990s, strengthened with the Skype-led IT second wave of 2003, and solidified with the hedge-fund invasion that is still happening today as Stockholm gains even more global confidence. And despite more recent economic turmoil, Stockholm's 1 million or so inhabitants have, almost as one, realized that their city is one to rival Paris, London, New York, or any other great metropolis.With this realization comes change. Stockholm has become a city of design, fashion, innovation, technology, and world-class food, pairing homegrown talent with an international outlook. The streets are flowing with a young and confident population keen to drink in everything the city has to offer. The glittering feeling of optimism, success, and living in the here and now is rampant in Stockholm.Stockholm also has plenty of history. Positioned where the waters of Lake Mälaren rush into the Baltic, it’s been an important trading site and a wealthy international city for centuries. Built on 14 islands joined by bridges crossing open bays and narrow channels, Stockholm boasts the story of its history in its glorious medieval old town, grand palaces, ancient churches, sturdy edifices, public parks, and 19th-century museums—its history is soaked into the very fabric of its airy boulevards, built as a public display of trading glory.

Gotland is Sweden's main holiday island, a place of ancient history, a relaxed summer-party vibe, wide sandy beaches, and wild cliff formations called raukar (the remnants of reefs formed more than 400 million years ago). Measuring 125 km (78 miles) long and 52 km (32 miles) at its widest point, Gotland is where Swedish sheep farming has its home. In its charming glades, 35 varieties of wild orchids thrive, attracting botanists from all over the world.

Visby in Sweden

Day 14At Sea

Copenhagen is the largest city in Scandinavia and the capital of Denmark. The city is regularly named one of the best cities to visit and live in the world. Some of its famous attractions including the Gefion Fountain and Amalienborg Palace, take a river boat along the city’s waterways, visit Rosenborg Castle or explore the medieval fishing village of Dragoer. Once the home of Hans Christian Andersen, Copenhagen features many reminders of its fairytale heritage, the most famous being The Little Mermaid statue on the Langelinie promenade. Copenhagen has three cruise terminals, most large ships dock in Ocean Quay, which is located around two miles outside of the city centre.

Nyhavn 17, Copenhagen

The ship Island Princess

Custom-built to sail through the Panama Canal, this cruise ship offers exclusive features for a unique cruise experience.

Capacity
2200
Cabins
987
Total crew
900
Length
964m

Food and drink

The Princess chefs are true culinary artists who insist on serving the very finest cuisine - and it shows. The entire fleet has been inducted into the prestigious Chaîne des Rôtisseurs gastronomic society. Each chef's menu is creative and the selections change every day. Pair that with impeccable service and you're in for an unforgettable gourmet experience.

Traditional Dining Room- Provence Dining Room

This ship offers a formal dining room in the cruise tradition, with Traditional Dining at the same times for each meal, with... Read more

Complimentary
Classic

Sabatini's

This Italian restaurant is a refined yet casual dining establishment rich in atmosphere, showcasing an Italian and Mediterranean menu with a heavy... Read more

Cover
Italian

Bayou Café & Steakhouse

Passengers are able to enjoy jazz music along with traditional Cajun and Creole-infused dishes in the very first New Orleans restaurant at... Read more

Cover
New Orleans

Ultimate Balcony Dining

Stay in for dinner and enjoy the Ultimate Balcony Dining Experience, delivered right to the comfort of your own balcony.

Cover
Room

Horizon Court Buffet

Get a quick and satisfying bite whenever you like at the ship's Casual Dining eateries, or get take-out and dine by the... Read more

Complimentary
Buffet

Patisserie

Get a quick and satisfying bite whenever you like at our Casual Dining eateries, or get take-out and dine by the pool.

Complimentary
Bakery

Casual Eating

Get a quick and satisfying bite whenever you like at our Casual Dining eateries, or get take-out and dine by the pool.

Trident... Read more

Cover
Varies

Anytime Dining- Bordeaux Dining Room

Anytime Dining means you aren't limited to eating at a fixed time or place on the ship. Instead, the choice of when... Read more

Complimentary
Classic

Entertainment

To say the nightlife onboard is entertaining is an understatement. Illuminating the stage in captivating productions, Princess Cruises performers are some of the most talented musicians, singers and dancers at sea. Their Princess Signature Shows, lounge performers, movies and casinos are just some of the entertainment guests enjoy as they escape completely.

Princess Theatre

Princess Cruises largest theatre yet, with sophisticated architectural lighting. West End-style shows are on every cruise, with more than one performance each... Read more

Movies Under The Stars

Boasting a giant screen 30% larger than Princess Cruises other ships, this signature poolside venue presents first-run movies, sporting events and concerts... Read more

The Casino

This London-themed casino features an array of the latest slots and your favourite games of chance including blackjack, Texas Hold'em, and roulette.

Explorers Lounge

Explorers Lounge, located on the Fiesta Deck, is a multi functional venue with entertainment ranging from art auctions and game shows to... Read more

Wheelhouse Bar

Step into the Wheelhouse Bar on-board for a taste of British tradition. You'll find a menu of favourites advertised on chalkboards and... Read more

Churchill Lounge

The Churchill Lounge, on the Promenade Deck, is the ship's intimate smoking lounge where guests can also request a cognac from Crooners... Read more

Crooners Bar

Offering an enticing menu of 75 martinis, plus entertainers at spectacular duelling glass pianos.

Shops & Boutiques

The boutiques onboard offer more than just accessories and sundries you may have left at home. Shop onboard and benefit from incredible... Read more

Cyber Café

Internet access is available on all Princess vessels through the 24-hour onboard Internet Cafe and wireless network- which is available in staterooms... Read more

Health and fitness

The many activities onboard Coral Princess are designed to stimulate, educate, entertain, inspire and sweat - not necessarily in that order. But guests can be sure the crew onboard the ship, will do their best to cover all the bases. From art auctions to the Lotus Spa, this ship is loaded with fun things to do.

Pools & Spas

Sometimes floating serenely just isn't enough - splash around, ride the waves, swim against the current or take a dip in one... Read more

Sports Centre

This ship will keep you on the run, literally, with basketball, paddle tennis, jogging tracks and state-of-the-art gyms equipped with machines that'll... Read more

The Sanctuary

Leave stress at the door when you enter this blissful signature haven exclusively for adults. Perfect for that al fresco massage, feel... Read more

Kids and teens

Passengers ages 3-17 will enjoy many exciting onboard activities. The Youth Centres and Teen Lounges are staffed by experienced counsellors, who are ready to ensure the youngest cruisers stay happy all day long. There’s everything from art projects, game tables, the latest movies, pizza parties, talent shows, video games, and much more.

Children under the age of 3 are welcome to visit the Youth Centre, if accompanied and supervised by a parent at all times.

Princess Pelicans

Ages 3-7: There’s an exciting toddler area, a mini air hockey table, great arts and crafts stations, plus a space for group activities... Read more

Shockwaves

Ages 8-12: Offering games and activities like air hockey, skeeball, and video game stations – not to mention a dedicated lounge with a... Read more

Remix

Ages 13-17: Featuring a new lounge area, perfect for meeting new friends, with skeeball, foosball, and great video games. In the teen-only exclusive... Read more

Enrichment

When is a cruise an opportunity to enrich? When it's a Princess cruise. This ship offers area lectures, art exhibits and classes taught by local experts.

Edutainment

Princess Cruises believe learning is fun. Through their exclusive partnership with the California Science Centre, their Youth Staff are trained to deliver... Read more

[email protected]

Expand your mind with an array of engaging [email protected] opportunities. There are up to 40 classes on every cruise. Tantalise your taste... Read more

Art Collections, Galleries and Auctions

Princess Fine Arts auctions are fun, fast-paced, and offer an exciting opportunity to collect exceptional works of art. You’ll find some of... Read more

Princess Cruises Book Club

The Princess Cruises Book Club offers an opportunity for fascinating literary discussions among passengers. Books are carefully selected from a variety of... Read more

Useful info

Disabled Facilities

Wheelchair users will find access-friendly design across most of the Princess fleet, making it easy to enjoy each vessel's restaurants, theatres, spas,... Read more

Special Dietary Requirements

Princess Cruises are happy to meet your request for low-sodium, low-fat, low-sugar and vegetarian diets. Kosher meals and baby food are available... Read more

Age Restrictions

The legal drinking age of 21 years is always observed onboard all ships and proof of age may be required. All on-board... Read more

Dress Code

You should dress for a cruise with Princess the same way you would for any stylish land-based resort.
Casual sportswear, including shorts, lightweight... Read more

Drinks Packages

All Inclusive Beverage Package:
Relax and enjoy the convenience of an all inclusive beverage package featuring any drink up to $10 including cocktails,... Read more

E-Cigarette & Smoking Policies

Keeping the comfort of our guests a priority, and in consideration of consumer studies which show smokers are a small minority of... Read more

Sailing
Cabin
Details
Payment

Choose a sailing to book

Interior
Window
Balcony
Suite
Book with confidence

We know these are uncertain times, but don't fret. All bookings are covered by our Financial Protection Guarantee and we only work with cruise lines that are members of ATOL and ABTA. For more information about cancellation cover, visit the Coronavirus Cancellation Policies page.

How many people will be travelling?


* Passengers should be aged under 18 at the time of embarkation to qualify as a child.
Prices shown are per person based on two people sharing (unless otherwise specfied) in GBP and subject to availability. Certain restrictions can apply. Prices are updated on a daily basis and may vary when continuing through the booking process.