P&O Cruises

23-night Norway

Arcadia

Exclusively for adults, Arcadia offers relaxation in a chic setting, with a classic cruise atmosphere.

Explore the ship
Itinerary highlights
Boats in Southampton Harbour Southampton United Kingdom
The town of Kirkwall on the Orkney Islands Kirkwall, Orkney Islands United Kingdom
Blue Lagoon Geothermal Spa near Reykjavik, Iceland Reykjavik Iceland
Ship highlights
Photo of the Meridian Restaurant Meridian Restaurant
Photo of the Dance Classes Dance Classes
Photo of the Library Library
from
£2,399
per person
from
£104
per night
4 Aug 2021
£2,799 £2,399
4 Aug 2021
£3,199 £2,699
4 Aug 2021
£4,289 £3,449
4 Aug 2021
£6,579 £5,750
Book from £2,399 Email me this cruise

The itinerary

Southampton is the UK's largest and busiest cruise port, catering for over 1.5 million passengers every year. Located just a two hour drive out of London, or an 80-minute train journey, Southampton has a rich history on display across the city's museums and cultural venues, as well as leading shopping shopping outlets, many restaurants and bars, and award-winning public parks. Walking around the city centre, you'll see many remnants of the ancient city walls, don't miss the Bargate Monument – a Grade I-listed medieval gatehouse. Further afield, you can take in the sights of nearby cities of Portsmouth and Winchester, or visit the world-renowned heritage site of Stonehenge.

Boats in Southampton Harbour

Day 2At Sea

In bustling Kirkwall, the main town on Orkney, there's plenty to see in the narrow, winding streets extending from the harbor. The cathedral and some museums are highlights.

The town of Kirkwall on the Orkney Islands

Day 5At Sea

Day 6Eyjafjörður Iceland

Akureyri, called the Capital of the North is the second largest urban area in Iceland, and a lively one at that. Hemmed by the 60-km (37-mile) long Eyjafjörður, Akureyri is sheltered from the ocean winds and embraced by mountains on three sides. Late 19th-century wooden houses impart a sense of history, and the twin spires of a modern Lutheran church rising on a green hill near the waterfront, provide a focal point. To the south of Akureyri is the pyramid-shape rhyolite mountain Súlur. Beyond it is Kerling, the highest peak in Eyjafjörður District.

Day 6Hrísey Iceland

Sprawling Reykjavík, the nation's nerve center and government seat, is home to half the island's population. On a bay overlooked by proud Mt. Esja (pronounced eh-shyuh), with its ever-changing hues, Reykjavík presents a colorful sight, its concrete houses painted in light colors and topped by vibrant red, blue, and green roofs. In contrast to the almost treeless countryside, Reykjavík has many tall, native birches, rowans, and willows, as well as imported aspen, pines, and spruces.Reykjavík's name comes from the Icelandic words for smoke, reykur, and bay, vík. In AD 874, Norseman Ingólfur Arnarson saw Iceland rising out of the misty sea and came ashore at a bay eerily shrouded with plumes of steam from nearby hot springs. Today most of the houses in Reykjavík are heated by near-boiling water from the hot springs. Natural heating avoids air pollution; there's no smoke around. You may notice, however, that the hot water brings a slight sulfur smell to the bathroom.Prices are easily on a par with other major European cities. A practical option is to purchase a Reykjavík City Card at the Tourist Information Center or at the Reykjavík Youth Hostel. This card permits unlimited bus usage and admission to any of the city's seven pools, the Family Park and Zoo, and city museums. The cards are valid for one (ISK 3,300), two (ISK 4,400), or three days (ISK 4,900), and they pay for themselves after three or four uses a day. Even lacking the City Card, paying admission (ISK 500, or ISK 250 for seniors and people with disabilities) to one of the city art museums (Hafnarhús, Kjarvalsstaðir, or Ásmundarsafn) gets you free same-day admission to the other two.

Blue Lagoon Geothermal Spa near Reykjavik, Iceland

Sprawling Reykjavík, the nation's nerve center and government seat, is home to half the island's population. On a bay overlooked by proud Mt. Esja (pronounced eh-shyuh), with its ever-changing hues, Reykjavík presents a colorful sight, its concrete houses painted in light colors and topped by vibrant red, blue, and green roofs. In contrast to the almost treeless countryside, Reykjavík has many tall, native birches, rowans, and willows, as well as imported aspen, pines, and spruces.Reykjavík's name comes from the Icelandic words for smoke, reykur, and bay, vík. In AD 874, Norseman Ingólfur Arnarson saw Iceland rising out of the misty sea and came ashore at a bay eerily shrouded with plumes of steam from nearby hot springs. Today most of the houses in Reykjavík are heated by near-boiling water from the hot springs. Natural heating avoids air pollution; there's no smoke around. You may notice, however, that the hot water brings a slight sulfur smell to the bathroom.Prices are easily on a par with other major European cities. A practical option is to purchase a Reykjavík City Card at the Tourist Information Center or at the Reykjavík Youth Hostel. This card permits unlimited bus usage and admission to any of the city's seven pools, the Family Park and Zoo, and city museums. The cards are valid for one (ISK 3,300), two (ISK 4,400), or three days (ISK 4,900), and they pay for themselves after three or four uses a day. Even lacking the City Card, paying admission (ISK 500, or ISK 250 for seniors and people with disabilities) to one of the city art museums (Hafnarhús, Kjarvalsstaðir, or Ásmundarsafn) gets you free same-day admission to the other two.

Blue Lagoon Geothermal Spa near Reykjavik, Iceland

Day 10At Sea

Day 11At Sea

Day 12At Sea

Searching in 1553 for a northeast passage to India, British navigator Richard Chancellor came upon a crag 307 yards above the Barents Sea. He named the jut of rock North Cape, or Nordkapp. Today Europe's northernmost point is a rite-of-passage journey for nearly all Scandinavians and many others. Most cruise passengers visit Nordkapp from Honningsvåg, a fishing village on Magerøya Island. The journey from Honningsvåg to Nordkapp covers about 35 km (22 miles) across a landscape characterized by rocky tundra and grazing reindeer, which are rounded up each spring by Sami herdsmen in boats. The herdsmen herd the reindeer across a mile-wide channel from their winter home on the mainland. Honningvåg's northerly location makes for long, dark winter nights and perpetually sun-filled summer days. The village serves as the gateway to Arctic exploration and the beautiful Nordkapp Plateau, a destination that calls to all visitors of this region. Most of those who journey to Nordkapp (North Cape), the northernmost tip of Europe, are in it for a taste of this unique, otherworldly, rugged yet delicate landscape. You'll see an incredible treeless tundra, with crumbling mountains and sparse dwarf plants. The subarctic environment is very vulnerable, so don't disturb the plants. Walk only on marked trails and don't remove stones, leave car marks, or make campfires. Because the roads are closed in winter, the only access is from the tiny fishing village of Skarsvåg via Sno-Cat, a thump-and-bump ride that's as unforgettable as the desolate view.

Day 13North Cape Norway

With its centre located on the island of Tromsø, the municipality of Tromsø is more than five times the size of Norway’s capital, Oslo, and is the world’s northernmost university city. Lying 200 miles inside the Arctic Circle, it is known as the 'Gateway to the Arctic' because it was used as a starting point for hunters looking for Arctic foxes, polar bears and seals. In the 19th century it was a base for explorers on Arctic expeditions – a history that is remembered in the city’s Polar Museum, which you can visit on an excursion. Also commemorated in the area is the history of Norway’s indigenous people, the Sami. Visitors can learn about the traditions, heritage and modern preservation of the Sami culture at the Tromsø Museum. Nowadays, Tromsø is a charming mix of old and new, with wooden buildings sitting alongside contemporary architecture such as the impressive glacier-like Arctic Cathedral, which features one of the largest stained glass windows in Europe. Looking down on the city is Mount Storsteinen, and a cable car runs to the top, giving wonderful views over the surrounding countryside of forested peaks and reindeer pastures.

Blessed with some of the most spectacular scenery in Norway (and goodness only know that this is land blessed with rolling hills, soaring peaks, valleys, tranquil fjords and white sandy beaches, so the competition is high!), Leknes is what Norway is meant to be. Pretty red houses lay dotted on the green covered hills, and the midnight sun is rises above the horizon from 26th May to 17th July, (while in winter the sun does not rise from 9th December to 4th January). Part of the stunning Lofoten islands, this pretty port offers much in the way of recreation, although understandably most of this is outdoor based. Take a boat ride around the archipelago, try your hand at some deep sea fishing, or simply stroll thought the city centre, perhaps rent a bicycle and discover the hinterland at your own pace. Bikes can be easily rented and note that hybrid and electric bikes are a great option for those who might be a bit out of practice with their pedal power. Gastronomes with a sweet tooth will be rewarded with one simple pleasure: a fresh-from-the-oven skillingsbolle – or big, fluffy cinnamon rolls, fit for indulging in if all the fresh air has made you hungry! Look out for the quirky coffee shops, settle down for some Norwegian kos, say takk for maten and enjoy!

At 68 degrees North, Narvik lies 140 miles inside the Arctic Circle. Its history as a settlement began in the Stone Age, and Vikings are also known to have lived in the area. The modern town came into existence in the 1870s to serve the needs of the iron industry. Iron ore is mined in neighbouring Sweden and, as an ice-free port, Narvik was chosen as the ideal export location. The LKAB mining corporation is still a major employer and landowner in the area, shipping some 25,000,000 tons of iron ore from the port annually. This industrial heritage has shaped the town and now forms the basis of some of its most popular tourist attractions. In 1883 a co-owned British-Swedish company was given permission to build a railway connecting the Swedish iron mines in Kiruna to Narvik. It opened in 1902 and the town, then christened Victoriahavn, grew up around it. Unfortunately much of Narvik was destroyed in World War II. Invaded by the Nazis on 9 April 1940, it was later retaken by the Allies, representing the first military defeat of Hitler’s troops, but was evacuated as part of Operation Alphabet when it came under German occupation again. The local war museum documents the turbulent history of this period.

Day 17At Sea

One of Scandinavia's oldest cities, Trondheim was the first capital of Norway, from AD 997 to 1380. Founded in 997 by Viking king Olav Tryggvason, it was first named Nidaros (still the name of the cathedral), a composite word referring to the city's location at the mouth of the Nidelva River. Today, it's Central Norway's largest (and Norway's third largest) city, with a population of 150,000. The wide streets of the historic city center remain lined with brightly painted wood houses and striking warehouses. But it's no historic relic: it's also the home to NTNU (Norwegian University of Science and Technology) and is Norway's technological capital.

Nicknamed "Sommerbyen" ("Summer City"), Norway's fifth-largest city has 78,000 inhabitants. Norwegians come here for its sun-soaked beaches and beautiful harbor. Kristiansand has also become known internationally for the outdoor Quart Festival, which hosts local and international rock bands every July. According to legend, in 1641 King Christian IV marked the four corners of Kristiansand with his walking stick, and within that framework the grid of wide streets was laid down. The center of town, called the Kvadraturen, still retains the grid, even after numerous fires. In the northeast corner is Posebyen, one of northern Europe's largest collections of low, connected wooden house settlements, and there's a market here every Saturday in summer. Kristiansand's Fisketorvet (fish market) is near the south corner of the town's grid, right on the sea.

The coastal town of Ålesund is the commercial capital of the Møre og Romsdal district. But more important, it is noted for its characteristic Jugendstil (Art Nouveau) buildings, which some claim make Ålesund one of the most beautiful towns in Norway. This Art Nouveau style emerged when the town was completely rebuilt after a devastating fire in 1904 destroyed nearly 800 buildings and left 10,000 residents homeless. It is said that the fire started by a tipped oil lamp. Rebuilding was carried out with the help of many young, foreign architects who added their own flourishes to the architectural blend of German Jugendstil and Viking roots. Today, narrow streets are crammed with buildings topped with turrets, spires and gables that bear decorations of dragonheads and curlicues. As one of the few remaining Art Nouveau towns in the world, in 1998 Ålesund was awarded the coveted Houens National Memorial Prize for the preservation of its unique architecture.

Discover the uninhabited Island of Skjoldungen, surrounded by a stunning fjord. Its stunning landscape brings together mountains, glacial valleys, rocky outcrops, tundra and willow forests, creating an unmissable show. In this pristine landscape is also quite common to see bearded seals, orcas and birds such as the common redpoll, the northern wheatear, or the common raven.

Day 22At Sea

Day 23At Sea

Southampton is the UK's largest and busiest cruise port, catering for over 1.5 million passengers every year. Located just a two hour drive out of London, or an 80-minute train journey, Southampton has a rich history on display across the city's museums and cultural venues, as well as leading shopping shopping outlets, many restaurants and bars, and award-winning public parks. Walking around the city centre, you'll see many remnants of the ancient city walls, don't miss the Bargate Monument – a Grade I-listed medieval gatehouse. Further afield, you can take in the sights of nearby cities of Portsmouth and Winchester, or visit the world-renowned heritage site of Stonehenge.

Boats in Southampton Harbour

The ship Arcadia

Exclusively for adults, Arcadia offers relaxation in a chic setting, with a classic cruise atmosphere.

Capacity
2094
Cabins
952
Total crew
866
Length
935m

Food and drink

The ship features two speciality restaurants, a grand two-tier main dining room and a host of café’s and snack bars. From elegant fine dining to self-service buffets, there's a wide choice of flexible, casual and club dining options to suit everyone.

Meridian Restaurant

Featuring a galleried layout and refined décor, every night will be an occasion in the Meridian Restaurant.

At the stern end of F... Read more

Complimentary
Classic

Cafe Vivo

Just a few steps away from Arcadia's shops, this fantastic coffee shop is a great place to take a break and people... Read more

Cover
Cafe

Neptune Grill

For casual dining at its best, stop by the Neptune Grill, midships on the starboard side of Lido Deck.

Serving snacks, refreshments and... Read more

Cafe

Belvedere Restaurant

For flexible dining at any time, visit The Belvedere Restaurant, midships on Lido Deck.

So named because it commands fine views through floor-to-ceiling... Read more

Complimentary
Varies

The Ocean Grill

In Marco Pierre White's Ocean Grill you can look forward to all kinds of culinary delights.

From Baked Portobello Mushroom with Spinach Leaf... Read more

Cover
Gourmet

Sindhu Restaurant

Experience a taste of India in the Sindhu Restaurant.

The restaurant is located at the top of Arcadia on Sky Deck, adjacent to... Read more

Cover
Indian

Entertainment

There's never a dull moment...

P&O Cruises offers the very best in cruise entertainment. Days can be filled with as much or as little as you want, whilst evenings are no doubt the social highlight. When the sun goes down your ship begins to come alive with the hum of conversation and music, and you can be sure of a memorable night.

Piano Bar

The intimate Piano Bar provides the perfect atmosphere to relax with a drink and enjoy some beautiful music. With performances from the... Read more

The Palladium

This impressive three tier theatre, is located at the very forward end of the ship. Comfortable theatre-style-seating arcs around the stage in... Read more

The Crow's Nest

This relaxed lounge offers sweeping panoramic ocean views and a convivial atmosphere. By day passengers can sit back and relax with a... Read more

Monte Carlo Casino

The Monte Carlo Casino it a great place to continue a fun night out after post dinner drinks or a show. It... Read more

The Globe

With its shining black marble bar, sparkling starlights and glamorous décor, The Globe certainly provides the perfect atmosphere to relax in style.... Read more

The Screening Room

This 30-seat boutique cinema is Arcadia's dedicated space for showing films on board. It offers a variety of classic British films, family... Read more

Atrium

With numerous bars and venues emanating from it, the Atrium has a wonderfully contemporary feel. It boasts a dramatic shimmering two-tone curtain... Read more

Intermezzo

For a particularly special evening, luxuriate in Intermezzo with a glass of champagne or your favourite cocktail. The classy and modern hangout,... Read more

Spinnaker Bar

The large windows of the yacht-inspired Spinnaker Bar allow natural light to fill the room, showcasing its sophisticated, contemporary décor. Its the... Read more

The Rising Sun

If you thought the British Victorian style pub was a thing of the past, you'll be pleased to know it lives on... Read more

East Bar

With stunning views out to the ocean beyond, the colonial style East Bar is the perfect place to relax. As the sun... Read more

The Viceroy Room

The Viceroy Room has a timeless gentleman's club feel. This restful space is designed for peace, reflection, and quiet conversation. Chat with... Read more

Neptune Bar

Decorative ceramic pebbles cover the bar surround, giving you the feel of a pebble beach come rain or shine. But, as the... Read more

Aquarius Bar

This full-service, outdoor bar is bamboo clad and lends a tropical feel to the Aquarius Pool area. Enjoy a brief respite from... Read more

Health and fitness

From the revitalising hydrotherapy pool, to the state of the art gymnasium, there's plenty of facilities onboard to refresh your mind, body and soul. Passengers can enjoy luxury massages and treatments in the Oasis Spa, or head out to the top deck sports court for a spot of tennis.

Oasis Spa

With superb ocean views and relaxing cream décor, the tranquil Oasis Spa is the perfect place to relax and be pampered. In... Read more

The Retreat

The Retreat, is a room designed to be 'zen' - the ultimate space for relaxation. This light and airy room, with comfy... Read more

Sports Court

Whether you enjoy the friendly competition of an organised tournament or prefer to play casually with your own party, short tennis, football,... Read more

Gymnasium

Passengers can watch the waves as they work out with all the latest equipment, including exercise bikes, rowing machines, running machines, steppers,... Read more

Salon

The fully equipped salon is the perfect place for those who want to look their best. Located in the spa, passengers can... Read more

Swimming Pools

Neptune Pool- Covered by a skydome, you can always take to the water no matter what the weather. Located on Lido Deck, between the... Read more

Kids and teens

As an adult only ship, Arcadia does not feature any Kids & Teens facilities.

Enrichment

The ship's fantastic New Horizons programme offers to passengers the chance to leave their cruise with a new hobby, skill or passion. With classes ranging from cookery, and ballroom dancing, to feng shui and tai chi, passengers can search for true enlightenment.

Dance Classes

There are coupled dance instructors onboard who offer a variety of dance lessons. The main types of dance offered are ballroom and... Read more

Library

The ship's well-stocked library is perfect for finding a great book to enjoy by the pool. Choose from an extensive range of... Read more

Useful info

Special Dietary Requirements

The ship can cater for the following diets; vegetarian, low /no fat, low salt /no salt, lactose intolerant /dairy free, gluten /wheat... Read more

Disabled Facilites

Fully accessible adapted cabins and suites are available, which are suitable for wheelchair / mobility scooter users. Passengers with a disability which... Read more

Age Restrictions

As with UK laws, the age limit for purchase and consumption of alcohol on board is 18 years of age, however, when... Read more

Dress Code

The ship operates three styles of dress code: Smart, Evening Casual and Black Tie.

On Smart evenings ladies typically wear tailored trousers and... Read more

Smoking & E-cigarette Policy

There are dedicated areas onboard where smoking is permitted. Smoking is not permitted in any public room, inside cabin or on cabin... Read more

Sailing
Cabin
Details
Payment

Choose a sailing to book

Interior
Window
Balcony
Suite
Book with confidence

We know these are uncertain times, but don't fret. All bookings are covered by our Financial Protection Guarantee and we only work with cruise lines that are members of ATOL and ABTA. For more information about cancellation cover, visit the Coronavirus Cancellation Policies page.

How many people will be travelling?


* Passengers should be aged under 18 at the time of embarkation to qualify as a child.
Prices shown are per person based on two people sharing (unless otherwise specfied) in GBP and subject to availability. Certain restrictions can apply. Prices are updated on a daily basis and may vary when continuing through the booking process.